Upper-Division B-Designated Courses of Interest to Upper-Level and Transfer Students

The following list of courses offered at the upper division are labelled Breadth-Humanities, Breadth-Social Science, or Breadth-Science. Typically these courses have only a maturing prerequisite (a set number of credit hours that must be completed prior to registering). Some may waive prerequisites at the discretion of the instructor or department.

**Please note: Course designations approved after September 2006 are noted in the lists below with italicized effective dates. Designations are NOT retroactive; they are effective as of the first offering after Senate approval.**

Last updated 16 March 2018.

Courses are listed alphabetically. Check Course Schedules each term for offerings of (and possible prerequisites for) the following courses:

ARCH 301-3 Ancient Visual Art - B-Hum

  • Art styles and traditions of prehistoric and preliterate peoples in one or more world cultural areas.

BISC 371-3 Special Topics in Biology for Non-majors - B-Sci

  • Selected topics in Biology, aimed at students who might not have a background in biology. Science students may take this course as an elective, but may not apply this course toward their upper division program requirements. Prerequisite: A minimum of 45 units.

BISC 372 Brewing Science - B-Sci - effective January 2018; note: 2-unit course, no lab

  • This interdisciplinary course exposes students to the science and art of brewing, including the ingredients and process of brewing. Discussion of malting, barley and hop cultivation, and yeast fermentation, as it relates to the brewing process, as well as business, advertising, marketing of beer will be included. Prerequisite: 60 units. Students with credit for BISC 374 may not take this course for further credit. Students who have completed BISC 372 ST-Brewing Science may not take BISC 373 for further credit. Students may not count this course toward their Biological Science Honours, Majors, or Minor requirements.

BISC 374 Brewing Science with Lab - B-Sci - effective January 2018

  • This interdisciplinary course exposes students to the science and art of brewing, including the ingredients and process of brewing. Discussion of malting, barley and hop cultivation, and yeast fermentation, as it relates to the brewing process, as well as business, advertising, marketing of beer will be included. With lab. Prerequisite: 60 units. Students with credit for BISC 373 may not take this course for further credit. Students who have completed BISC 372 ST-Brewing Science may not take BISC 374 for further credit. Students may not count this course toward their Biological Sciences Honours, Majors, or Minor requirements.

CA 317-4 Introduction to Performance Studies - B-Hum

  • Traces the interdisciplinary origins of performance studies and brings its concepts and methods to bear on dance, music, theatre, performance art, and media performance. Prerequisite: minimum of 45 units, including FPA 111 or another critical or history course within the School for Contemporary Arts; or by prior approval. Students who have taken FPA 311-4 Interdisciplinary Studies in the Arts/Introduction to Performance Studies during the 2007/3 and 2008/3 terms cannot take this course for further credit.

CA 357-4 Context of Theatre II - B-Hum 

  • A conceptual approach to a selected body of dramatic work. The detailed structural analysis of dramatic texts, their historical context, their development and production histories. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the evolving relationship between theatre and its audience. May be of particular interest to students in other departments. Prerequisite: 24 lower division units or prior approval.

CMPT 320-3 Social Implications in a Computerized Society - B-Sci

  • An examination of social processes that are being automated and implications for good and evil, that may be entailed in the automation of procedures by which goods and services are allocated. Examination of what are dehumanizing and humanizing parts of systems and how systems can be designed to have a humanizing effect. Prerequisite: a course in computing science and 45 units. Students with credit for CMPT 260 may not take CMPT 320 for further credit.

CRIM 301-3 Crime in Contemporary Society - B-Soc

  • Contemporary issues, problems and themes pertinent to the field of criminology. Development, character and function of criminology as an academic and professional discipline. Status of criminology in the Canadian context. Selected issues of the study of crime, law and justice which will vary depending on instructor. This course may not be taken by students who are majoring or minoring in Criminology.

CRIM 315-3 Restorative Justice - B-Soc

  • This course will contrast restorative justice with the dominant adversarial/retributive/punitive model of justice through a critical analysis of these two paradigms of justice. Several key principles, assumptions, and concepts necessary for understanding the foundation and practice of restorative justice will be introduced and explored. Prerequisite: 45 units.

CRIM 355-3 The Forensic Sciences - B-Soc

  • Examines the use and interpretation of physical forensic evidence in court. It will critically examine and evaluate the major forensic sciences used in criminal investigations today, as well as look at the crime scene. Subjects examined will include forensic pathology, odontology, biology, DNA evidence, firearms evidence, toxicology chemistry and questioned documents. Techniques will be illustrated with case studies. Prerequisite: 45 units.

DIAL 390W-5 Undergraduate Semester: Dialogue - W and B-Soc or B-Hum

  • The Dialogue component of the Undergraduate Semester in Dialogue will immerse students in the art and practice of thinking and communicating. The focus will be on strategies and methods to use in understanding diverse perspectives. Students will have an opportunity to expand their verbal and written communication skills as well as explore dialogue as a developing academic field. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students should apply prior to the term in which they wish to enrol. Students can be accepted into either the Summer Institute in Dialogue (DIAL 390W and 391W, 10 units) or the Undergraduate Semester in Dialogue (fall or spring term, DIAL 390W, 391W and 392W, 15 units), but not both.

DIAL 391W-5 Undergraduate Semester: Seminar - W and B-Soc or B-Hum

  • Topics covered each term will vary, but generally each course will examine a subject that encourages broad approaches and probes provocative issues. The course will consist of discussions led by faculty, frequent visits from relevant off-campus experts, a heavy reading load, and a number of individual and group student projects. Learning will be active rather than passive, stimulating students to research, explore and discuss rather than following a lecture format. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students should apply prior to the term in which they wish to enrol. Students can be accepted into either the Summer Institute in Dialogue (DIAL 390W and 391W, 10 units) or the Undergraduate Semester in Dialogue (fall or spring semester, DIAL 390W, 391W and 392W, 15 units) but not both.

DIAL 392W-5 Undergraduate Semester: Final Project - W and B-Soc or B-Hum

  • For their final project, each student will produce a manuscript suitable for submission to a major public media outlet on a topic relevant to the course focus for that term. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students should apply prior to the term in which they wish to enrol. Students can be accepted into either the Summer Institute in Dialogue (DIAL 390W and 391W, 10 units) or the Undergraduate Semester in Dialogue (fall or spring semester, DIAL 390W, 391W and 392W, 15 units), but not both.

EDUC 311-3 Foundations in Aboriginal Education, Language, and Culture - B-Hum

  • An introduction to Aboriginal education in Canada and BC. There will be a critical examination of historical and contemporary issues in education and an exploration of culturally based Aboriginal education grounded in Aboriginal philosophies. Prerequisite: 60 units.

EDUC 341-3 Literacy, Education and Culture - B-Hum

  • An introduction to the study of literacy from an interdisciplinary perspective, one which explores the role of literacy in social development, the economic and cultural values of literacy, and the effects of literacy on cognitive processes. The particular concern of this course is with the formal transmission of literacy in educational institutions. The course will especially address the varying conceptions of literacy that educators have traditionally valued, and the research that aims to explain, justify, and prescribe educational practices intended to increase literacy. This course is required for the certificate in literacy instruction. Prerequisite: 60 units.

EDUC 452-8 Environmental Education - Q and B-Sci

  • Examines the educational problems entailed in developing human awareness and understanding of the environment. Explores environmental issues through a multi-disciplinary approach and relates historical and contemporary problems in human-environment interactions to school curricula from the elementary to the secondary level. Includes a laboratory component. Grading will be on a pass/fail basis. A $147.86 field activity fee will be levied in this course. Normally offered in summer session only. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402 or corequisite EDUC 403. Students who have credit for EDUC 454 may not complete EDUC 452 for further credit.

ENGL 383-3 Studies in Popular Literature and Culture - B-Hum

  • A study of popular literature and its cultural contexts. May be defined by genre, author, period, or critical approach. Prerequisite: 45 units. This course may be repeated for credit if a different topic is taught, though students who obtained credit for ENGL 363 prior to Summer 2015 may not take this course for further credit.

ENGL 398-3 Major Authors for Non-majors - B-Hum

  • In-depth study of the literature of a major anglophone author of wide influence. Course is not intended for English majors, minors, extended minors, joint majors, or honours. May be repeated for credit once if different topic is taught. Prerequisite: 45 units. English majors, minors, extended minors, joint majors, and honours may take this course with permission of the instructor.

ENV/ENSC 412-3 Technologies, Cultures and a Sustainable World - B-Soc or B-Sci

  • Technology issues relevant to global sustainable development are considered from engineering, historical and anthropological perspectives. Topics include hydroelectric dams, alternative power generation systems, and the science of climate change. In-depth case studies emphasize interdisciplinary exploration of these themes. Students wishing B-Soc credit should take ENV 412; for B-Sci credit take ENSC 412. Prerequisite: Minimum 60 credit hours. Students may take only one of ENV 412 and ENSC 412 for credit.

ENV 452-8 Environmental Education - Q and B-Sci

  • Examines problems entailed in developing awareness and understanding of the environment. Explores issues through a multi-disciplinary approach and develops an understanding of challenges, opportunities, strategies and possible solutions. Includes a laboratory component. Students may be required to complete a Criminal Record Check. Prerequisite: 90 units. Students with credit for EDUC 452 may not take this course for further credit.

FNST 332-3 Ethnobotony of British Columbia First Nations - B-Sci

  • This course is an introduction to the study of plant knowledge and use by First Nations peoples in British Columbia. It provides students with information about the role of plants in First Nations' cultures including such areas as foods, medicines, technology, ceremony, ecological indicators, and within First Nations' knowledge and classification systems. Special focus may be placed on the ethnobotany of one or more Aboriginal groups or culture areas. Prerequisite: FNST 101 or by permission of the department.

FREN 330-3 Francophone World - B-Hum

  • A multidisciplinary analysis of socio-cultural aspects of French speaking countries, involving written work and oral participation. Prerequisite: FREN 206 or 222, or permission of the instructor.

GEOG 318-4 Soils in Our Environment - B-Sci

  • A survey of soils and their management. Focuses on the role of soils in the environment; their physical, chemical and biological properties; processes of degradation (including erosion, desertification, pollution, and nutrient depletion); and the maintenance of healthy soils. Prerequisite: completion of 45 units including GEOG 111. Students who have taken GEOG 317 may not take this course for further credit.

GERO 300-3 Introduction to Gerontology - B-Soc

  • Examination of the aging process from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Physical and health factors in aging, economic and vocational factors in aging, family and community relations of older people, social policy and politics of aging. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on normal aging. Prerequisite: 60 units. Students who have taken GERO 101 may not take this course for credit.

GSWS 316-4 Disciplining Sex: Feminist Science Studies and Sociobiology - B-Hum or B-Soc or B-Sci

  • Conceptualizations of sex have played a fundamental part in the development of evolutionary theories in biology and psychology. At the same time, feminist critiques of these conceptualizations have been a major factor in the development of Feminist Science Studies. The interactions amongst these three approaches are examined, including methodologies, communities of practice and societal implications. Prerequisite: 30 units.

HIST 373-4 Conquest in North America, 1500-1900 - B-Hum

  • A broad examination of attempts by aboriginal, imperial, and mercantile forces to claim and control the North American continent from the arrival of Spanish conquistadors in the early 1500s to the surrender of Geronimo in 1886. Explores the processes of colonization from many perspectives, including Aboriginal, American, English, French, Russian, and Spanish ambitions and activities. Prerequisite: 45 units including 9 units of lower division History credits and one of HIST 101 or 212, or permission of the department.

HUM 302W-4 The Golden Age of Greece: An Integrated Society - B-Hum and W

  • The study of Athenian society in the 5th century BC, a period unique in the record of human achievement during which virtually all the major humanistic fields were either initiated or received significant new impetus. Prerequisite: 45 units.

HUM 303-4 The Latin Humanist Tradition - B-Hum

  • Studies in the writings of various Latin authors. Prerequisite: 45 units.

HUM 305-4 Medieval Studies - B-Hum

  • A detailed interdisciplinary analysis of a selected topic, issue, or personality in the Middle Ages. Prerequisite: 45 units.

HUM 307-4 Carolingian Civilization - B-Hum

  • A focused interdisciplinary study of the Carolingian civilization achieved in early medieval Europe under Charlemagne and his family. Prerequisite: 45 units.

HUM 309-4 Literature and the Arts Across Cultures - B-Hum

  • An interdisciplinary study of literary texts in translation and/or art forms across cultures and periods. Includes a variety of approaches and themes such as translation studies, narrative theory, cultural analysis, global citizenship, modernity, postmodernity. Students who have taken this topic under HUM 381 or 382 may not take this course for further credit. Prerequisite: 45 units.

HUM 311-4 Italian Renaissance Humanism - B-Hum

  • A study of the major writings, cultural milieu, and influence of the humanist movement of the Italian Renaissance. Prerequisite: 45 units.

HUM 312W-4 Renaissance Studies - B-Hum and W

  • A detailed interdisciplinary analysis of a selected topic, issue, or personality from the Italian and/or Northern Renaissance. Prerequisite: 45 units.

HUM 320-4 The Humanities and Philosophy - B-Hum

  • An exploration of the characteristic ways in which the humanities, with its emphasis on expression, belief and tradition, presents the important philosophical concepts of western civilization. Based upon an interdisciplinary selection of texts drawn from history, philosophy, literature and the arts. Prerequisite: 45 units.

HUM 321W-4 The Humanities and Critical Thinking - B-Hum and W

  • A study of the counter-traditions within western civilization. Compares and contrasts diverse traditions within western culture that critique its central value systems. It will focus on the attempts of great artists and thinkers to break with tradition, and the subsequent creation of new ideas and forms of experience and expression. Prerequisite: 45 units.

HUM 325-4 The Humanities and the Natural World - B-Hum

  • A study of the humanistic, scientific, political, and ideological discourses deriving from concern with the natural environment. Using classic and contemporary sources, this course examines the interaction of humans with the non-human world, and includes such topics as human communities and nature, the immersion of the individual in nature, nature and the human habitat. Prerequisite: 45 units.

HUM 330-4 Religion in Context - B-Hum

  • An in-depth investigation of a specific case of religious history and tradition. Religion will be studied through the cultural and historical contexts that pervade and structure religious meaning and expression. Prerequisite: 45 units.

HUM 331-4 Studies in Asian Religions - B-Hum

  • Studies in the history and traditions of specific Asian religions through the cultural and historical contexts that structure religious meaning. Prerequisite: 45 units.

HUM 332-4 Mythology in Context - B-Hum

  • A detailed multidisciplinary study of the role of mythology within a particular culture or tradition. Prerequisite: 45 units. Recommended: HUM 102.

HUM 340-4 Great Cities in Their Time - B-Hum

  • An exploration of the cultural and intellectual accomplishments of a specific city that achieved prominence in a particular time period, and had substantial impact and influence on human civilization. Examines the political, social, religious, and cultural factors that help to explain a city's significance and investigates the achievements of its citizens. Prerequisite: 45 units.

HUM 350-4 Great Figures in the Humanistic Tradition - B-Hum

  • An interdisciplinary study of the life and works of a man or woman who has made a lasting contribution to the humanistic tradition in more than one field of endeavor (e.g. philosophy, politics, literature, economics, religion). This course may be repeated once for credit. Students who have taken this topic under another Humanities course number cannot take this course for further credit. Prerequisite: 45 units.

HUM 360-4 Great Themes in the Humanistic Tradition - B-Hum

  • An interdisciplinary study of a selected theme that has made a lasting contribution to the humanistic tradition in more than one field of endeavour (e.g. philosophy, politics, literature,economics, religion). This course may be repeated once for credit. Students who have taken this topic under another Humanities course number cannot take this course for further credit. Prerequisite: 45 units.

HUM 422-4 The Humanities and the Critique of Culture - B-Hum

  • Focuses on the role and practice of cultural critique in the humanities based upon a selection of materials and analytical texts across disciplines. Prerequisite: 45 units including HUM 101.

MBB 301-3 Bioscience of Science Fiction - B-Sci or B-Hum

  • Students from all faculties (including science) will work together in a team-based approach to understand the fundamentals of cell biology and molecular biology in the context of science fiction literature. Prerequisite: Minimum of 30 units.

MBB 302-3 Energy: From Cells to Society - B-Sci

  • Energy sustains life, from early cells, through molecular machines and ecosystems, to industrial society. Social issues, such as the search for extraterrestrial life, obesity, death and climate change will provide context for understanding the science of energy. Prerequisite: 45 units.

PHIL 300-3 Introduction to Philosophy - B-Hum

  • An introductory course specifically intended for students in other departments who have at least 60 semester hours credit. This course is more advanced than 100 and 200 division courses and is of interest to students not only in the humanities, but also in the natural and social sciences. Prerequisite: at least 60 units. Normally, students with credit for PHIL 100 may not take this course for further credit. This course does not count towards the upper division requirements for a student pursuing a minor, major, or honors program in Philosophy.

SA 302W-4 Global Problems and the Culture of Capitalism - B-Soc and W

  • An introduction to the political economy and culture of capitalism in relation to global problems. Case studies may focus on issues of population, famine, disease, poverty, environmental destruction, social inequality, and nation-state violence. Resistance, rebellion and social movements in response to these problems also will be addressed. Highly Recommended: SA 101 or SA 150.

SA 418-4 International Health: Global Policies and Local Realities - B-Soc

  • An investigation of the social, cultural, and political issues that contribute to problems of ill-health in resource-poor countries and the major efforts in international public health to address these problems. It explores the application of knowledge about social, and especially gender relations in international health, with particular attention to local perspectives and grassroots initiatives. Institutional frameworks intended to promote health development are examined in historical and contemporary perspective through case studies on topics such as: malaria, population control, maternal health, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis. Prerequisite: minimum 72 units, including SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Highly recommended: SA 218, 302 and 318.

SCI 300-3 Science and Its Impact on Society - B-Sci

  • The impact of science in our society. This course introduces upper level university students to all facets of science and their resulting technologies. Governmental policies often involve far-reaching scientific/technological decisions and this course attempts to provide a scientific perspective to help achieve rational and effective policies. Prerequisite: 60 units. Not open to students in the Faculty of Science or the Schools of Computing Science and Engineering Science.

SD 381-4 Sustainable Community Development Theory and Practice - B-Soc

  • A theoretical foundation for understanding sustainable development at the community level; including an integrated approach to environmental, economic, and social aspects of development. Emphasizes economic and policy instruments, and planning tools, for engaging in and implementing SCD. Prerequisite: SCD certificate program approval and CED, or SCD 201, or SCD diploma program approval, or completion of 60 units, or permission of the Director for SCD. Students who have taken CED or SCD 301 for credit may not take this course for further credit.

WL 303-4 Global Culture and Its Discontents - B-Hum

  • Explores the tendencies of globalization in the cultural realm, which while sparking cross-border communication, also tends to flatten identities into a coercive global norm. Focuses on writing in contexts of political oppression, digital communities, censorship, cultural displacement, terrorism and/or warfare. Prerequisite: 45 units.

WL 304-4 Exile and Migration - B-Hum

  • Explores the culture of peoples and individuals displaced by force or migrating by choice. May focus on the literary cultures of exiles and emigres or on the depiction of refugees, immigrants or exiles. Prerequisite: 45 units.

WL 305-4 Sages and Poets - B-Hum and W

  • Explores wisdom literature, poetry, or the resonance of faith in secular world literatures. May focus on cross-cultural mystical quests, secular re-castings of narratives of faith and conversion, or the interplay of the religious and the secular in comparative supernatural literatures. Prerequisite: 45 units.

WL 306-4 Transnational Literacy Rebellions - B-Hum

  • Investigates cross-cultural literary movements that challenge the status quo. Focal points might include romanticism, modernism, existentialism, or other cultural and political tendencies, with attention to how such styles or movements gain impetus in new national/regional settings. This course may be repeated for credit when different topics are offered. Prerequisite: 45 units.

WL 307-4 Creative Writing in World Literature - B-Hum

  • A creative writing workshop focusing on students' production of original works, translingual writing, and/or literary translation. This course may be repeated for credit when different topics are offered. Prerequisite: 45 units.

WL 308-4 Travel and Trade - B-Hum

  • Explores how travel and trade contribute to literary history and the exchange of ideas across space. May focus on chronicles of discovery, travel writing, accounts of religious pilgrimage, mythical quest narratives, or other literary texts dealing with the traveler's experience of cross-cultural encounter. This course may be repeated for credit when different topics are offered. Prerequisite: 45 units.

WL 309-4 Empire and Resistance - B-Hum

  • Explores post-imperial notions of culture and universality, tradition and modernity, or nation and cosmopolis. May focus on narratives of independence, postcolonial self-fashioning, and imperial nostalgia. Prerequisite: 45 units.

WL 320-4 Interdisciplinary Approaches to World Literature - B-Hum

  • Intermediate seminar on the intersections between World Literature and other modes of cultural expression, or other academic disciplines. May focus on different methodological approaches to World Literature, for instance gender, cultural, or performance studies. Alternatively, may explore literature in relation to music, theatre, film, the visual arts, or digital humanities. This course may be repeated for credit when different topics are offered. Prerequisite: 45 units.