Criminology

Develop a critical and focused mind through the interdisciplinary study of crime as both an individual and social phenomenon. Study research on the origins and forms of crime, its consequences, and social and governmental reactions to crime. Take an integrative approach to questions of individual and societal behaviour and acquire an in-depth understanding of the complexities of criminal, delinquent and deviant behaviour.

About criminology

Criminology covers range of complex issues including psychological and sociological causes of deviance, terrorism, forensics, environmental crime, and restorative justice. In addition to the criminology major and minor, the Department of Criminology also offers a variety of certificate programs.

An interdisciplinary field, criminology courses are integrated with a multitude of fields including psychology, political science, economics, computing science, and mathematics.

Criminology courses are offered at all three SFU campuses in Burnaby, Surrey, and Vancouver. Students of criminology may also participate in international field schools and exchange programs, as well as gain work experience in co-op placements.

Career pathways

The interdisciplinary nature of criminology programs enable students to pursue their interests in areas such as crime prevention, corrections, law enforcement, law and law reform, and research policy and analysis. Criminology alumni have gone on to pursue careers in the following areas.

  • Law enforcement, policing, corrections
  • Community or regional planning
  • Victim, witness, youth and family
  • Advocacy
  • Consulting firms
  • Criminal, forensic and private investigations
  • Public administration, risk management
  • International development agencies
  • Education and academia
  • Government policy analyst or researcher
  • Foreign service worker
  • Immigration officer

Learn more

In this presentation, Vienna will share highlights of her research on aquatic body decomposition and discuss the applications of entomological research in medicolegal investigations. This talk will include brief stories about past field work and how the audience can re-envision what it means to be a student through SFU's many academic exchange opportunities.

Learn more at our e-Library.

The social nature of crime is one of the most well documented features of criminal behavior. Crime is often learned through interactions with peers and many criminal acts are committed with other offenders. This lecture introduces the theoretical perspectives used to help understand the learning processes involved in crime and explore the powerful role of groups and deviant peers.

Learn more at our e-Library.

University is different from highschool. In this Q&A, incoming students and their parents/supporters can ask questions about the remote learning and understand better by talking with two Criminology professors how they can succeed in their first year in university.

Learn more at our e-Library.

University is different from highschool. In this Q&A, incoming students and their parents/supporters can ask questions about the remote learning and understand better by talking with two Criminology professors how they can succeed in their first year in university.

Learn more at our e-Library.

Dr. Brenda Morrison describes CRIM 315: Restorative Justice.

Dr. Gail Anderson uses her expertise as a forensic entomologist to help exonerate an innocent woman