SFU Calendar 2001-2002

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School of Engineering Science


9851 Applied Sciences Building, 778.782 4371 Tel, 778.782 -4951 Fax, http://fas.sfu.ca/ensc

Director

J.D. Jones BSc (Sus), PhD (Reading), PEng

Professors Emeriti

T.W. Calvert BSc(Eng) (Lond), MSEE (Wayne), PhD (Carnegie Tech), PEng

V. Cuperman MSc (TI Bucharest), SB, MS, PhD (Calif), PEng

D.A. George BEng (McG), MS (Stan), ScD (MIT), PEng

Professors

J.S. Bird BASc (Br Col), PhD (Car), PEng

J.K. Cavers BASc, PhD (Br Col), PEng

G.H. Chapman BSc, MSc (Qu), PhD (McM), PEng

M.J. Deen BSc (Guy), MS, PhD (Case W Reserve)

J.C. Dill BASc (Br Col), MS (N Carolina), PhD (Cal Tech), PEng

W.A. Gruver BSEE (Penn), DIC (Lond), MSEE, PhD (Penn)

R.H.S. Hardy BSc(Eng), PhD (Alta), PEng

P.K.M. Ho BSc, BE (Sask), PhD (Qu), PEng

R.F. Hobson BSc (Br Col), PhD (Wat)*

A.M. Leung BS, MS, PhD (Case W Reserve), PEng

A.H. Rawicz MSc (Cracow), PhD (Gliwice)

M. Saif BSc, MSc, PhD (Cleveland), PEng

S.P. Stapleton BEng, MEng, PhD (Carleton), PEng

M. Syrzycki MSc, PhD (Warsaw)

Associate Professors

C.R. Bolognesi BEng (McG), MEng (Car), PhD (Calif)***

K.K. Gupta BTech (IIT Delhi), MEng, PhD (McG), PEng

J.D. Jones BSc (Sus), PhD (Reading), PEng

M. Parameswaran BE (Madr), MSc, PhD (Alta)

S. Payandeh BSc, MS (Akron), MASc, PhD (Tor), PEng

L. Trajkovic Dipl (Pristina, Yugoslavia), MS & MS (Syracuse), PhD (Calif)

J. Vaisey BSc (Manit), MSc (Qu), PhD (Calif), PEng

Adjunct Professors

D. Connor BASc, MASc, PhD (Br Col)

P.A. Fox BSc (Pretoria), Grad Dip Eng, PhD (Cape Town)

D. Gelbart BSc, MSc (Technion, Israel)

M. Hope BPE (Calg), MEd (S Fraser)

A.B.S. Hussain BSc (Eng) (Bangladesh), PhD (Br Col)

B. Keefer BEng (RMC), PhD (Br Col), PEng

D. Kiel BSc, MSc (Alta), PhD (Camb)

E. Kim BSc (Seoul), MSc, PhD (Manit)

D. Kotak MSIE (Calif), BEng (Bom)

J.S. MacDonald BASc (Br Col), MS, PhD (MIT), PEng

J.A. McEwen BASc, PhD (Br Col), PEng

J.B. Peters BASc, PhD (Br Col), PEng

P. Rai-Choudhury BSc (Gauhati, India), DipGradStudies (Birm), MASc (Br Col), PhD (Pitt)

T.C. Routledge BEng (McG), PEng

K.A. Spencer BASc (Br Col), PhD (Br Col), MBA (S Fraser)

S.A. Wessel BSc, PhD (S Fraser)

J. Wu MSc (Coventry), PhD (Wales)

Associate Members

P.N.S. Bawa, Kinesiology

R.F. Frindt, Physics

J.A. Hoffer, Kinesiology

E. Love, Business Administration

Senior Lecturers

S.A. Stevenson BA, MA (Br Col)

S. Whitmore BA (Nelson), MA (S Fraser)

Laboratory Instructors

P. Leung BSEE (Texas Tech), PEng

L. One BSc (S Fraser)

Advisors

Ms. T. Behrisch, coop coordinator, 9825 Applied Sciences Building, 778.782 -5806, behrisch@sfu.ca

Mr. A. Jenkins, coop coordinator, 9827 Applied Sciences Building, (604) 268-6703, djenkins@sfu.ca

Ms. A. Radisic, 9847 Applied Sciences Building, 778.782 -4295, radisic@sfu.ca

*joint appointment with computing science

***joint appointment with physics

Programs Offered

Engineering Science Program

This program leads to the degree of bachelor of applied science (BASc).

Transfer to Engineering Science

A limited number of places are available for students who wish to transfer into engineering science from other departments and institutions. Successful applicants have usually attained a CGPA of 3.5 or equivalent in a full course load of relevant courses prior to entry.

Minor in Computer and Electronics Design

This program is available to all non-engineering science majors at Simon Fraser University who have high academic standing. This program does not lead to an accredited engineering degree.

Admission

Students who wish to study engineering science must be eligible for admission to the University and must submit applications as described in the Admission and Readmission section. Concurrent to the SFU admission application, students must also submit a separate application to the admissions committee, School of Engineering Science, which includes an `open' application letter explaining the applicant's interest in engineering, a resume, a copy of the most recent report card and a reference letter from a math/physics teacher.

Admission is limited to 80 students. An `A' standing in mathematics 12, physics 12, chemistry 12 and at least a `B' standing in English 12 is expected. The School of Engineering Science makes the final decision on all applications.

Engineering admission inquiries may be sent by email to ensc-adm@sfu.ca More detailed admission information is on the World Wide Web at www.ensc.sfu.ca

Interested students should apply as early as possible since the program usually fills early. In special circumstances, students may enter in spring or summer semesters.

Transfer Credit and Residency Requirements

Transfer students are advised that residency requirements apply to all programs offered by the School of Engineering Science. See "Residency Requirements"..

BASc Program

Engineering science students develop skills in systems design along with a high level of scientific knowledge. The program is demanding and is aimed at the superior student. The goal of the program is to produce well educated, innovative engineer/scientists who have entrepreneurial skills and attitudes and who are oriented to the new technologies. Entry to the program is on a competitive basis. Students admitted to the first year of engineering science must achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.75 (first year) to remain in the program. Students completing their second or subsequent year must maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 (B) to remain in the program. Note that a first year CGPA below 3.0 is not included in the calculation.

The program may be completed in four and two thirds years which includes eight semesters of course work, and two semesters for thesis completion. Some courses may also be taken in these final two semesters if required. Students undertake a basic core of pure, applied and engineering sciences followed by studies in a specialized option.

The school began offering courses in September, 1983. There are four major areas of concentration where the faculty members' research strengths are interrelated with the undergraduate curriculum. Students should select one of the following options: electronics engineering option, computer engineering option, engineering physics option, systems option.

A biomedical engineering stream prepares students to pursue either graduate training or work in the interdisciplinary field of engineering as applied to the medical sciences. This stream is combined with one of the other four areas of concentration.

In all ENSC courses, computers emphasize learning, conceptualization, design and analysis. Built into the program are courses on social impacts of technology, finance, management, design methods and entrepreneurship intended to complement scientific studies. A special, integrated communications course taken throughout the eight academic semesters ensures that all engineering science graduates have the communication skills necessary to be effective engineers.

Industrial Experience

Every student must complete a cooperative education program of at least three work semesters (not including ENSC 194) and a thesis project. After the first year, students typically alternate between academic and work semesters. This results in a combination of work in an industrial or research setting with study in one of the four engineering options. Toward the end of academic studies and under the direction of a practising engineer or scientist, students work on a major project in an industry or research setting. This forms the basis for thesis work. A thesis proposal is typically submitted in the ninth semester and all thesis requirements are completed by the end of the tenth semester.

Students may also participate in additional work semesters for further valuable experience and the chance to investigate career choices. The engineering science cooperative education program is administered through the School of Engineering Science by the school's coop coordinators whose responsibility it is to find and maintain appropriate work placements.

BASc Requirements

All requirements of one of the four options (a minimum of 156-157 credit hours) must be completed. Each option provides a mix of basic science, general studies, engineering science, specialized engineering and science, plus project and laboratory work.

A graduation GPA of at least 3.0 calculated either on all the required courses taken, or on the upper division credits only, is required.

Students must complete a three semester cooperative education program of practical experience in an appropriate industrial or research setting leading to a project under the technical direction of a practising engineer or scientist. The internship may take place within the University but in most cases the work site is off campus. A member of the external organization and a faculty member from the school jointly supervise the project.

ENSC 498, taken in the ninth semester, provides supervised study and practical work in research, development or advanced engineering. A project thesis based on this activity is submitted, and the thesis work presented, to at least the industrial and academic supervisory committee for approval.

Specialized study is completed in one of four options: systems, electronics engineering, computer engineering and engineering physics (see below).

Although there is no strict requirement to follow these course sequences, those taking less than the designated load must be careful about scheduling and prerequisite problems in subsequent semesters. Failure to take those courses identified with an asterisk in the designated semester will almost certainly lead to such problems. Any semester taken with fewer than 15 credit hours requires prior approval by the director.

The general studies section of the program consists of non-technical courses which broaden education and develop awareness of social, economic and managerial factors affecting engineering and scientific work. All units of the engineering communication course must be completed. In complementary studies, at least one course must deal with science and technology within society and one must deal with central issues, methodologies and thought processes of humanities and social sciences. Other complementary studies courses may deal with these subjects or may be chosen from business, arts, humanities and social sciences. Permission may be required from the appropriate department, school or faculty to register in some of these courses. A pre-approved list of complementary studies courses is available from the school. Other courses may be acceptable with the approval of the undergraduate curriculum committee chair.

Engineering Science Common Core

Courses and Typical Schedule
Semester One (Fall)

CHEM 121-4 General Chemistry and Laboratory I

ENSC 100-3 Engineering Technology and Society*

ENSC 101-1 Writing Process, Persuasion and Presentations

ENSC 150-3 Introduction to Computer Design*

MATH 151-3 Calculus I*

PHYS 120-3 Modern Physics and Mechanics*

17 credit hours

Semester Two (Spring)

CMPT 101-4 Introduction to Computer Programming*

ENSC 102-1 Form, Style and Professional Genres*

ENSC 151-2 Digital and Computer Design Laboratory*

ENSC 250-3 Introduction to Computer Architecture*

MATH 152-3 Calculus II*

PHYS 121-3 Optics, Electricity and Magnetism*

PHYS 131-2 General Physics Laboratory B*

18 credit hours

Semester Three (Fall)

ECON 103-3 Principles of Microeconomics

ENSC 220-3 Electric Circuits I*

ENSC 350-3 Digital Systems Design (C,E)

MACM 101-3 Discrete Mathematics I* (C,S)

MATH 232-3 Elementary Linear Algebra*

MATH 251-3 Calculus III* (E,P,S)

MATH 310-3 Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations*

PHYS 211-3 Intermediate Mechanics* (P)

18 credit hours

Semester Four (Summer)

CMPT 201-4 Data and Program Abstraction* (C,S)

ENSC 204-1 Graphical Communication for Engineering*

ENSC 201-3 The Business of Engineering

ENSC 225-4 Microelectronics I*

MATH 251-3 Calculus III* (C)

MATH 252-3 Vector Calculus* (P,E)

PHYS 221-3 Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism* (P,E,S)

STAT 270-3 Introduction to Probability and Statistics*

18 credit hours (C,S); 17 credit hours (P,E)

*should be taken in the designated semester; consequences of deviating from this schedule are the responsibility of the student.

Italicized courses are only required by the program option that appears in parenthesis next to them: C (computer engineering option), E (electronics engineering option), P (engineering physics option), and S (systems option). As an example, a student in the systems option in his/her third semester would be expected to carry 18 credit hours and should take MACM 101, and MATH 251 from the courses that appear in italic type.

Electronics Engineering Option

This specialization within electrical engineering directly relates to microelectronics and its applications in communications, control and computing. Engineers in this field are involved with the design and fabrication of systems utilizing electronic components and subsystems.

Courses and Typical Schedule
Semester Five (Spring)

ENSC 304-1 Human Factors and Usability Engineering*

ENSC 320-3 Electric Circuits II*

ENSC 330-4 Engineering Materials

ENSC 351-4 Real Time and Embedded Systems*

ENSC 380-3 Linear Systems*

PHYS 324-3 Electromagnetics 18 credit hours

Semester Six (Fall)

Cmpl I-3 first complementary elective1

ENSC 305-1 Project Documentation and Team Dynamics*

ENSC 325-4 Microelectronics II*

ENSC 327-4 Communication Systems*

ENSC 340-3 Engineering Science Project*

ENSC 383-4 Feedback Control Systems*

19 credit hours

Semester Seven (Spring)

Ensc I-4 first Engineering Science elective2

ENSC 406-2 Social Responsibility and Professional Practice*

MACM 316-3 Numerical Analysis I

Scie I-3 first science elective3

Tech I-3 first technical (computing science, science or math) elective3

Tech II-3 second technical (computing science, science or math) elective3 18 credit hours

Semester Eight (Fall)

Cmpl II-3 second complementary studies elective1

Scie II-3 second science elective3

Ensc II-4 second Engineering Science elective2

Ensc III-4 third Engineering Science elective2

Ensc IV-4 fourth Engineering Science elective2

18 credit hours

Other Requirements

ENSC 498-3 Engineering Science Thesis Proposal

ENSC 499-9 Engineering Science
Undergraduate Thesis 12 credit hours

Total 155 credit hours

*should be taken at this point in the program; consequences of deviations from this schedule are the responsibility of the student.

1must be an approved course. A pre-approved list of complementary studies courses is available from the School of Engineering Science.

2chosen from ENSC 424, 425, 426, 427, 428, 429, 450, 481, 483, 488, 489, 495. With permission of the undergraduate curriculum committee chair, students may replace one of their engineering science electives by either a directed study or a special project laboratory course. Special Topics courses that have been approved by the undergraduate curriculum committee chair and the director may be counted here.

3must be an approved course; consult pre-approved electives list available from the school. Under special circumstances, approval for other courses from the undergraduate curriculum committee chair may be granted.

Note: In the typical schedule shown above, students will start their thesis work (ENSC 498 and 499) between semesters seven and eight. Theses can be done on or off campus, either integrated with an optional (or mandatory) work term or as independent work with appropriate supervision.

Computer Engineering Option

The dynamic, on-going development and application of computer and digital systems requires computer systems engineers to have a balanced capability in software and hardware, as well as a solid engineering base.

Courses and Typical Schedule
Semester Five (Spring)

CMPT 275-4 Software Engineering*

MACM 201-3 Discrete Mathematics II*

ENSC 304-1 Human Factors and Usability Engineering*

ENSC 320-3 Electric Circuits II*

ENSC 351-4 Real Time and Embedded Systems*

ENSC 380-3 Linear Systems* 18 credit hours

Semester Six (Fall)

ENSC 305-1 Project Documentation and Team Dynamics*

ENSC 325-4 Microelectronics II*

ENSC 327-4 Communication Systems*

ENSC 340-3 Engineering Science Project*

ENSC 383-4 Feedback Control Systems*

SCIE I-3 first science elective3 19 credit hours

Semester Seven (Spring)

Cmpl I-3 first complementary elective1

CMPT 300-3 Operating Systems I

Ensc I-4 first Engineering Science elective2

ENSC 406-2 Social Responsibility and Professional Practice*

MACM 316-3 Numerical Analysis I

Scie II-3 second science elective3 18 credit hours

Semester Eight (Fall)

Cmpl II-3 second complementary studies elective1

Scie II-3 third science elective3

Ensc II-4 second Engineering Science elective2

ENSC 450-4 VLSI Systems Design

SCI IV-3 fourth science elective3 17 credit hours

Other Requirements

ENSC 498-3 Engineering Science Thesis Proposal

ENSC 499-9 Engineering Science Undergraduate Thesis 12 credit hours

Total 155 credit hours

*should be taken in the designated semester; consequences of deviating from this schedule are the responsibility of the student.

1must be an approved course. A pre-approved list of complementary studies courses is available from the School of Engineering Science.

2chosen from ENSC 424, 425, 426, 427, 428, 429, 481, 483, 488, 489, 495. With permission of the undergraduate curriculum committee chair, students may replace one of their engineering science electives by either a directed study or a special project laboratory course. Special Topics courses that have been approved by the undergraduate curriculum committee chair and the director may be counted here.

3must be an approved course; consult pre-approved electives list available from the school. Under special circumstances, approval for other courses from the undergraduate curriculum committee chair may be granted.

Note: In the typical schedule shown above, students will start their thesis work (ENSC 498 and 499) between semesters seven and eight. Theses can be done on or off campus, either integrated with an optional (or mandatory) work term or as independent work with appropriate supervision.

Engineering Physics (Electronics) Option

This option prepares students for work in engineering and applied sciences that is strongly dependent on a sound knowledge of physics in addition to engineering fundamentals.

Courses and Typical Schedule
Semester Five (Spring)

Cmpl I-3 first complementary elective1

ENSC 304-1 Human Factors and Usability Engineering*

ENSC 320-3 Electric Circuits II*

ENSC 351-4 Real Time and Embedded Systems*

ENSC 380-3 Linear Systems*

PHYS 233-2 Introductory Physics Laboratory A*

PHYS 324-3 Electromagnetics* 19 credit hours

Semester Six (Fall)

Cmpl II-3 second complementary elective1

ENSC 305-1 Project Documentation and Team Dynamics*

ENSC 325-4 Microelectronics II*

ENSC 327-4 Communication Systems*

ENSC 340-3 Engineering Science Project*

ENSC 383-4 Feedback Control Systems*

19 credit hours

Semester Seven (Spring)

Ensc I-4 first Engineering Science elective2

Ensc II-4 second Engineering Science elective2

ENSC 406-2 Social Responsibility and Professional Practice*

PHYS 344-3 Thermal Physics

PHYS 365-3 Semiconductor Device Physics

PHYS 385-3 Quantum Physics 18 credit hours

Semester Eight (Fall)

Ensc II-4 second Engineering Science elective2

Ensc III-4 third Engineering Science elective2

PHYS 332-3 Intermediate Laboratory

PHYS 384-3 Methods of Theoretical Physics

PHYS 445-3 Statistical Physics

PHYS 355-3 Optics 16 credit hours

Other Requirements

ENSC 498-3 Engineering Science Thesis Proposal

ENSC 499-9 Engineering Science Undergraduate Thesis 12 credit hours

Total 155 credit hours

*should be taken in the designated semester; consequences of deviating from this schedule are the responsibility of the student.

1must be an approved course. A pre-approved list of complementary studies courses is available from the School of Engineering Science.

2chosen from ENSC 424, 425, 426, 427, 428, 429, 450, 481, 483, 488, 489, 495. With permission of the undergraduate curriculum committee chair, students may replace one of their engineering science electives by either a directed study or a special project laboratory course. Special Topics courses that have been approved by the undergraduate curriculum committee chair and the director may be counted here.

3 must be an approved course; consult preapproved electives list available from the school. Under special circumstances, approval for other courses from the undergraduate curriculum committee chair may be granted.

Note: In the typical schedule shown above, students will start their thesis work (ENSC 498 and 499) between semesters seven and eight. Theses can be done on or off campus, either integrated with an optional (or mandatory) work term or as independent work with appropriate supervision.

Systems Option

This option prepares for careers in the design and integration of computer-controlled machines and devices, and provides for graduate study in robotics, control and mechatronic systems. Students integrate knowledge from electronic engineering, mechanical engineering, and computer engineering into the fundamental design process. This focused program includes study of mechanical structures and mechanisms, electro-mechanical sensors and actuators, control engineering, and real-time systems. Electives may be used to tailor curriculum to specific interests.

Courses and Typical Schedule
Semester Five (Spring)

ENSC 230-4 Introduction to Mechanical Design*

ENSC 304-1 Human Factors and Usability Engineering*

ENSC 320-3 Electric Circuits II*

ENSC 330-4 Engineering Materials

ENSC 351-4 Real Time and Embedded Systems*

ENSC 380-3 Linear Systems* 19 credit hours

Semester Six (Fall)

Cmpl I-3 first complementary elective1

ENSC 305-1 Project Documentation and Team Dynamics*

ENSC 325-4 Microelectronics II*

ENSC 340-3 Engineering Science Project*

ENSC 383-4 Feedback Control Systems*

ENSC 387-4 Introduction to Electromechanical Sensors and Actuators* 19 credit hours

Semester Seven (Spring)

ENSC I-4 first Engineering Science elective2

ENSC 406-2 Social Responsibility and Professional Practice*

ENSC 483-4 Modern Control Systems*

Scie I-3 first science elective3

MACM 316-3 Numerical Analysis I 16 credit hours

Semester Eight (Fall)

Cmpl II-3 second complementary elective1

ENSC 488-4 Introduction to Robotics*

ENSC 489-4 Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing*

Ensc II-4 second Engineering Science elective2

Scie II-3 second science elective3 18 credit hours

Other Requirements

ENSC 498-3 Engineering Science Thesis Proposal

ENSC 499-9 Engineering Science Undergraduate Thesis 12 credit hours

Total 155 credit hours

*should be taken in the designated semester; consequences of deviating from this schedule are the responsibility of the student.

1must be an approved course. A pre-approved list of complementary studies courses is available from the School of Engineering Science.

2chosen from ENSC 424, 425, 426, 427, 428, 429, 450, 481, 495. With permission of the undergraduate curriculum committee chair, students may replace one of their engineering science electives by either a directed study or a special project laboratory course. Special Topics courses that have been approved by the undergraduate curriculum committee chair and the director may be counted here.

3must be an approved course; consult pre-approved electives list available from the school. Under special circumstances, approval for other courses from the undergraduate curriculum committee chair may be granted.

Note: In the typical schedule shown above, students will start their thesis work (ENSC 498 and 499) between semesters seven and eight. Theses can be done on or off campus, either integrated with an optional (or mandatory) work term or as independent work with appropriate supervision.

Biomedical Engineering Stream

This stream concerns engineering problems encountered in medical and surgical treatment, in human interactions in a variety of environments, in medical instrumentation, and in biomechanics. Being interdisciplinary, the stream consists of a basic undergraduate Engineering degree in one of the existing options, plus additional undergraduate biomedical-related courses. These requirements enhance the student's background before pursuing graduate training in biomedical engineering.

Students should fulfil course requirements for one of these options: electronics engineering, engineering physics, systems, or computer engineering. As well, the following courses are required.

BISC 101-4 General Biology

KIN 205-3 Introduction to Human Physiology

MBB 221-3 Cellular Biology and Biochemistry

and one of

KIN 305-3 Human Physiology I

KIN 306-3 Human Physiology II (Principles of Physiological Regulation)

Two additional upper division courses are also required from the biomedical area, with the school's approval. A list of eligible courses is available from the School of Engineering Science.

It is recommended that students choose from the above courses for their science electives in their undergraduate option.

Students intending to pursue an MASc degree can co-ordinate their undergraduate proposal and thesis (ENSC 498 and 499) with their MASc proposal, thereby satisfying both requirements. Contact the departmental assistant for further details.

Minor in Computer and Electronics Design

Admission Requirements

Entrance to the minor program is open to all non-engineering science majors enrolled at Simon Fraser University. However, enrolment is limited and students can be accepted into the minor program only through a formal application to the school. Students will normally apply for admission to the minor after they have completed CMPT 250 or ENSC 250.

Program Requirements

This program is comprised of a selection of courses from the computer engineering option and the electronics engineering option.

Students must complete all of the following courses

ENSC 150-3 Introduction to Computer Design

ENSC 151-2 Digital and Computer Design Laboratory

ENSC 250-3 Introduction to Computer Architecture

ENSC 220-3 Electric Circuits I

ENSC 225-4 Microelectronics I

ENSC 350-3 Digital Systems Design

ENSC 351-4 Real Time and Embedded Systems

plus at least seven of

ENSC 325-4 Microelectronics II

ENSC 327-4 Communication Systems

ENSC 380-3 Linear Systems

ENSC 424-4 Multimedia Communications Engineering

ENSC 425-4 Electronic System Design

ENSC 427-4 Communication Networks

ENSC 429-4 Discrete Time Systems

ENSC 450-4 VLSI Systems Design

ENSC 489-4 Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing

ENSC 495-4 Introduction to Microelectronic Fabrication

The engineering science graduation GPA in the above courses must be a B (3.0) or better. If it drops below 3.0, you may be required to withdraw from the program.



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