"Encompassing several independent research projects, Steve’s thesis establishes a multifaceted extension of the basic framework that has been the workhorse of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics for the past 20 years, to systems that are strongly fluctuating and autonomous, thereby facilitating the application of stochastic thermodynamics ideas to understand molecular machines in nanotechnology and in living things. "

Dr. David Sivak

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Dr. Steven Large receives Dean’s Convocation Medal

As one of SFU's most outstanding graduate students from the Faculty of Science, Dr. Steven Large is recognized with the Dean of Graduate Studies Convocation Medal. On behalf of SFU, we congratulate Dr. Large on his outstanding achievements.

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July 19, 2021

Dr. Steven Large’s doctoral thesis, Dissipation and control in microscopic nonequilibrium systems, studied the physics of biological systems at the nanoscale to develop a better understanding of efficient nanoscale machines.

“Encompassing several independent research projects, Steve’s thesis establishes a multifaceted extension of the basic framework that has been the workhorse of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics for the past 20 years, to systems that are strongly fluctuating and autonomous, thereby facilitating the application of stochastic thermodynamics ideas to understand molecular machines in nanotechnology and in living things,” says his supervisor, Dr. David Sivak.

He achieved a 4.23 CGPA through his graduate schooling, published 5 first-author research articles, and received a number of awards, both within and outside of SFU.

Steve was remarkably successful in securing independent funding throughout his graduate career. He won a 1-year NSERC CGS-M and 3-year CGS-D graduate scholarships to fund the vast majority of his time in graduate school, and the two highest (and most lucrative) awards SFU Physics bestows (on one student each year), the Billy Jones Graduate Award and Howards Malm Graduate Scholarship.

“He is easily the most impressive (and certainly most decorated) graduate student I have known in my 6.5 years at SFU,” notes Sivak.

Says Large, “I am incredibly grateful to receive this award, and it serves as a welcome conclusion to an amazing period in my life. Throughout the years, I have had the opportunity to work with a group of amazing researchers and scientists from across the globe and am thankful for having had the chance to collaborate with them on interesting ideas. Above all else, I want to thank my supervisor, whose limitless dedication to his students and research encouraged me to pursue those interesting ideas and develop into the scientist that I am today.”

Since defending his thesis, Steven has taken his expertise to the private sector, where he is working as a data scientist with Viewpoint Investment Partners, in Calgary Alberta.