FASS Canada 150 Courses

How diverse and inclusive is Canada as nation and what does this mean for citizens and residents?

As Canada celebrates the 150th anniversary of confederation, students will examine these complex questions through a series of public lectures in the FASS Canada 150 Speakers’ Series and interactive tutorial sessions.

A co-curricular, practical component explores theories of “active” citizenship, citizenship “tests” and collective definitions of who “we” are to encourage reflexive engagement as citizens/residents.

Summer 2017

FASS 250-3 FASS Canada 150 Community Service Practicum

Leah Wiener, History

This course focuses on experiential education, which emphasizes learning by doing. Students will complete up to 40 hours of structured volunteer work with selected community partners in the Lower Mainland contributing to Canada 150 celebratory or commemorative projects, events or exhibitions. Together with customized assigned readings and related research, students will gain a deeper understanding of civic responsibility, volunteering, event and project planning, and how to evaluate the contributions of such civic activity to daily life in Canada. The volunteer schedule and duties will be determined in collaboration with the community partner.

FASS 350-4  Canada 150 Creative Community MashUp

Dr. Joseph Clark, Film Studies

To mark the 150th anniversary of Confederation in Canada , upper level students will self-organize and design, create and mobilize their own research-based expressive projects based on the 150th anniversary national themes (diversity, inclusiveness, young people, the environment and reconciliation with Indigenous peoples). Projects may include CJSF radio series, podcasts, special performative events or exhibitions in their local communities, offered independently or in partnership with Canada 150 Alliance members. From pitch to performance, learn the skills for effective public intervention and project management.

ENGL/FNST 226-3: 150 Years of Indigenous Literature: Once Neglected, Now Celebrated

Dr. Deanna Reder, First Nations Studies and Dr. Sophie McCall, English

Explore one of the most overlooked literary archives in English Canada. Challenge yourself to re-imagine the history of this land from a diverse range of Indigenous perspectives. Learn directly from path-breaking Indigenous writers, scholars, filmmakers, and artists about the rich legacy of Indigenous arts.

ENGL 379-4: Colonial Romanticism: Canada and the British Romantic Imagination (1780-1832)

Part of the Field School in London and the Lake District.

This course explores colonial Canada’s place, historically and imaginatively, in the literature of the British Romantic Period (1770-1830). We will read journals of explorers; tracts by Canadian abolitionists; feminist accounts of settlement; human displacement, and immigration; and legends and memoirs about the ongoing impact of colonization on Indigenous people.

FNST 383-4 Indigenous Sustainable Technologies and Ecosystems: Weave It Back Together (Canada 150)

Dr. annie ross, First Nations Studies

Indigenous craft, technologies, bioregionalisms (being in HomeLand Place), have been and remain viable avenues for intellectual discourse, eco-logical practice, involvement in a calendar round, among others, in order to create and maintain viable and sustainable community practices and securities. To live in the time of the last of every living thing, and its associated politics of hopelessness, disappointment and longing, in an Indigenous sense, may be met with community engagement, sense of personal purpose and affect, acts of reconciliation and remediation.

Fall 2017

FASS 350-4  Canada 150 Creative Community MashUp

Dr. Milan Singh, Teaching and Learning Centre

To mark the 150th anniversary of Confederation in Canada , upper level students will self-organize and design, create and mobilize their own research-based expressive projects based on the 150th anniversary national themes (diversity, inclusiveness, young people, the environment and reconciliation with Indigenous peoples). Projects may include CJSF radio series, podcasts, special performative events or exhibitions in their local communities, offered independently or in partnership with Canada 150 Alliance members. From pitch to performance, learn the skills for effective public intervention and project management.

WL106-3 Translation Nation: the Languages of Canada

Dr. Melek Ortabasi, World Literature

This course captures the vibrancy of languages in Canada’s past and present to show how they have shaped the nation’s social and cultural imagination – and reality.  

POL 121-3 Political Engagement

Dr. Clare McGovern, Political Science

This course is on human rights in Canada, and explores ways to safeguard individual and group rights under the Charter and ways to safeguard rights for themselves and vulnerable groups, whether through activism, education, communication or legal action.

HIST 331/Pol 328-4 Speaking Canadian: 150 years of Linguistic Diversity and Language Politics

Dr. Rémi Léger, Political Science and Dr. Nicolas Kenny, History

Students will engage with First Nations, Francophone and Asian linguistic communities.

GSWS 312-4 Immigrants, Women and Transnational Migration

Dr. Habiba Zaman, Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies

This course will host three lectures: on intersections of race, class, gender, sexuality, age and different forms of ability; on Terrorist Acts and Second Generation Immigrants: the Story of Two Bangladeshi Immigrants”; and a Student Mini Conference.

CRIM 315-4 Restorative Justice: An integrated justice paradigm for the 21st Century  

Dr. Brenda Morrison, Criminology

This course is an introduction to the restorative/transformative justice paradigm.  Restorative justice is on the rise federally, provincially and in communities as we acknowledge, reflect on, and celebrate Canada 150. We will: participate in the Walk for Reconciliation on September 24; in recognition of Orange Shirt Day, we will host a showing of "We Were Children" the week of September 30; participate in a reconciliation dialogue.

CRIM 442-3 Restorative Justice Praxis: Deepening the practice of restorative justice in the 21st Century

Dr. Brenda Morrison, Criminology

This is a course on praxis: the marriage of theory and practice in the development and implementation of restorative (transformative) justice models.  In recognition of Canada 150, we will deeply consider the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's calls to action. We will: participate in the Walk for Reconciliation on September 24; in recognition of Orange Shirt Day, we will host a showing of "We Were Children" the week of Sept 30; participate in a reconciliation dialogue.