Betty Schellenberg

Professor

Education

  • BEd, BA (Winnipeg)
  • MA, PhD (Ottawa)

Biography

Betty Schellenberg's expertise is in manuscript and print cultures of the 18th century. She has worked especially on the topics of author professionalization and literary coteries, and her archival research has focused on authors' correspondence, author professionalization and literary coteries, and her archival research has focused on authors' correspondence, Bluestocking letter collections, and the records of manuscript-exchanging literary coteries.

Professor Schellenberg's current, SSHRC-funded research project is the first-ever study of manuscript verse miscellanies. These are unique, personal poetry anthologies created by “ordinary people” out of poetry copied from magazines, the writing of people in their networks, and their own compositions. What these people chose to copy, imitate, adapt, and juxtapose offers us a rare glimpse into the lively poetry scene of the eighteenth century. A spin-off from this project is an open-access database of miscellanies scattered throughout archives in the UK and North America.

Professor Schellenberg is the founding member of the Department of English's Print Culture MA specialization.

Publications

Women in Book History, 1660-1836, ed. Michelle Levy and Betty A. Schellenberg, special issue of the Huntington Library Quarterly. (forthcoming spring 2021)

Samuel Richardson in Context, ed. Peter Sabor and Betty A. Schellenberg. Cambridge UP (2017)

Literary Coteries and the Making of Modern Print Culture, 1740-1790 (2016)

Correspondence Primarily on Sir Charles Grandison (1750-54), Volume 10 of The Cambridge Edition of the Correspondence of Samuel Richardson, general editors Thomas Keymer and Peter Sabor. Cambridge UP (2015)

The Professionalization of Women Writers in Eighteenth-Century Britain (2005)

Reconsidering the Bluestockings (2003, co-edited with Nicole Pohl)

Part Two: Reflections on the Sequel (1998, co-edited with Paul Budra)

The Conversational Circle: Rereading the English Novel, 1740-1775 (1996)

Her articles on feminist literary history, British domestic travel writing, print and manuscript cultures, Bluestocking women, and the 18th-century novel have appeared in numerous journals and collections.