Children's Health Policy Centre to Lead Scientific Evaluation of nurse-Family Partnership in the Faculty of Health Sciences

June 07, 2011
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As announced today (June 7, 2011) by British Columbia’s Minister of Health, Michael de Jong, BC will become the first province in Canada to implement and evaluate the $23 million landmark Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) program that will rolled out through all the Health Authorities in BC.

As announced today by British Columbia’s Minister of Health, Michael de Jong, BC will become the first province in Canada to implement and evaluate the landmark Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) program.  Dr. Charlotte Waddell will lead the scientific evaluation of NFP at the Children's Health Policy Centre, together with Dr. Harriet MacMillan from the Offord Centre for Child Studies at McMaster University, and in collaboration with the BC Ministry of Health, the BC Ministry of Children and Family Development and BC’s Health Authorities.

NFP involves public health nurses providing intensive education and support to vulnerable first-time mothers in their homes, beginning prenatally and continuing until children are two years old.  This 30-year-old public health program has been found to have lasting benefits in diverse US settings — preventing child maltreatment, reducing child antisocial behaviour, and improving developmental outcomes for both children and mothers over the longterm.  NFP was developed by Dr. David Olds, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado.  The Children’s Health Policy Centre was pleased to bring Dr. Olds to Vancouver for a public dialogue in January 2011, as the inaugural event in our annual Mowafaghian Children's Health Policy Visiting Scholar Program.  A complete recording of the event is available on the website at http://www.childhealthpolicy.sfu.ca.

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