Greg Thomas-Reilly

Managing Partner, Infectious Strategies Consulting

Greg Thomas-Reilly

Managing Partner, Infectious Strategies Consulting

Areas of interest

Communicable Disease Control, Health Systems, Vulnerable Populations

Biography

Greg Thomas-Reilly, PhD, is the Managing Partner of Infectious Strategies Consulting, a private sector firm specializing in communicable disease prevention and control. Greg’s academic appointments include serving as an Adjunct Professor in the Faculty of Health Sciences at Simon Fraser University, and as an Adjunct Professor to the School of Nursing at the University of British Columbia. Formerly, Greg was a Lecturer in Communicable Disease Control & Health Systems at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

Greg has almost 20 years of experience in communicable disease control, including work on the frontline and leading on some major outbreaks (e.g. SARS in Toronto, Ebola in West Africa, and COVID-19 in Vancouver). Greg was formerly the Senior Advisor on Emerging & Zoonotic Infectious Diseases at the Public Health Agency of Canada, where he led the development of an early warning system for infectious disease threats. Greg has represented Canada internationally to major international organizations, and has worked abroad in Africa, Eastern Europe, and Southeast Asia.

Greg has 4 degrees and a post-graduate diploma: 1) a bachelor of arts in bioethics & political science (Toronto); 2) a bachelor of science in nursing (McMaster); 3) a master of science in population & public health (SFU); 4) a doctorate (PhD) in public health (London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine); and 5) a post-graduate diploma in public health & policy (London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine). He also holds practicing registration with the College of Registered Nurses of BC.

Current focus of research and / or main interest(s): Communicable disease prevention & control in vulnerable, marginalized and at-risk populations. The etiology and early identification of emerging infectious diseases with pandemic potential.