Upcoming Thesis Defences

MA THESIS DEFENCE

Monday, July 20, 2020 | 10:00am PST | Remote Attendance

Name: Amanda Champion
Title:  
“Examining the Impacts Associated with Technology-Facilitated Sexual Violence: A Mixed Methods Approach."

Abstract

Numerous cases of technology-facilitated sexual violence (TFSV) exemplify potentially tragic outcomes for victims including stress, anxiety, depression, and negative social/occupational consequences. A mixed methods approach was used to integrate survey data (N = 337) with interview data (N = 10) to gain a more in-depth understanding of TFSV victimization impacts for men and women as well as to examine the predominant feminist perspective in TFSV research. In addition, quantitative survey data (N = 521) were used to evaluate the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide (ITS) in the context of TFSV victimization. The objective was to analyze the mechanisms underlying the relationship between TFSV victimization and suicidality, exclusively accounting for mediating factors of interpersonal victimization, depression, perceived burdensomeness (PB), and thwarted belongingness (TB). Results revealed several major themes that emerged among victims of TFSV including the mistrust of others, a continued sense of a loss of control, and fear of future repercussions stemming from the victimization. Pathway results showed that TFSV victimization increased suicidality serially through bullying, depression, and PB – suggesting a cascade of victimization experiences. TB was not a significant mediator.

Senior Supervisor: Dr. Richard Frank
Supervisor: Dr. Ted Palys
External Examiner: Mr. Chris Atchison, University of British Columbia
Chair: Dr. Bryan Kinney 

All are welcome to attend.  Contact crimgrad@sfu.ca for remote detaiils.

 

MA THESIS DEFENCE

Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | 10:00am PST | Remote Attendance

Name: Karmvir Padda 
Title:  
“Foreign Interference in U.S. Politics: An Examination of 'Fake News' Content on Social Media"

Abstract

Fake news has become a powerful and disruptive force in the social media environment, with serious consequences for democracy. As a result, news organizations and tech companies have taken measures to reduce or eliminate the propagation and dissemination of fake news. The current study analyzes data gathered from Facebook and Twitter from two major events that occurred in U.S. politics: the 2016 U.S. presidential election and the 2019/2020 impeachment inquiry and trial of Donald Trump. Qualitative content analysis revealed that the majority of posts and tweets examined in this study could be classified as fake news, and that they were decidedly pro-Trump in angle. Through the lens of agenda setting theory, it was observed that the major issues covered in both time periods under study favoured Trump and his policies, while they denigrated the Democratic party and its members. Multiple themes emerged that shed new light on the tactics employed by hostile foreign actors to micro-target and influence social media users.

Senior Supervisor: Dr. Richard Frank
Supervisor: Dr. Barry Carwright
External Examiner: Dr. Maite Taboada, SFU
Chair: Dr. Bryan Kinney 

All are welcome to attend.  Contact crimgrad@sfu.ca for remote detaiils.

 

MA THESIS DEFENCE

Thursday, July 30, 2020 | 10:00am PST | Remote Attendance

Name: Kayla Barkase
Title:  
“Mandatory minimum sentences of imprisonment as 'cruel and unusual punishment': Exploring constitutional infirmity post-Nur (2015)"

Abstract

This research examines judicial intervention striking down mandatory minimum sentencing laws in Canada. Between 2006 and 2015, former Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s Conservative government introduced (and increased) an unprecedented number of mandatory minimums in the Criminal Code and Controlled Drugs and Substances Act. Approximately 100 offences now carry a minimum period of imprisonment. In 2015 and 2016, the Supreme Court of Canada struck down provisions imposing minimum periods of imprisonment in R v Nur and R v Lloyd, for violating the prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment enshrined in s. 12 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Lower courts across Canada have continued striking down other mandatory minimum provisions (primarily those pertaining to drug, sex, and weapons offences). 134 cases challenging the constitutional validity of mandatory minimums are reviewed. This research concludes the current Liberal government has not fulfilled its commitment to review the previously imposed mandatory minimum penalties, despite more effective and less costly sentencing approaches.

Senior Supervisor: David MacAlister, LL.M
Supervisor: Dr. Bryan Kinney 
External Examiner: Dr. Michelle Lawrence, LL.M, University of Victoria 
Chair: Dr. Sheri Fabian

All are welcome to attend.  Contact crimgrad@sfu.ca for remote detaiils.