media release

SFU improves access for top Indian students

November 18, 2011
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Andrew Petter is available for interviews as his travel schedule allows. To arrange an interview, please contact Dixon Tam, 778.782.8742, dixont@sfu.ca, or Marianne Meadahl, 778.782.9017, marianne_meadahl@sfu.ca.

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Simon Fraser University president Andrew Petter today announced several initiatives to attract top students from India’s Delhi Public Schools (DPS) to study in Canada.

Meeting today with DPS officials and students, Petter announced that beginning next year an SFU India Entrance Scholarship will be created to provide a top DPS graduate with $10,000 to help with tuition and other expenses. The annual award requires a minimum 95 per cent academic average.

The scholarship will be awarded in two $5,000 installments, with a Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of 3.0 necessary for the second disbursement. The prize also includes a $1,000 travel allowance.

“This scholarship recognizes SFU’s longstanding relationship with Delhi Public Schools and our mutual commitment to creating further opportunities for their outstanding students to study in Canada,” Petter said during a visit to Ghaziabad, located east of New Delhi.

Petter is travelling throughout India as part of the B.C. government’s current trade mission to South Asia. He is meeting with new and existing academic and industry partners to help position SFU as Canada’s “bridge to India."

SFU will also explore with Delhi Public Schools two additional initiatives. The first would establish an annual major entrance scholarship to recognize high academic standing as well as a commitment to school and community service, leadership, volunteer activity, the arts and/or athletics.

The second would create a summer institute to provide opportunities for high school students to spend several weeks at SFU, living in residence and participating in activities inside and outside the classroom.

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12 comments
why isn't this money being invested in local talent or students?
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why isn't this money being invested in local talent or students?
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I'm pretty sure there are students in BC who would love to get a $10,000 scholarship to SFU. But it isn't politically correct to help our own citizens first anymore. We have no obligation to India or China or to help their students first. If anyone has a problem with that, it's simple, don't come to our universities then. There is a reason our universities are ranked the highest in the world for the past several hundred years.
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I'm pretty sure there are students in BC who would love to get a $10,000 scholarship to SFU. But it isn't politically correct to help our own citizens first anymore. We have no obligation to India or China or to help their students first. If anyone has a problem with that, it's simple, don't come to our universities then. There is a reason our universities are ranked the highest in the world for the past several hundred years.
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As others have mentioned I do not know what the rationale is ..
Most likely a political move and nothing to do with attracting talents ...
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LOL you guys realize that the students who would get the scholarships are probably brighter then the majority of students already at SFU ? Ignorance is bliss eh
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@Karn... Funny, if these students were really brighter than all of us at SFU, they wouldn't be coming here to study then would they? I would pit the top students in Canada against those in India anyday.
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Dear Harold and "me",

As an International student from India who received a similar scholarship, I would like to happily inform you that the average tuition + fees that I pay for a semester with 4 or 5 courses is $6,900 - $7,500. Such a scholarship was not even able to sustain me (only tuition-wise... living expenses, etc. were extra) for 2 semesters. What I have paid in tuition in the past 3.5 years is approximately 2.75 times what a local "talent" would pay; you might think of it as SFU getting ~3 students' tuition from a single student. You can see why SFU is attracting "talent" from abroad. Education is a business - and that is a sad thing regardless of whether you are local or from overseas.

And just for the record, because of the population, the competitive nature of Indian schools and the level of education which is a lot more advanced than than in North America, top Indian high school students in general would outperform their North American counterparts anyday. It's not a question of who is more intelligent or talented; simply a case of who has more received more education. Plus bigger population = higher instances of talented kids. Just my two cents.
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Well "International student", the claim that "Indian" students outperform their north american counterparts is anecdotal. Depends on where you live, and what school it was. However, once you move past "public" school, and get into higher education, regardless of where you live, most Canadian graduate students routinely outperform students from India and China. It's not just an A average in the real world, it's research skills, literary skills, interviewing skills. Most foreign students have a hard time even presenting in a group.

It's not my fault you pay three times more than SFU students. That's life. If you cannot pay that much, stay at the universities in India. They'd be happy to have you.
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Well "International student", the claim that "Indian" students outperform their north american counterparts is anecdotal. Depends on where you live, and what school it was. However, once you move past "public" school, and get into higher education, regardless of where you live, most Canadian graduate students routinely outperform students from India and China. It's not just an A average in the real world, it's research skills, literary skills, interviewing skills. Most foreign students have a hard time even presenting in a group.

It's not my fault you pay three times more than SFU students. That's life. If you cannot pay that much, stay at the universities in India. They'd be happy to have you.
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@Harold - the reason these students come to Canada instead of staying in India is because they are better opportunities here for them to really make use of just how bright they are. They come to SFU instead of staying in India because Indian schools probably aren't ENOUGH of a challenge for them. Sadly, I'm not even surprised by your comments or anyone else's though. That's just how ignorant people react to what they can't have. If you're all so concerned with the fact that foreign students are being given opportunities to come here with scholarships, instead of complaining about it and saying they "shouldn't come to our universities" why don't you step up your own game and study harder? Last I checked SFU still gave out scholarships to Canadian students who do exceptionally well. Instead of spreading negativity, put the talent you claim to have to use and get yourself a scholarship with SFU.
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if u conduct any entrance exam or ielts is enough.................
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