Here are English 322 schedules and course policy. I've also added, for your information, the final exam from the last time I taught the course.


English 322

LECTURE SCHEDULE 1996-3

Mon. Sept. 9 Introduction to the 18th Century, and to the novel

Mon. Sept. 16 Fielding,Tom Jones

Mon. Sept. 23 Tom Jones

Mon. Sept. 30 Tom Jones

Mon. Oct. 7 Defoe, Moll Flanders [3 x 5 proposals due]

Mon. Oct. 14 THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY - No classes

Mon. Oct. 21 Moll Flanders

Mon. Oct. 28 Richardson, Clarissa [proposals approved]

Mon. Nov. 4 Clarissa

Mon. Nov. 11 REMEMBRANCE DAY - No Classes

Mon. Nov. 18 Jane Austen, Emma TERM PAPERS DUE

Mon. Nov. 25 Emma

Mon. Dec. 2 Emma

How to contact me:

Office hours:

Monday 10.30-11.30

Wednesday 11.30-12.30, 3.30-4.30

and by appointment.

Office phone: 291 3220

Fax: 264 9904

E-mail: delany@sfu.ca

English 322 e-mail group: engl 322-all@sfu.ca

URL: http://www.sfu.ca/~delany/


Tutorial I

SCHEDULE 1996-3

Mon. Sept. 16 Fielding, Tom Jones

Mon. Sept. 23 Tom Jones

Mon. Sept. 30 Tom Jones

Mon. Oct. 7 Defoe, Moll Flanders

Mon. Oct. 14 THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY - No classes

Mon. Oct. 21 Moll Flanders - MIDTERM

Mon. Oct. 28 Richardson, Clarissa

Mon. Nov. 4 Clarissa

Mon. Nov. 11 REMEMBRANCE DAY - No Classes

Mon. Nov. 18 Jane Austen, Emma

Mon. Nov. 25 Emma

Mon. Dec. 2 Emma


Tutorials II and III

SCHEDULE 1996-3

Wed. Sept. 11 Fielding, Tom Jones

Wed. Sept. 18 Tom Jones

Wed. Sept. 25 Tom Jones

Wed. Oct. 2 Defoe, Moll Flanders

Wed. Oct. 9 Moll Flanders

Wed. Oct. 16 Moll Flanders - MIDTERM

Wed. Oct. 23 Richardson, Clarissa

Wed. Oct. 30 Clarissa

Wed. Nov. 6 Clarissa

Wed. Nov. 13 Jane Austen, Emma

Wed. Nov. 20 Emma

Wed. Nov. 27 Emma


English 322, Summer 1995

FINAL EXAMINATION

Two and a half hours, open book. Answer any two questions. Show detailed knowledge of at least three novels.

1. Knightley says of Emma’s likeness of Harriet: “You have made her too tall.” (75) Discuss, in any novel or pair of novels, the problem of seeing people as they “really are.” Consider, in your answer, the role played by the author’s distinctive prose style.

2. “In the old England, the curious blood-connection held the classes together. The squires might be arrogant, violent, bullying and unjust, yet in some ways they were at one with the people, part of the same blood-stream. We feel it in Defoe or Fielding. And then, in the mean Jane Austen, it is gone. Already this old maid typifies Ćpersonality’ instead of character, the sharp knowing in apartness instead of knowing in togetherness, and she is, to my feeling, thoroughly unpleasant, English in the bad, mean, snobbish sense of the word, just as Fielding is English in the good, generous sense.”

D.H. Lawrence, “A Propos of Lady Chatterley’s Lover

As usual, Lawrence’s criticism is brilliant, sweeping, and unfair. Give your response, beginning with the words: “Yes, but . . . ”

3. Imagine that Clarissa Harlowe files a complaint against Lovelace with the magistrate Henry Fielding; provide a court report of the preliminary hearing, with both Clarissa and Lovelace present.

4. Compare Tom Jones and Frank Churchill: their adoption into a wealthy family, their love affairs, their eventual fate.

5. Consider the strategies adopted by Moll Flanders, as a woman facing an uncertain and dangerous world; compare her with another heroine, to show how the status of women has changed, for better or worse.


English 322

ASSIGNMENT AND EVALUATION POLICIES

Philosophy. A grade is a formal judgement of your work for which, if asked, I should be able to give reasons. All good universities that I know of have a grading system, and all of us make constant evaluations as part of the business of life. Grades are necessary, though there is much more to education than just grades. For students who complete the work, more than 90 percent of the grades in English 322 will be between B- and A.

Many university teachers in the humanities, including myself, make some use of the “Socratic method,” which means that I may challenge what you say, and force you to defend and refine your position. This is not because I want to damage your self-esteem, but because I think the search for truth is “agonistic”čthat it involves conflict and the willingness to take the other person’s beliefs into account.

Feedback. When you give a class report, I will make a few comments and discussion will follow. It is not appropriate for me to discuss your grade in public; talk to me after class or in office hours and I will tell you what grade I assigned.

Term Papers. If your work may be late, you must let me know, give a reason, and estimate when it will be completed.

Papers do go missing, if rarely, and it is your responsibility to keep a reserve copy of any written work you submit.

Final Exam. This will be open book, and will give you a choice of novels and of questions.

Office Hours. I will be there at office hours and you are encouraged to come and discuss the course or anything else with me.

Letters of Recommendation. It is part of the instructor’s job to provide letters of recommendation for students who need one, and who have completed the course. I need a reasonable amount of time (2 weeks) before the deadline, and I will need a copy of your written work.

Plagiarism. See the department handout on this.