Professional Development

3MT: Mara Katz

May 16, 2016
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SFU's Three Minute Thesis (3MT) finals took place on March 14, 2016. Mara Katz, Linguistics, spoke on "Politeness Theory and a New Classification of English Speech Acts." Supervisor: Nancy Hedberg.

"I’ve always been fascinated by how language works. Wordplay makes me laugh, etymology and discourse structures intrigue me, and linguistics as a whole is the most fun academic subject I can think of!"

Mara Katz comes to the Department of Linguistics at SFU from the Midwestern United States. She completed her BA in Linguistics and Chinese Language and Literature at the University of Pittsburgh, with an honours thesis on address term usage in 1970s Doctor Who.  Mara was inspired to study Linguistics by her father, who teaches English grammar and literature in Illinois; she is collaborating with her father on a paper about the history of the word “relatable.” 

Mara learned that linguistics could be fun when Lauren Collister, who taught Mara's Introduction to Linguistics course in Pittsburgh, was doing her PhD work on pragmatics in the online multiplayer game World of Warcraft and her final project required Mara to invent her own language. Being an avid gamer herself, Mara was hooked.

Mara's MA research has the potential to help many; Mara has worked with children with Asperger's Syndrome, most of whom struggle with their peers because they do not understand the social aspects of conversation. By studying pragmatics and sociolinguistics, she can help children apply the orderly, formal systems with which they are usually comfortable to the messy and awkward world of human communication, and to grasp the nuances of conversation they might otherwise miss. By studying how different types of speech acts relate to each other, and how that knowledge can be used to effectively analyze dialogue, she hopes to provide a framework to those who struggle to understand social interactions.

Mara makes fun a priority and is an active participant and organizer of a variety of online and tabletop board, card, and roleplaying games. Mara has purchased far more yarn that she could probably ever use, and may be found in her extensive yarn stash, knitting obsessively.

Publications

The UNIT ‘Dating’ Crisis: Investigating shipping choices in Doctor Who's UNIT era - Undergraduate honors thesis approved May 2014 at the University of Pittsburgh

“Politeness Theory and a New Taxonomy of Speech Acts” - Paper to be published in the Working Papers of the Linguistics Circle at the University of Victoria

Presentations

“The UNIT ‘Dating’ Crisis: Investigating shipping choices in Doctor Who's UNIT era” - Paper presented at the Popular Culture Association national conference, April 18, 2014

“Politeness Theory and a New Taxonomy of Speech Acts” - Poster presented at the Northwest Linguistics Conference, April 26, 2015 at the University of Victoria

Links

LinkedIn: Mara Katz 
Department Profile: Mara Katz
Dean of Graduate Studies Article: Mara Katz

“I’ve always been fascinated by how language works. Wordplay makes me laugh, etymology and discourse structures intrigue me, and linguistics as a whole is the most fun academic subject I can think of!”

Mara Katz comes to the Department of Linguistics at SFU from the Midwestern United States. She completed her BA in Linguistics and Chinese Language and Literature at the University of Pittsburgh, with an honours thesis on address term usage in 1970s Doctor Who.  Mara was inspired to study Linguistics by her father, who teaches English grammar and literature in Illinois; she is collaborating with her father on a paper about the history of the word “relatable.” 

Mara learned that linguistics could be fun when Lauren Collister, who taught Mara's Introduction to Linguistics course in Pittsburgh, was doing her PhD work on pragmatics in the online multiplayer game World of Warcraft and her final project required Mara to invent her own language. Being an avid gamer herself, Mara was hooked.

Mara's MA research has the potential to help many; Mara has worked with children with Asperger's Syndrome, most of whom struggle with their peers because they do not understand the social aspects of conversation. By studying pragmatics and sociolinguistics, she can help children apply the orderly, formal systems with which they are usually comfortable to the messy and awkward world of human communication, and to grasp the nuances of conversation they might otherwise miss. By studying how different types of speech acts relate to each other, and how that knowledge can be used to effectively analyze dialogue, she hopes to provide a framework to those who struggle to understand social interactions.

Mara makes fun a priority and is an active participant and organizer of a variety of online and tabletop board, card, and roleplaying games. Mara has purchased far more yarn that she could probably ever use, and may be found in her extensive yarn stash, knitting obsessively.

PUBLICATIONS

The UNIT ‘Dating’ Crisis: Investigating shipping choices in Doctor Who's UNIT era - Undergraduate honors thesis approved May 2014 at the University of Pittsburgh

“Politeness Theory and a New Taxonomy of Speech Acts” - Paper to be published in the Working Papers of the Linguistics Circle at the University of Victoria

PRESENTATIONS

“The UNIT ‘Dating’ Crisis: Investigating shipping choices in Doctor Who's UNIT era” - Paper presented at the Popular Culture Association national conference, April 18, 2014

“Politeness Theory and a New Taxonomy of Speech Acts” - Poster presented at the Northwest Linguistics Conference, April 26, 2015 at the University of Victoria

“I’ve always been fascinated by how language works. Wordplay makes me laugh, etymology and discourse structures intrigue me, and linguistics as a whole is the most fun academic subject I can think of!”

Mara Katz comes to the Department of Linguistics at SFU from the Midwestern United States. She completed her BA in Linguistics and Chinese Language and Literature at the University of Pittsburgh, with an honours thesis on address term usage in 1970s Doctor Who.  Mara was inspired to study Linguistics by her father, who teaches English grammar and literature in Illinois; she is collaborating with her father on a paper about the history of the word “relatable.” 

Mara learned that linguistics could be fun when Lauren Collister, who taught Mara's Introduction to Linguistics course in Pittsburgh, was doing her PhD work on pragmatics in the online multiplayer game World of Warcraft and her final project required Mara to invent her own language. Being an avid gamer herself, Mara was hooked.

Mara's MA research has the potential to help many; Mara has worked with children with Asperger's Syndrome, most of whom struggle with their peers because they do not understand the social aspects of conversation. By studying pragmatics and sociolinguistics, she can help children apply the orderly, formal systems with which they are usually comfortable to the messy and awkward world of human communication, and to grasp the nuances of conversation they might otherwise miss. By studying how different types of speech acts relate to each other, and how that knowledge can be used to effectively analyze dialogue, she hopes to provide a framework to those who struggle to understand social interactions.

Mara makes fun a priority and is an active participant and organizer of a variety of online and tabletop board, card, and roleplaying games. Mara has purchased far more yarn that she could probably ever use, and may be found in her extensive yarn stash, knitting obsessively.

PUBLICATIONS

The UNIT ‘Dating’ Crisis: Investigating shipping choices in Doctor Who's UNIT era - Undergraduate honors thesis approved May 2014 at the University of Pittsburgh

“Politeness Theory and a New Taxonomy of Speech Acts” - Paper to be published in the Working Papers of the Linguistics Circle at the University of Victoria

PRESENTATIONS

“The UNIT ‘Dating’ Crisis: Investigating shipping choices in Doctor Who's UNIT era” - Paper presented at the Popular Culture Association national conference, April 18, 2014

“Politeness Theory and a New Taxonomy of Speech Acts” - Poster presented at the Northwest Linguistics Conference, April 26, 2015 at the University of Victoria

One take, one static slide, no props.
Just 3 minutes and the power of the spoken word.

3MT is an unparalleled interdisciplinary opportunity for you to hear about the interesting research that's taking place around the university, as well as to pick up some presentation techniques from some of the best graduate student presenters at SFU — and all in 3-minute segments.

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