Maite Taboada

Associate Dean, Research & International (Acting)

Maite Taboada

Associate Dean, Research & International (Acting)

Areas of interest

The Associate Dean, Research and International, oversees Faculty research matters including approvals for proposals (e.g., signatures) and advises on and interprets research policies for FASS faculty members.

As Associate Dean, Research and International, I am responsible for all research-related activities within FASS, including supporting continuing faculty members’ research initiatives; coordinating visiting scholar/fellow appointments; providing leadership in profiling FASS research activities; leveraging opportunities for recognition of FASS research; and liaising with the Office of the Vice President, Research & International (VPRI) to identify and promote FASS faculty members in relation to institutional nominations for SFU, national, and international awards. My portfolio also encompasses institutional international activities, liaising with SFU’s senior administration concerning FASS and SFU international initiatives. I chair the FASS Farley Distinguished Visiting Scholar Search Committee, FASS Jack and Doris Shadbolt for the Humanities Steering Committee, and FASS ad-hoc Research Committee, and serve on the Scholars at Risk Committee, SFU Research Computing Stewardship Committee, and Associate Vice President, Research (AVPR)-Associate Dean, Research consultation committee.

I am a professor in SFU's Department of Linguistics and an associate member of SFU's Cognitive Science Program and SFU's School of Computing Science. I am a linguist working at the intersection of discourse analysis and computational linguistics. In discourse analysis, I study the mechanisms for coherence in discourse, focusing on how links across sentences produce the impression of coherence in text and speech. In computational linguistics, I develop methods and algorithms to process and exploit discourse structure in different applications, especially for sentiment analysis. Current research projects involve analyses of online comments, with the goal of building a moderation platform to feature constructive comments more prominently, and a study of the language of misinformation, using text classification techniques to distinguish ‘fake’ and fact-based news stories. My lab is also collaborating with the non-profit Informed Opinions. Together, we have built the Gender Gap Tracker, an online tool to track the number of men and women quoted in Canadian mainstream news media.