Task Force on Teacher Education for the 21st Century

Introduction

The Task Force on Teacher Education for the 21st Century (TEF21) is directed at creating a vision for teacher education in British Columbia. Appointed by Kris Magnusson, Dean of Education, to plan and coordinate the initial stages of this project are Paul Neufeld (Chair), Ann Chinnery, and Robin Brayne.

Framing the Project

It is, perhaps, short sighted to prepare teachers only for today’s schools, classrooms and established practices. We should also focus on preparing them for tomorrow’s schools and tomorrow’s classrooms. 

The challenge for planners and policy makers is to move their thinking beyond immediate issues and current realities; anticipate change and look around the corner; look beyond making current organizational frameworks more efficient; look past current priorities and “active files” for schooling; and instead to forecast what learning portals and school structures might look like in the future; predict what kinds of teachers and teaching repertoires will be required for these new school organizations and portals; and imagine and design innovative and informed practices for recruiting, selecting and preparing teachers. Planners and policy makers cannot predict the unknowable future, but can hypothesize and construct, from critical and interrelated trends, possible futures (scenarios) upon which changes can be planned. Thus, the organizing framework for TEF21 is that of constructing possible future scenarios for schooling and then describing the implications of these scenarios for teaching and learning, curriculum, the organization of schools, and, in turn, for teacher education.

Phases of TEF21

At the outset of the project our challenge was to forecast what learning portals and school structures might look like in the future; to predict what kinds of teachers and teaching repertoires will be required for such portals and schools; and to begin to think about the kinds of practices necessary for recruiting, selecting, and preparing teachers who will work in such contexts.

Reports produced as a result of our work will be uploaded as we complete them and will be downloadable below.

Phase 1 Report: The Context.

In this report we provide a context for the overall work of the task force by identifying broad educational, political, social and economic trends and associated policy frameworks and educational developments that may influence the organization, governance, infrastructure and delivery of educational programs and services to school-aged learners in British Columbia.

You can download the Phase 1 report by clicking here

Phase 2 Report: Scenario Methodology—A Framework for Reimagining
Teacher Education

This report involved making informed guesses about the implications of the trends identified in Report 1 for the future of schooling and teaching in British Columbia. The report is framed around a set of 6 possible scenarios for schooling developed by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). We adopted this approach in an effort to capture a broad range of provocative but plausible scenarios describing how schools may look down the road and in an effort to help us consider the kinds of challenges and opportunities associated with different scenarios.

You can download the Phase 2 report by clicking here

Phase 3 Report: Thought-Provoking Practices in Teacher Education

In this report we provide a review of thought-provoking practices in teacher education in the English-speaking world plus Finland. The review is neither exhaustive nor representative of all the innovative work in teacher education even given our narrowed focal arena. Practices were selected not as models but as prompts to provoke thought, discussion, and debate about what teacher education ought look like if it is to best prepare teachers for a future that is neither fully clear nor completely opaque.

You can download the Phase 3 report by clicking here