SFU Calendar 2001-2002

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Department of Linguistics


9201 Robert C. Brown Hall, (604) 291-4585 Tel, (604) 291-5659 Fax, www.ling.sfu.ca

Chair

(to be announced)

Professor Emeritus

J.A. Foley BA (Nebraska), PhD (MIT)

Professors

D.B. Gerdts BA (Missouri), MA (Br Col), PhD (Calif)

E.W. Roberts BA (Wales), MA, PhD (Camb)

R. Saunders BA (Penn State), AM, PhD (Brown)

Associate Professors

P. McFetridge BA, MA, PhD (S Fraser)

Z. McRobbie PhD (Budapest), PhD (Manit)

M. Munro BEd, MSc, PhD (Alta)

T.A. Perry BA (Wabash), MA, PhD (Indiana), Associate Dean of Arts

Assistant Professors

N. Hedberg BA, PhD (Minn)

T. Heift I and II Staatsexamen (Germany), MA, PhD (S Fraser)

J.D. Mellow BA (Calg), MA (McG), PhD (Br Col)

J.M. Sosa ProfLit&Ling (Venezuela Central), MA (Lond), PhD (Mass)

Senior Lecturers

N. Omae MA (Osaka), MPhil (Exe)

L. Zuccolo BA (Arg), MA (S Fraser)

Lecturer

B. Ng BA (Intl Christian, Japan), MA (Lond)

Associated Faculty

F. Popowich, Computing Science

W. Turnbull, Psychology

J. Walls, Humanities

M. Boelscher-Ignace, First Nations Studies, Sociology and Anthropology

Advisors

Ms. R. Parmar, 9200 Robert C. Brown Hall, 778.782 -5739

Mrs. H. Coleman, Certificate in First Nations Language Proficiency Advisor, 6189 Academic Quadrangle, 778.782 -5595

The Department of Linguistics offers honors, major, extended minor and minor programs in linguistics and participates in the interdisciplinary programs of the cognitive science program.

Program requirements for the honors, major, extended minor and minor programs are listed below. Students pursuing linguistics should seek advice early in their programs. General course descriptions are given in Undergraduate Courses.

Courses of Interest to Students Outside the Department

These general interest courses give insight into language and linguistics, and have no prerequisites.

LING 100-3 Communication and Language

LING 110-3 The Wonder of Words

LING 200-3 Introduction to the Description of English Grammar

LING 220-3 Introduction to Linguistics

LING 260-3 Language, Culture, and Society

The following courses, although they carry prerequisites, may interest those with particular language specialties (when they focus on the language of their interest).

LING 231-3 Introduction to an Amerindian Language I

LING 232-3 Introduction to an Amerindian Language II

LING 431-3 Language Structures I

LING 432-3 Language Structures II

The languages that are selected as a focus for these courses are shown in the Course Timetable and Exam Schedule for the semester in which the course is offered.

Major Program

Lower Division Requirements

LING 130-3 Practical Phonetics

LING 220-3 Introduction to Linguistics

LING 221-3 Introduction to Phonology

LING 222-3 Introduction to Syntax

plus three additional credit hours in 200 level linguistics courses.

Upper Division Requirements

LING 321-3 Phonology

LING 322-3 Syntax

plus any two of

LING 323-3 Morphology

LING 324-3 Semantics

LING 330-3 Phonetics

plus 18 additional credit hours in upper division linguistics courses.

Honors Program

Lower Division Requirements

LING 130-3 Practical Phonetics

LING 220-3 Introduction to Linguistics

LING 221-3 Introduction to Phonology

LING 222-3 Introduction to Syntax

plus three additional credit hours in 200 level linguistics courses

Upper Division Requirements

LING 321-3 Phonology

LING 322-3 Syntax

LING 490-3 Honors Essay

plus any two of

LING 323-3 Morphology

LING 324-3 Semantics

LING 330-3 Phonetics

plus 35 additional hours chosen from upper division linguistics courses.

Minor Program

Lower Division Requirements

LING 130-3 Practical Phonetics

LING 220-3 Introduction to Linguistics

plus nine additional credit hours in 200 level linguistics courses

Upper Division Requirements

Students must complete 15 hours of upper division linguistics courses.

Note: General course descriptions are given in the Undergraduate Courses section (page 161).

Extended Minor Program

An extended minor consists of the lower division requirements for a major and the upper division requirements for a minor. Certain other criteria may be set by individual departments and programs. A student must have their program approved by the advisor for the extended minor program.

Joint Major in Linguistics and Sociology and Anthropology

Linguistics, sociology and anthropology are kindred disciplines, each concerned with culture, cognition and social relations. Students will acquire practical multidisciplinary expertise in the sociological or anthropological aspects of language study.

The joint major is of special interest to those pursuing the certificate in First Nations language proficiency or the certificate in native studies research, as well as to students interested in the anthropology or sociology of language and in sociolinguistics, anthropological linguistics, or cognitive science.

Lower Division Requirements
Linguistics

Students must complete both of

LING 130-3 Practical Phonetics

LING 220-3 Introduction to Linguistics

and one of

LING 241-3 Languages of the World

LING 260-3 Language, Culture and Society

plus six additional credit hours in 200 division LING courses. Note that LING 221 and 222 are required for most upper division LING courses.

Sociology and Anthropology

Students must complete both of

SA 101-4 Introduction to Anthropology

SA 255-4 Introduction to Social Research

and one of

SA 100-4 Perspectives on Canadian Society

SA 150-4 Introduction to Sociology

and one of

SA 201-4 Anthropology of Modern Life

SA 263-4 Peasants, Proletarians and the Global Economy

SA 286-4 Aboriginal Peoples and British Columbia: Introduction (A)

SA 293-4 Special Topics in Anthropology

SA 294-4 Special Topics in Sociology and Anthropology*

*when an anthropology (A) listing

plus four additional credit hours in a 200 level SA course.

For students interested in pursuing a sociolinguistic focus, the following is recommended.

SA 250-4 Introduction to Sociological Theory

STAT 203-3 Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences

Upper Division Requirements
Linguistics

Students must complete three of

LING 321-3 Phonology

LING 322-3 Syntax

LING 323-3 Morphology

LING 324-3 Semantics

LING 330-3 Phonetics

LING 331-3 Description and Analysis of a First Nations Language I

and one of

LING 332-3 Description and Analysis of a First Nations Language II

LING 408-3 Field Linguistics

LING 409-3 Sociolinguistics

plus nine additional upper division LING credit hours. The following courses are recommended.

LING 407-3 Historical Linguistics

LING 430-3 Native American Languages

LING 441-3 Linguistic Universals and Typology

Sociology and Anthropology

Students must complete both of

SA 301-4 Contemporary Ethnography (A)

SA 356-4 Ethnography and Qualitative Methods (SA)

plus 12 additional credit hours in upper division SA courses. The following courses are recommended.

SA 323-4 Symbol, Myth and Meaning

SA 386-4 Native Peoples and Public Policy

SA 401-4 The Politics of Culture in Contemporary Societies

SA 402-4 The Practice of Anthropology

SA 472-4 Anthropology and the Past

For students interested in pursuing a sociolinguistic focus, the following are highly recommended.

SA 350-4 Classical Sociological Thought

SA 355-4 Quantitative Methods

Certificate in First Nations Language Proficiency

This certificate program is intended for students who wish to acquire conversational and literacy skills in a particular First Nations language for purposes of teaching this language in elementary or secondary schools or to enhance their knowledge of a First Nations language for cultural reasons or professional objectives.

The certificate consists of 27 hours of course work. At least 12 of these must be earned by completing courses in the First Nations language itself.

The certificate can be taken on a full or part time basis. Advanced placement through course challenge to a maximum of nine credit hours is possible for those already fluent in their language. Credit may be applied to a specific language and is achieved by examination from an instructor in that language with the approval of the department.

Program Requirements

Students must complete or achieve equivalent credit for the following.

LING 130-3 Practical Phonetics

LING 220-3 Introduction to Linguistics

LING 231-3 Introduction to an Amerindian Language I*

LING 232-3 Introduction to an Amerindian Language II*

LING 331-3 Description and Analysis of a First Nations Language*

LING 332-3 Description and Analysis of a First Nations Language II*

In addition, students must complete at least nine credit hours selected from the following courses.

LING 241-3 Languages of the World

LING 260-3 Language, Culture and Society

LING 360-3 Linguistics and Language Teaching

LING 430-3 Native American Languages

LING 431-3 Language Structures I*

LING 432-3 Language Structures II*

*These courses may only be counted towards a certificate if the subject matter of each is the same First Nations language.

Certificate in Teaching ESL Linguistics

This certificate is for students preparing to teach English as a second language. While the certificate by itself is not a specific employment credential, it constitutes basic preparation for teaching English language skills in an environment in which some or all of the students are not native speakers of English. Those pursuing a career in teaching English as a second language (TESL) may wish to take more advanced studies upon completion of the program. The certificate provides preparation for further studies in applied linguistics and TESL.

The program generally requires at least four to five semesters to complete. The certificate may be earned concurrently with an honors, major, extended minor or minor in linguistics.

Monolingual students who have never studied any language other than English are strongly advised to take at least two courses (six credit hours) in a language other than English.

Admission Requirements

Students should apply in person to the undergraduate advisor. In addition to meeting the normal admission requirements of Simon Fraser University, students must have an excellent command of spoken and written English. Prospective applicants are advised that this requirement is more stringent than the University's minimum English language requirement. An interview will be required of students whose primary language is not English.

Program Requirements

The program requires successful completion of 31 credit hours as set out below, with a minimum grade point average of 2.0 calculated on the basis of grades in the specified required courses. As part of this program, students must complete a supervised practicum (LING 363) which includes 25 to 30 hours of experience in an adult ESL classroom.

Lower Division
Required courses

LING 110-3 The Wonder of Words

LING 130-3 Practical Phonetics

LING 200-3 Introduction to the Description of English Grammar

LING 220-3 Introduction to Linguistics

12 credit hours

plus two of

EDUC 220-3 Introduction to Educational Psychology

LING 221-3 Introduction to Phonology

LING 241-3 Languages of the World

LING 260-3 Language, Culture, and Society

6 credit hours

Upper Division
Required courses

EDUC 467-4 Curriculum and Instruction in Teaching English as a Second Language

LING 360-3 Linguistics and Language Teaching

LING 362-3 English as a Second Language: Theory

LING 363-3 English as a Second Language: Practice

13 credit hours

Recommended courses

EDUC 468-4 Cognition and Language in ESL Instruction

LING 350-3 First Language Acquisition

Post Baccalaureate Diploma in Teaching English as a Second Language

The Department of Linguistics and the Faculty of Education jointly offer this program. Students should apply to the departmental advisor for admission to the diploma program and should seek admission to the University separately. Applicants will be admitted by the joint steering committee made up of members of the Department of Linguistics and the Faculty of Education under the following general requirements.

Course Requirements

Students are required to complete a minimum of 31 credit hours chosen from the following three areas: linguistics, education, and individual and social development. The requirements are as follows.

Linguistics

The program requires an understanding of the general principles of linguistic theory and analysis, as well as the linguistic structure of the English language, and acquaintance with a wide range of structures typical of the languages of English learners.

Students are must take 12 credit hours in upper division linguistics courses, consisting of any two of

LING 321-3 Phonology

LING 322-3 Syntax

LING 323-3 Morphology

LING 324-3 Semantics

LING 330-3 Phonetics 6 credit hours

Note: Students whose undergraduate record includes at least 12 credit hours from the above list or their equivalents must select approved substitutes from among 400 level linguistics courses to fulfil the requirement of six credit hours in this section.

plus any two of

LING 360-3 Linguistics and Language Teaching

LING 362-3 English as a Second Language: Theory

LING 408-3 Field Linguistics

LING 431-3 Language Structures I

LING 432-3 Language Structures II

LING 441-3 Language Universals and Typology

LING 480-3 Topics in Linguistics I (when offered with a suitable topic)

LING 481-3 Topics in Linguistics II (when offered with a suitable topic) 6 credit hours

Note: Students who have already received credit for courses in this list through previous programs may not take them for further credit.

Education

Students in the program should be conversant with the principles of language pedagogy and be able to apply these as needed to various classroom situations; they should also have an understanding of the principles of testing and assessment and be able to apply these in classroom settings. Students are further required to have practical experience which is designed to develop classroom skills specific to teaching English to non-native speakers.

Students are required to complete all of

EDUC 467-4 Curriculum and Instruction in Teaching English as a Second Language

EDUC 470-4 Experience in Teaching Students Who Have Limited English Proficiency 8 credit hours

Note: Only students who have a current teaching placement should enrol in EDUC 470. In exceptional circumstances, alternative arrangements may be made after consultation with the steering committee.

plus 8-12 credit hours chosen from

EDUC 325-3 Assessment for Classroom Teaching

EDUC 341-3 Literacy, Education and Culture

EDUC 342-3 Contemporary Approaches to Literacy Instruction

EDUC 367-4 Teaching Children from Minority Language Backgrounds in Elementary Classrooms

EDUC 422-4 Learning Disabilities

EDUC 424-4 Learning Disabilities: Laboratory

EDUC 468-4 Cognition and Language in ESL Instruction 8-12 credit hours

Note: Students who have already received credit for courses in this list through previous programs may not take them again for further credit. Students who have prior credit for EDUC 467 or the equivalent will be required to select an alternative to that course from this list.

Individual and Social Development

Theories of human development and language use, their implications for the classroom, and of the sociocultural context of learners and speakers represents a basic component in the preparation for language teaching.

Students must complete any one of the following courses that has not been completed previously.

EDUC 320-3 Instructional Psychology

EDUC 326-3 Classroom Management and Discipline

EDUC 420-4 Cognitive Strategies in Learning

EDUC 422-4 Learning Disabilities

EDUC 425-4 School Counselling for the Classroom Teacher

EDUC 441-4 Multicultural Education

LING 350-3 First Language Acquisition

LING 409-3 Sociolinguistics

SA 400-4 Canadian Ethnic Minorities

3-4 credit hours

Language Training Institute

6204 Academic Quadrangle, 778.782 -4790 Tel, 778.782 -4989 Fax, www.sfu.ca/lti

Director

P. McFetridge BA, MA, PhD (S Fraser)

Associated Faculty

M. Escudero-Faust, Sociology and Anthropology

T. Heift, Linguistics

L. Kitching, Humanities

B. Ng, Linguistics

N. Omae, Linguistics

L. Zuccolo, Linguistics

Advisor

Ms. L. Hill, 6204 Academic Quadrangle, 778.782 4790

The Language Training Institute within the Department of Linguistics promotes the acquisition of language skills across the University and provides facilities for the support of language instruction on campus through the Language Learning Centre. The Faculty of Arts and extension credit programs of Continuing Studies collaborate through the Language Training Institute to provide credit and non-credit instruction in language skills for languages which lie outside of departmental programs.

Departments providing language instruction include the Department of French (FREN and ITAL) (see "Department of French".) and the Department of Linguistics (LING, for First Nations languages) (see "Department of Linguistics".).

The Institute offers courses in a number of languages: Chinese (CHIN), German (GERM), Japanese (JAPN), Spanish (SPAN), as well as other languages as needed from time to time under the general language course offerings (LANG):

LANG 100-149 (1-5) Introduction to a World Language I

LANG 150-199 (1-5) Introduction to a World Language II

LANG 200-249 (1-5) Intermediate Language Study I

LANG 250-299 (1-5) Intermediate Language Study II

Contact the Language Training Institute general office for further information regarding current offerings in any specific languages.

Language Learning Centre

3020 Academic Quadrangle, 778.782 -4698 Tel,

www.sfu.ca/language-learning-centre

The centre provides instructional support for language teaching through its laboratory facilities and materials library, and through consultation with language instructors and students. A multimedia language laboratory provides integrated computer, audio, and video resources in separate classroom and drop-in facilities.

Spanish Language Courses

Course Challenge

Up to 12 lower division Spanish credit hours may be challenged for credit. These include only SPAN 102, 103, 201 and 202. Students wishing to challenge any or all of these courses must register in the courses to be challenged and in a Spanish language course for which the course(s) challenged is a prerequisite. A grade of at least C in the higher level course must be obtained to receive the challenge credit.

Language Course Placement

Students with knowledge of the Spanish language may take a short test in order to be placed in a language course best suited to their abilities in Spanish. The test is also used to advise students of the possibility of obtaining advance placement or challenge credit. Please note that students will not usually be able to take courses below the level in which they have been placed. Native speakers of Spanish or students who received their secondary education entirely within a Spanish speaking community will not normally be admitted to a 100 or 200 level Spanish language course.

Students who have completed the Spanish 12 program in Canadian high schools will not be admitted to Spanish 102.

Call the Language Learning Centre to make a placement test appointment.

Certificate in Spanish Language Proficiency

This certificate program is intended for elementary and secondary school teachers and undergraduate students who wish to improve their oral written proficiency in Spanish. [Please note that Spanish is not considered a `teachable subject' for application to the professional development program (secondary).] It is also intended for anyone who wants to enhance their knowledge of the language for cultural reasons, professional needs, or who, for employment purposes, desire official certification of their proficiency in Spanish. This program, however, is not intended for native speakers of Spanish.

Full or part-time courses are offered on campus during the day and evening. Additionally, a sequential offering of courses is scheduled, subject to sufficient enrolment, at thet Harbour Centre campus each fall, spring, and summer semester.

Requirements

Students must successfully complete the following courses.

All of

LAS 100-3 Images of Latin America

SPAN 102-3 Introductory Spanish I

SPAN 103-3 Introductory Spanish II

SPAN 201-3 Intermediate Spanish I

SPAN 202-3 Intermediate Spanish II

SPAN 303-3 Spanish Conversation and Composition

SPAN 304-3 Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition

SPAN 305-3 Spanish for Business

plus one of

LAS 140-3 Cultural Heritage of Latin America

LAS 200-3 Introduction to Latin American Issues

LAS 300-3 Latin American Literature

Notes: It is possible to obtain exemption, up to a maximum of 12 credit hours, from lower division Spanish language courses through Advanced Placement, which is obtained by demonstrating equivalent preparation. The exempted courses must be replaced with credit obtained by

or

and/or

Students who gain or hope to gain exemption as outlined above should consult the program coordinator or the departmental assistant early in their program.

Credit gained toward this certificate may apply toward degree requirements under normal regulations but cannot be applied toward another Simon Fraser University certificate or diploma.

Co-operative Education

This program, for qualified students who wish to acquire practical experience in linguistics, entails planned semesters of study and employment in the student's choice of area.

To be eligible for admission to the co-operative education program, students must normally have completed 30 credit hours, including LING 130 and 220, and three other courses in linguistics. At least 15 of these 30 credit hours must be completed at Simon Fraser University with a minimum CGPA of 2.75.

College transfer students must complete at least 15 credit hours at Simon fraser University before becoming eligible for admission to the Co-operative Education Program and must satisfy the requirements given above, or their equivalents.

College transfer students who have participated in co-op programs elsewhere may be credited with the semester(s) already taken. The applicability of such semesters depends on the evaluation of the Department of Linguistics.

The following fours courses are completed during four work semesters.

LING 370-0 Linguistics Practicum I

LING 371-0 Linguistics Practicum II

LING 470-0 Linguistics Practicum III

LING 471-0 Linguistics Practicum IV

Arrangements for work semesters are made through the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator at least one semester in advance. See "Cooperative Education". for further details.

To continue in the program, students must maintain a minimum CGPA of 2.75 in the academic course work.

Interested students should contact the Department of Linguistics for further information and also see "Cooperative Education"..



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Index : searchable with the Find function in your web browser Calendar.pdfs Office of the Registrar / SFU
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