Effective Teaching Series

Join your colleagues to talk about teaching! This series provides faculty members and instructors with an informal space to talk about teaching-related issues. Each session begins with a complimentary lunch, followed by a presentation led by a faculty member or instructor. A concluding question-and-answer segment provides room for discussion.

Collaborative Learning: Two-stage Tests to Support Student Learning and Experience

Facilitator: Megan Barker (Biological Sciences)

As we move towards more active approaches in our classrooms, one goal of effective teaching is to align our testing with our practices. One useful tool is “two-stage” testing, also called “collaborative testing,” in which students first complete the test individually and then join a group for the second stage. Two-stage testing has positive impacts on a variety of student outcomes, including learning, motivation, confidence and inclusion. Several approaches exist, and this workshop is your chance to figure out how to make these assessments work in your context.

During this interactive workshop, we will:

  1. Identify the goals and evidence behind two-stage tests
  2. Describe the process of two-stage tests and their many varieties
  3. Consider challenges and solutions to help make this approach successful across a broad spectrum of classrooms and students

Novices and veterans from all disciplines and course levels (undergraduate and graduate) are welcome!

Spring 2019

Fri, January 25 | 12:30–2:30
Halpern Centre 114

   Open until filled
   tlcevent@sfu.ca

Active Learning in Your Classroom: Tips and Tricks to Increase Student Engagement and Learning 

Facilitator: Megan Barker (Biological Sciences)

We are all working to be the best possible instructors for our students. However, it can be difficult to find tools that work in our diverse courses and with our own instructional styles—and that are achievable within busy schedules. If this tension resonates with you, then we have a 90-minute boot camp to help! In this workshop, we’ll help you find approaches to make your course more active without requiring a complete course overhaul. We’ll briefly discuss the evidence behind active approaches and generate ideas to support the goals and overcome the challenges in your own teaching. You’ll come away with a tool kit of useful approaches, ready to be implemented in your next class!

Novices and veterans from all disciplines and course levels (undergraduate and graduate) are welcome!

Spring 2019

Fri, February 1 | 12:30–2:30
Halpern Centre 114, Burnaby campus

   Open until filled
   tlcevent@sfu.ca

Potlatch as Methodology

Facilitator: Dr. Justin Wilson (Aboriginal Studies, Langara College)

Potlatch as Methodology is a culturally and spiritually based approach used to symbolically invite diverse participants (Indigenous, international and domestic alike) to co-create a home away from home that helps facilitate greater learning outcomes.

Dr. Justin Wilson is a professor of Aboriginal Studies and is currently department chair at Langara College. His community work includes co-chairing the Federation of Post-Secondary Educators Decolonization, Reconciliation and Indigenization committee, and he was part of the British Columbia Open Campus project team that created Pulling Together: A Guide for Indigenization of Post-Secondary Institutions , for which he helped draft curriculum. He describes himself as an intercultural father of three who is happily married and describes himself as a 16-year-old dad. His research interests include (a) transformative learning, (b) resiliency, (c) personal leadership and (d) intercultural communication among others.

Spring 2019

Fri, February 8 | 12:30–2:30
Diamond Alumni Centre

   Open until filled
   tlcevent@sfu.ca

Diversity, Adversity, Perversity, and the University

Facilitator: Dave Geary (Capilano University)

This will be a fun and engaging workshop to inspire participants to do a diversity audit on images, videos and other class materials that they use day-to-day in classrooms. A short presentation will explore examples of how images and videos used in classroom presentations can promote diversity (racial, sexual, gender, ability) without necessarily being the subject of the course. Participants will have an opportunity to brainstorm ways they can use images, videos, literature excerpts, guest speakers and other resources in class to promote diversity and to share their ideas with colleagues in the workshop.

Spring 2019

Fri, March 8 | 12:30–2:30
Halpern Centre 114, Burnaby campus

   Open until filled
   tlcevent@sfu.ca

Indigenizing Course Outcomes: Updating your Syllabus to Use the Medicine Wheel as a Curriculum Design Framework

Facilitators: Marcella LaFever (University of the Fraser Valley) and Justin Wilson (Langara College)

NOTE: SFU faculty members who attend this workshop must be teaching a credit course and are required to bring a course syllabus to the workshop to examine ways to indigenize course outcome goals and activities.

Bring your course syllabus to this workshop to examine ways you can indigenize course outcome goals and activities. In December 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada released its calls to action for reconciliation related to the oppressive legacy of Indian Residential Schools. Required actions for educators include incorporation of indigenous ways of knowing and learning. Current curriculum design practices have primarily been developed from euro-centric traditions based in three domains of learning referred to as Bloom’s taxonomy. This workshop uses the Medicine Wheel, a teaching/learning framework that has widespread use in indigenous communities, for use in designing course outcome statements. Bloom’s taxonomy of the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains is missing the fourth quadrant of the Medicine Wheel, spiritual.  

 

Presenter bios

Dr. Marcella LaFever, PhD (University of New Mexico, 2005), is an associate professor in Communications at the University of the Fraser Valley. Marcella, in examining the implications for herself to decolonize her communication practices, has focused her ongoing research program on listening to indigenous voices that have been saying for a long time what colonizers need to do to change their attitudes and practices. Marcella’s main program of research focuses on the social exclusion that results in public dialogue and decision-making where cultural ways of speaking are outside the norms expected in dominant North American culture. Her 9P Planning model posits a process that builds intercultural relationships to increase social inclusion in public dialogue. Dr. LaFever’s other current work is in two areas of intercultural communication: use of First Nation storytelling as a form of dialogic participation; and indigenization of classroom instructional practices.

Dr. Justin Wilson is a professor of Aboriginal Studies and is currently department chair at Langara College. His community work includes co-chairing the Federation of Post-Secondary Educators Decolonization, Reconciliation and Indigenization committee, and he was part of the British Columbia Open Campus project team called Pulling Together: A Guide for Indigenization of Post-Secondary Institutions, of which he helped draft curriculum. He describes himself as an intercultural father of three, is happily married and describes himself as a 16-year-old dad. His research interests include (a) transformative learning, (b) resiliency and personal leadership and (c) intercultural communication among others.

Spring 2019

Fri, March 22 | 12:30–4:00*
Halpern Centre 126, Burnaby campus
*NOTE: This is an extended session.

   No deadline
   tlcevent@sfu.ca