Dr. Cojocaru’s thesis, “captures some profound work that constrains our understanding of the earliest periods of evolution.”

Peter Unrau 

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Dr. Razvan Cojocaru receives the Governor General’s Gold Medal

As one of SFU's most outstanding graduate students from the Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Dr. Razvan Cojocaru is recognized with the Governor General’s Gold Medal. On behalf of SFU, we congratulate Dr. Cojocaru on his outstanding achievements.

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By Sarah Close-Humayun
June 01, 2022

Dr. Cojocaru’s doctoral thesis, “In vitro evolution of a processive clamping RNA polymerase ribozyme with promoter recognition” examines the early evolution of life on Earth through RNA research. Additional to his Origin of Life work, Dr. Cojocaru helped develop a powerful RNA imaging and purification technology, collaborated on research in characterizing human RNA linked to Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma cancer and validated a microchip COVID-19 detection technology.

Dr. Cojocaru’s contribution extends well beyond his written thesis. Along with many academic achievements, Dr. Cojocaru has won the Dr. Bruce Brandhorst’s Prize for best publication, best MBB PhD Thesis and Innovate BC Commercialization Scholarship. Outside science, Dr. Cojocaru is also an enthusiastic dodgeball player.

Supervisor Dr. Peter Unrau of SFU’s Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry said that Dr. Cojocaru’s thesis, “captures some profound work that constrains our understanding of the earliest periods of evolution.”

Says Dr. Cojocaru, “Working with Dr. Unrau was an incredible learning experience that helped me develop into the scientist I am today. It’s an honor for our work to be recognized through the Dean’s Convocation Medal.”

Dr. Cojocaru is now a research scientist at Acuitas Therapeutics, where he develops new analytical methods to study mRNA vaccines to increase understanding of their functionality and clinical potential.