Associates

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Associates will serve for a two-year, renewable term, and are eligible to attend the Annual General Meeting of the Institute and will take the lead on proposing projects to be undertaken by the Institute. Associates shall commit themselves, where possible, to attend and support Institute events to help build, deepen and extend the Institute's networks.

Patricia Barkaskas earned a M.A. in History, with a focus on Indigenous histories in North America, and a J.D., with a Law and Social Justice Specialization, from the University of British Columbia. She is the Academic Director of the Indigenous Community Legal Clinic and an Instructor at the Peter A. Allard School of Law. Patricia has practiced in the areas of child protection (as parent’s counsel), civil, criminal, family, and prison law. She has worked closely with Indigenous peoples in their encounters with the justice system and worked for Residential school survivors as an historical legal researcher for the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. In addition, she has written Gladue reports for all levels of court in BC. Her current and future teaching and research interests include access to justice, clinical legal education, decolonizing and Indigenizing law - particularly examining the value of Indigenous pedagogies in experiential and clinical learning for legal education - and Indigenous laws. Patricia is Métis from Alberta.

Bruce Baugh is Professor of World Literature at Thompson Rivers University (Kamloops), where he is Principal Investigator of the Walking Lab, an interdisciplinary research group on walking. He is the author of French Hegel: From Surrealism to Postmodernism (Routledge, 2003) and numerous articles on Deleuze, Sartre, Derrida, Heidegger, Spinoza and others in journals such as the Journal of Value InquiryContinental Philosophy ReviewDialogue, the Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, and the Journal for the Society for Phenomenology. His translation of Benjamin Fondane’s philosophical essays, Existential Monday: Benjamin Fondane’s Philosophical Essays will be published by NYRB Books in 2015. In addition to serving as Executive Editor of Sartre Studies International since 2005, he is a long-time member of the Editorial Board of Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy and has served as s referee for numerous journals (DialogueJournal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism;  Revue philosophique de Louvain, etc.) His current project, Philosopher’s Walk: Philosophy and Walking, will be completed this year, and contains essays on walking and the philosophies of Descartes, Gassendi, Sartre, Heidegger, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard and Rousseau.

Lindsay Brown is a Vancouver writer, designer and activist. She is author of  “Habitat ’76," an illustrated history of Vancouver's 1976 UN Habitat Conference on Human Settlements, the world's first global conference on cities and housing (Black Dog Publishing, 2017). Brown is Director of Communications for Commons BC, which creates and collects data visualization of BC’s public resources, and was co-founder of the Vancouver Not Vegas Coalition which defeated gambling expansion in Vancouver. She co-founded Ouno Design, an ongoing design criticism and research project. She has an MA in Communication from Simon Fraser University, and was on the Leaders Council of the Indian Summer Festival.

Andrew Bruce is a SAR Ph.D. Student in the Department of Humanities. His Ph.D. research is focused on Joseph Beuys.

Howard Caygill is Professor of Modern European Philosophy at the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy at Kingston University, London, and a Visiting Professor in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Paris VIII.  He was previously Professor of Cultural History at Goldsmiths College, University of London.  He is the author of Art of JudgementA Kant Dictionary, and Walter Benjamin: The Colour of Experience and Levinas and the Political. His most recent book On Resistance is the first volume of a trilogy on the philosophy of defiance, the second part Kafka: In the Light of the Accident will be published in 2015 and the third The Aesthetics of Madness in 2016.

Glen Coulthard is Weledeh Dene and an assistant professor in the First Nations and Indigenous Studies Program and the Department of Political Science at the University of British Columbia. His book Red Skin, White Masks (University of Minnesota Press, 2014) was awarded the Caribbean Philosophical Association's Frantz Fanon Award for Most Outstanding Book, 2016.  He teaches political theory and Indigenous politics.

Selina Crammond is currently a film programmer at DOXA Documentary Film Festival.  She is one of the founders and organizers of Shout Back! Festival, an all-ages, feminist and queer music festival.  She is also involved with a variety of other arts and non-profit organizations including Vancouver International Film Festival, Girls Rock Camp Vancouver, Safe Amplification Site Society and COPE Coalition of Progressive Electors. Selina has a BA in Communication and Fine & Performing Arts from SFU.

Zoë Druick is Professor in the School of Communication at Simon Fraser University. Her research considers histories, theories and trajectories of documentary and reality-based media. Books include the monographs Projecting Canada: Government Policy and Documentary Film at the National Film Board of Canada (McGill-Queen's University Press, 2007) and Allan King's A Married Couple (University of Toronto Press, 2010); and the edited collections Programming Reality (Wilfrid Laurier Press, 2008), The Grierson Effect (British Film Institute, 2014), and Cinephemera: Archives, Ephemeral Cinema and New Screen Histories in Canada (McGill-Queen's University Press, 2014). She is currently co-director of the Centre for Policy Studies of Cultures and Communities (SFU) and Associate Dean of the Faculty of Communication, Art and Technology (SFU).

Hossein Fazeli has been writing and directing dramatic and non-fiction films for the past 15 years. His films have been broadcast around the world, including on BBC, ARTE, SBS, and Canal+. His film, The Tale of The Two Nazanins, about an Iranian teenage girl imprisoned on death row, was broadcast on CNN and BBC and is credited with igniting an international campaign that saved her life. His most recently completed documentary, Women on The Frontline, is about Iranian women’s rights activists.  In 2007, he was short-listed by the Sundance Institute to take part in their International Filmmakers Award. His films have won 37 international awards. www.fazelifilms.com

Andrew Feenberg is Canada Research Chair in Philosophy of Technology in the School of Communication, Simon Fraser University, where he directs the Applied Communication and Technology Lab. He has also taught for many years in the Philosophy Department at San Diego State University, and at Duke University, the State University of New York at Buffalo, the Universities of California, San Diego and Irvine, the Sorbonne, the University of Paris-Dauphine, the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, and the University of Tokyo and the University of Brasilia. Dr. Feenberg is Directeur de Programme at the College Internationale de Philosophie for the period 2013-1019.

Hilda Fernandez received an MA on Clinical Psychology from the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) an MA in Spanish Literature from the University of British Columbia (UBC) and she has more than 20 years of Lacanian training. She practices psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic therapy in Vancouver, Canada, registered with the BC Association of Clinical Counsellors. She co-founded the Lacan Salon in 2007 and currently serves as its president. She is engaged in a PhD Program in the Department of Geography at Simon Fraser University (SFU), where she is conducting research on discursive spaces of trauma and the provision of services. She leads a Clinical Seminar in Vancouver since the fall 2015 and has published a number of articles on psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. She is passionate about the transmission of psychoanalysis and community building.

Duane Fontaine, MA, CPA, CGA is a professional accountant, and is currently a PhD student in SFU’s interdisciplinary SAR GLS program. Duane is studying the nature of work in contemporary neoliberal society and contrasting it to alternative visions for the future of work. Various policy options (e.g. job sharing, reduced work week, various basic income schemes) will be examined under the normative lenses of both Critical Theory and Virtue Ethics to determine which options hold promise in helping to bring about a more rational and life-enhancing approach to work. 

Christopher (Kit) Fortune is an internationally known historian of psychoanalysis who focuses on the work of Sandor Ferenczi. He has lectured widely and published papers, reviews and interviews in scholarly journals, as well as popular journals, including Psychology Today, The Village Voice, Globe and Mail, and Macleans. He is editor of the Sandor Ferenczi-Georg Groddeck Correspondence: 1921-1933 (Open Gate Press).  He has also published ground-breaking chapters on Ferenczi’s radical case of “RN” (Elizabeth Severn) in The Legacy of Sandor Ferenczi (Vol 1&2), Ferenczi’s Turn in Psychoanalysis, as well as 100 Years of Psychoanalysis.  He has a doctorate from the University of Toronto (0.I.S.E.), and is a former moderator of SFU's Philosophers’ Cafes. Kit has collaborated on a number of earlier Institute programmes, including: A Public Interview with Franco Borgogno (2007) (published as The Vancouver Interview), Psychoanalysis and the Politics of Fear (2011), Psychoanalysis and Social Theory (2013), Psychoanalyzing Authoritarianism (2015), and Psychoanalysis Behind Iron Curtains (2015). He is presently chairing a committee that is planning a lecture series on the theme of Psychoanalysis, History and the Politics of Trauma, due to start in the fall of 2016. fortune@vcn.bc.ca

Roger Frie, Ph.D. Psy.D. R.Psych., is Professor of Education, Simon Fraser University, Affiliate Professor of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, and Faculty Member and Supervisor at the William Alanson White Institute of Psychiatry, Psychoanalysis, and Psychology in New York and the Institute of Contemporary Psychoanalysis in Los Angeles. He has written and lectured widely on the intersection of psychoanalysis, philosophy and social theory and taught at a number of universities including Columbia University, New School University and Harvard University. He is Co-Editor of the International Journal of Psychoanalytic Self Psychology, Associate Editor of Contemporary Psychoanalysis and Editorial Board Member of Psychoanalytic Psychology. He has published six books and is currently completing a new book entitled: Limits of Understanding: Psychological Experience, German Memory and the Holocaust (Oxford: Oxford University Press).

Ajay Gudavarthy is an Associate Professor at the Centre for Political Studies, JNU, and his areas of interest include political theory, contemporary political movements, civil society and democracy, and post-colonial theory. Prior to teaching at JNU, he also taught at the National Law School, Bangalore, from 2003 to 2006. His most recent book: Cultural Politics in Modern India, was published by Aakar Delhi in 2015, the same year he was a Visiting Fellow at the Centre for Modern South Asian Studies, Tubingen University, Germany. He is currently working on Democracy and Revolutionary Violence, which will be published by Sage, and writes regularly for various News Dailies including The Hindu, Indian Express, Himal South Asian, and Deccan Herald, and is a regular commentor on National Television.

Robert A. Hackett is professor of communication, Simon Fraser University.  He has written extensively on media democratization, and journalism as political communication.  His most recent collaborative books include Expanding Peace Journalism: Comparative and Critical Approaches (2011), and Remaking Media: The Struggle to Democratize Public Communication (2006).  He is on the editorial advisory board of Journalism Studies, Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, Journal of Alternative and Community Media, and other academic journals.  He has co-founded several community-oriented media education and advocacy initiatives, including NewsWatch Canada, OpenMedia.ca, and Media Democracy Days.

Johan Frederik Hartle, Dr. phil., is Assistant Professor for Philosophy of Art and Culture at the department of Philosophy, University of Amsterdam (UvA) and adjunct professor for Philosophy and Art Theory at the School of Intermedia Art (SIMA) at the China Academy of Art (CAA) in Hangzhou, China. After finishing his dissertation at the University of Münster in 2005, he has been visiting research scholar at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, and the Università Roma Tre, Rome. His general field of research is legacy of Marxism in contemporary aesthetic and cultural theories and institutional theories of art. His book publications include: Der geöffnete Raum. Zur Politik der ästhetischen Form, Munich: Fink 2006, Beate Geissler & Oliver Sann/Johan Frederik Hartle: Personal Kill, 2010; Rainer Ganahl/Johan Frederik Hartle (eds.): DADALENIN, 2013; Johan Frederik Hartle/Thijs Lijster (eds.): De Kunst van kritiek. Adorno in context, 2015; Samir Gandesha/Johan Frederik Hartle (eds.): Reification and Spectacle. The Timeliness of Western Marxism, 2016 (forthcoming). He is currently finishing a book on the visual culture of Red Vienna (Die Sichtbarkeit des Proletariats) and editing a book on Marx and the Aesthetic (in collaboration with Samir Gandesha).

Suzanne Hawkins is a Ph.D. candidate in political science at York University and a Sasakawa Young Leaders Fellow. Her research examines processes of neoliberalization, uneven development, and the spatial dynamics of poverty governance in Canada. In addition, she is a freelance editor and online content curator. She is Assistant Editor of Contours.

Matt Hern lives and works in East Vancouver, Coast Salish Territories, with his partner and daughters. He is a community organizer who has co-founded and directed the Purple Thistle Centre, Car-Free Vancouver Day,  Groundswell: Grassroots Economic Alternatives, 2+10 Industries among many other projects. He currently teaches with multiple universities, and continues to lecture globally.  His books and articles have been published on all six continents and translated into twelve languages. His most recent book is What a City is For: Remaking the Politics of Displacement (MIT Press, 2016)

Kay Higgins is an artist and cultural worker based in Vancouver. She was a co-founder of Artspeak Gallery and the Pacific Association of Artist Run Centres, is co-proprietor (with Kathy Slade) of the artist press Publication Studio Vancouver and Executive Director of the artist-run space UNIT/PITT Projects. Her work has included manufactured publications, handmade artist books, public inscription, photography, and internet-based projects. In the past she has been a curator, editor, factory and warehouse labourer, technology  consultant, and candidate for municipal office.

Brad Hornick is a Ph.D. candidate in the Sociology department at Simon Fraser University. He has an MA in Latin American Studies at SFU and a BA Honours in Political Science from Queens University. His special area of interest presently is in climate science and the climate justice movement. He is presently a website editor for the Vancouver Ecosocialists and the System Change not Climate Change network. He has travelled and volunteered extensively throughout Latin America. He has worked professionally as a communications consultant, working with many civil society organizations. He has written for many political journals, some of his writing can be seen on a regular blog on rabble.ca.

Am Johal is Director of SFU's Vancity Office of Community Engagement. He has an MA from the Institute for Social and European Studies from Corvinus University in Hungary and completed a doctoral dissertation with European Graduate School in media philosophy. He published his first book, 'Ecological Metapolitics: Badiou and the Anthropocene' in 2015. He sits on the Vancouver City Planning Commission, the Steering Committee for SFU's Centre for Dialogue and is a board member with the Vancity Community Foundation. He has previously served as an advisor to two provincial cabinet ministers and is the co-founder of UBC's Humanities 101 program.

Joe Keithley is best known as the leader and founder of punk rock pioneers D.O.A., who have been influential around the world because of their music and their political stance. Joe has been an activist and organizer for many just causes over the years, working for a wide range of issues such as: the environment, women’s right’s, anti-racism, globalization to name a few.

Tara Mahoney is a PhD student at the SFU School of Communication and creative director of creative civic engagement agency Gen Why Media, which specializes in producing media and events around socio-political issues. Her PhD research centres on how cultural production can influence policy decisions within governmental, non-governmental and community organizations. 

Kathy Mezei is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Humanities and still continues her research in translation studies, domestic space, Canadian literature, and British women writers. Her latest book is The Domestic Space Reader (Uof T Press, 2012), edited with Chiara Briganti.

Daniel Musekamp holds a BA in Humanities from Simon Fraser University and an MA in English from the University of Victoria. He works currently in web development, a role which exposes him relentlessly to the inner workings of the the spectacle of everyday life.

Chris O’Kane recently completed his Ph.D. in Social and Political Thought at the University of Sussex. He specializes in social and political philosophy and continental philosophy, with a particular focus on Marx, Marxisms and Critical Theory. He has taught at the University of Sussex and the University of the Arts London and his work has appeared in Diskurs, Studies in Social and Political Thought and Marx and Philosophy Review of Books. He is currently writing a book on social constitution and social domination in Marx, Hegelian-Marxism and the New German Reading of Marx as well as several articles that develop points from his Ph.D. thesis. He is also editing the selected writings of Alfred Sohn-Rethel and working on a translation of Ingo Elbe’s Marx im Westen. His other research interests include humanism, anti-humanism and negative humanism and critical theories of crisis.

Irwin Oostindie is a Dutch/Canadian media artist, curator, and researcher who has led international and local media and culture projects for three decades. He has operated a dozen cultural space projects and produced two thousand events and forty festivals which focus on social justice, crosscultural dialogue, and creative technology. Irwin cocreated Canada's largest annual political arts festival, Under the Volcano, which ran 1990-2010. Irwin has worked in both the grassroots and with settler and First Nation governments, plus international networks and organisations, such as the United Nations University for Peace. He is a podcast/FM radio producer and radio host with @W2Media and Democracy North. Irwin has a Post-Graduate Certificate in Media Arts from Capilano University, and is currently a SFU School of Communications graduate student  researching cultural policy and redress, and male violence against women.

Shayna Plaut is interested in how people represent themselves in their own media, with a particular interest in peoples who do not fit neatly within the traditional notions of the nation-state. Shayna has researched and engaged with Romani media, migrant media and Indigenous media in Canada, the US and Europe for nearly 15 years. As a Fulbright and Vanier scholar, she has lived and worked in Hungary and the Balkans. Since 2004, Shayna has developed and taught a large array of courses focused on the framing of social justice and human rights including at Simon Fraser University where she served as the Simons Research Fellow from 2015–2016. Shayna has also taught at Columbia College in Chicago and was a visiting scholar at Columbia University. She is currently teaching courses on migration as well as social inequalities at the University of British Columbia and is the co-investigator for a CMRC-funded research project critically examining the use of “fixers” in international journalism. She is writing a book on how migrants are challenging and changing immigration policy through discourse in Europe. As an educator, researcher and journalist, Shayna has served as a consultant for the UN’s Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, Amnesty International and a variety of migrant and human rights organizations. Since 2014, Shayna has served as the Research Manager for Strangers at Home, a project of the Global Reporting Centre.

Kavita Reddy is a graduate student in the Department of Humanities at Simon Fraser University. Her graduate work focuses on Marxism and Critical Theory. Her primary interest is in studying the theoretical traditions of Marxist philosophy, ecological thought, and the theoretical assumptions of development discourse. She is interested in examining the environmental limits and subsequent implications to the boundless expansion of capital. She plans to examine these limits with specific reference to the contemporary extractive projects within Canada.

Deanna Reder (Cree-Metis) is Associate Professor in the Departments of First Nations Studies and English at Simon Fraser University, where she teaches courses in Indigenous popular fiction, Indigenous perspectives on gender and sexuality, and Canadian Indigenous literatures, especially autobiography. For the 2016-2018 term she is the MATE Director based at SFU Surrey. She is Principal Investigator, in partnership with co-applicants Dr. Margery Fee and Cherokee scholar Dr. Daniel Heath Justice of the University of British Columbia, on a five-year Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) funded project for 2015-2020 called "The People and the Text: Indigenous Writing in Northern North America up to 1992." See www.thepeopleandthetext.ca. She has recently co-edited an anthology of literary criticism with Dr. Linda Morra (Bishops University) called Learn, Teach, Challenge: Approaching Indigenous Literatures (Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2016). She is also working with Dr. Sophie McCall (SFU), Dr. David Gaertner and Gabrielle Hill on an anthology suitable for the first year university classroom entitled Read, Listen, Tell: Indigenous Stories from Turtle Island. She is incoming president of the newly formed Indigenous Literary Studies Association (ILSA) and is the Series Editor for the Indigenous Studies Series at Wilfrid Laurier University Press. See deannareder.com for more information.

Michal Rozworski is an independent researcher and journalist based in Vancouver, BC. He holds a Master’s degree in Economics from the University of Toronto and has conducted further graduate work in the philosophy and methodology of economics at McGill (Master’s awaiting to be awarded). He currently writes for a variety of online and print publications (bylines include Ricochet, Toronto Star, The Tyee, Jacobin), hosts a bi-weekly popular economics radio show and does economic research, primarily for trade unions.

Ken Seigneurie is Professor in the SFU Program in World Literature. He studies the relationships between literary culture and humanist thought in world literature with special emphasis on the Arab world. His most recent book is a translation from the Arabic of ‘Awdat al-almānī ila rushdih by Rashid al-Daif, published in: What Makes a Man? Sex Talk in Beirut and Berlin (University of Texas Press, 2015). His previous publications include: Standing by the Ruins: Elegiac Humanism in Wartime and Postwar Lebanon (Fordham University Press, 2011) and Crisis and Memory: The Representation of Space in Modern Levantine Narrative(Reichert, 2003). He is currently working as General Editor of the upcoming Wiley-Blackwell Companion to World Literature. Prior to coming to SFU, he lived and worked in Lebanon for thirteen years. He began his career in the 1980s as a Paris-based journalist specializing in human rights in Eastern Europe and the Middle East.

I am sχɬemtəna:t / Audrey Siegl. My mother's family is from Musqueam.  My father's family has Bavarian, Austrian, German, British, French, Jewish & East Indian roots.  My job is to speak for those who can not speak for themselves and to represent for my ancestors...to carry on their work. I am proud to use my language, songs and truth to open hearts and minds so we can all re-connect and create better days for all. nə́c̓amət ct. We are one.

I am sχɬemtəna:t / Audrey Siegl. My mother's family is from Musqueam.  My father's family has Bavarian, Austrian, German, British, French, Jewish & East Indian roots.  My job is to speak for those who can not speak for themselves and to represent for my ancestors...to carry on their work. I am proud to use my language, songs and truth to open hearts and minds so we can all re-connect and create better days for all.
nə́c̓amət ct
We are one

Ken Seigneurie is Professor and Director of the Program in World Literature. He studies the relationships between literary culture and humanist thought in world literature with special emphasis on the Arab world. His most recent book is a translation from the Arabic of ‘Awdat al-almānī ila rushdih by Rashid al-Daif, published in: What Makes a Man? Sex Talk in Beirut and Berlin (University of Texas Press, 2015). His previous publications include: Standing by the Ruins: Elegiac Humanism in Wartime and Postwar Lebanon (Fordham University Press, 2011) and Crisis and Memory: The Representation of Space in Modern Levantine Narrative(Reichert, 2003). He is currently working as General Editor of the upcoming Wiley-Blackwell Companion to World Literature. Prior to coming to SFU, he lived and worked in Lebanon for thirteen years. He began his career in the 1980s as a Paris-based journalist specializing in human rights in Eastern Europe and the Middle East.

Karl Siegler joined Talonbooks in 1974 as its business manager; began to assume his editorial duties at the company in 1979; and was its publisher from 1984 to 2011. He has contributed substantially to the development of literature, the arts and culture in Canada, not only at Talonbooks, but also as the co-founder of the Association of Book Publishers of BC [ABPBC] in 1974; the Literary Press Group [LPG] in 1975; and the Simon Fraser University Centre for Studies in Publishing in 1987. President of both the ABPBC and the LPG numerous times since their founding, he has also served as President of the Association of Canadian Publishers [ACP] three times: in 1984-85; 1992-93; and 1993-94. In addition to his work on countless committees related to book publishing in Canada over the years, he also authored the Cultural Industries Policy of the Province of Manitoba in 1983; and served as a board member of the Canadian Conference of the Arts for two terms, from 2001 to 2008, where he was Vice President and Chairman of its Policy and Advocacy Committee during his second term.

Jeremy Isao Speier is a Japanese-Canadian Vancouver-based interdisciplinary artist who graduated from Emily Carr College of Art & Design in 1992. He works in film/video, kinetic sculpture and sound, and installation. He has exhibited extensively across Canada in numerous solo and group exhibitions, and recently in 2011 at Blim Arts Society and Powell Street Festival, in 2012 at the Firehall Arts Centre, and in 2013 at Nikkei National Museum & Cultural Centre with an exhibition catalogue, Double Zero: The Point Between Future Past, (2013). Speier is currently editor for an artist book project and art publication, Little Tokyo Collaborative Essay Series, which has evolved and departed from his 2012 exhibition. www.jeremyisaospeier.com

Michael Thoma is a screenwriter, story editor, author and educator. He teaches at the Bosa Centre for Film and Animation at Capilano University.

Daniel Tseghay is an editor for The Mainlander, a Vancouver-Coast Salish Territories publication covering social and political issues. He has written for the Georgia Straight, The Toronto Star, The Tyee, and others. He is a collective member of No One Is Illegal-Vancouver Coast Salish Territories, and active in local political and activist projects.

Peyman Vahabzadeh is Associate Professor of Sociology and Director of Cultural, Social, and Political Thought (CSPT) Program at University of Victoria He is the author of Articulated Experiences: Toward A Radical Phenomenology of Contemporary Social Movements (SUNY Press, 2003), A Guerrilla Odyssey: and the Fadai Period of National Liberation in Iran, 1970-1979 (Syracuse University Press, 2010), and Exilic Meditations: Essays on A Displaced Life (H&S Media, 2013), the guest editor of the special issue of West Coast Line on “Writing Rupture: Iranian Emigration Literature” (2003) and special issue of Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory on “Democracy at the Time of Politics of Fright” (2007). He is also the author of nine books in Persian. His essays, poems, short stories, and interviews have appeared in English, Persian, Kurdish, and German.

Ellen Vaillancourt is a designer and peace-maker. Trained as a couturier at Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne, Paris, France, she returned to Vancouver in 1985 and pursued a Diploma in Business and Marketing before launching a series of private label manufacturing and consulting businesses. In 2002, she transitioned to Simon Fraser University’s Office of International Development where she managed several CIDA funded Economic Development and Women’s Empowerment projects. Currently she oversees a wide range of activities at the Centre for the Comparative Study of Muslim Societies and Cultures. Working with faculty and key stakeholders, she moves conceptual frameworks to implementation and action with her real and virtual teams. Her own research interest on the healing and transformative effects of beauty has recently brought her to Mongolia, Hong Kong, Nepal, Qatar, Albania, Turkey, Morocco, parts of Europe and the UK. She is continually envisioning and implementing projects while connecting people and organizations around the globe. Spring 2013 realized the birth of Steps to Peace, her fledgling organization with it’s vision and focus on beauty as a means to heal, connect and transform people – through creative works, dialogue and engagement.

Willow Verkerk is a doctoral candidate at the Institute of Philosophy, University of Leuven, Belgium. She specializes in 19th and 20th century German and French philosophy, contemporary feminist thought, and posthumanism. Her dissertation, Radicalizing Friendship: Nietzsche on Knowledge-seeking, Recognition, and Identity, examines the writings of Nietzsche, Aristotle, Kant, and Irigaray. Her work has appeared in Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPhilosophy and Literature, and Nietzsche’s Therapeutic Teaching (Bloomsbury).

Jerry Zaslove is a teacher and writer who studied Comparative Literature at Western Reserve University and the University of Washington. Since 1965 when he came to Simon Fraser University  he has taught Literature, Humanities, and the Social History of Art, influenced but not limited by the traditions of the relationship of radical thinking to the arts, psychoanalysis, and anarchism. He is the Founding Director of the Institute for the Humanities and has published numerous essays and monographs on the subjects he loves and teaches.

I am sχɬemtəna:t / Audrey Siegl. My mother's family is from Musqueam.  My father's family has Bavarian, Austrian, German, British, French, Jewish & East Indian roots.  My job is to speak for those who can not speak for themselves and to represent for my ancestors...to carry on their work. I am proud to use my language, songs and truth to open hearts and minds so we can all re-connect and create better days for all.
nə́c̓amət ct
We are one

Ken Seigneurie is Professor and Director of the Program in World Literature. He studies the relationships between literary culture and humanist thought in world literature with special emphasis on the Arab world. His most recent book is a translation from the Arabic of ‘Awdat al-almānī ila rushdih by Rashid al-Daif, published in: What Makes a Man? Sex Talk in Beirut and Berlin (University of Texas Press, 2015). His previous publications include: Standing by the Ruins: Elegiac Humanism in Wartime and Postwar Lebanon (Fordham University Press, 2011) and Crisis and Memory: The Representation of Space in Modern Levantine Narrative(Reichert, 2003). He is currently working as General Editor of the upcoming Wiley-Blackwell Companion to World Literature. Prior to coming to SFU, he lived and worked in Lebanon for thirteen years. He began his career in the 1980s as a Paris-based journalist specializing in human rights in Eastern Europe and the Middle East.

Karl Siegler joined Talonbooks in 1974 as its business manager; began to assume his editorial duties at the company in 1979; and was its publisher from 1984 to 2011. He has contributed substantially to the development of literature, the arts and culture in Canada, not only at Talonbooks, but also as the co-founder of the Association of Book Publishers of BC [ABPBC] in 1974; the Literary Press Group [LPG] in 1975; and the Simon Fraser University Centre for Studies in Publishing in 1987. President of both the ABPBC and the LPG numerous times since their founding, he has also served as President of the Association of Canadian Publishers [ACP] three times: in 1984-85; 1992-93; and 1993-94. In addition to his work on countless committees related to book publishing in Canada over the years, he also authored the Cultural Industries Policy of the Province of Manitoba in 1983; and served as a board member of the Canadian Conference of the Arts for two terms, from 2001 to 2008, where he was Vice President and Chairman of its Policy and Advocacy Committee during his second term.

Jeremy Isao Speier is a Japanese-Canadian Vancouver-based interdisciplinary artist who graduated from Emily Carr College of Art & Design in 1992. He works in film/video, kinetic sculpture and sound, and installation. He has exhibited extensively across Canada in numerous solo and group exhibitions, and recently in 2011 at Blim Arts Society and Powell Street Festival, in 2012 at the Firehall Arts Centre, and in 2013 at Nikkei National Museum & Cultural Centre with an exhibition catalogue, Double Zero: The Point Between Future Past, (2013). Speier is currently editor for an artist book project and art publication, Little Tokyo Collaborative Essay Series, which has evolved and departed from his 2012 exhibition. www.jeremyisaospeier.com

Michael Thoma is a screenwriter, story editor, author and educator. He teaches at the Bosa Centre for Film and Animation at Capilano University.

Daniel Tseghay is an editor for The Mainlander, a Vancouver-Coast Salish Territories publication covering social and political issues. He has written for the Georgia Straight, The Toronto Star, The Tyee, and others. He is a collective member of No One Is Illegal-Vancouver Coast Salish Territories, and active in local political and activist projects.

Peyman Vahabzadeh is Associate Professor of Sociology and Director of Cultural, Social, and Political Thought (CSPT) Program at University of Victoria He is the author of Articulated Experiences: Toward A Radical Phenomenology of Contemporary Social Movements (SUNY Press, 2003), A Guerrilla Odyssey: and the Fadai Period of National Liberation in Iran, 1970-1979 (Syracuse University Press, 2010), and Exilic Meditations: Essays on A Displaced Life (H&S Media, 2013), the guest editor of the special issue of West Coast Line on “Writing Rupture: Iranian Emigration Literature” (2003) and special issue of Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory on “Democracy at the Time of Politics of Fright” (2007). He is also the author of nine books in Persian. His essays, poems, short stories, and interviews have appeared in English, Persian, Kurdish, and German.

Ellen Vaillancourt is a designer and peace-maker. Trained as a couturier at Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne, Paris, France, she returned to Vancouver in 1985 and pursued a Diploma in Business and Marketing before launching a series of private label manufacturing and consulting businesses. In 2002, she transitioned to Simon Fraser University’s Office of International Development where she managed several CIDA funded Economic Development and Women’s Empowerment projects. Currently she oversees a wide range of activities at the Centre for the Comparative Study of Muslim Societies and Cultures. Working with faculty and key stakeholders, she moves conceptual frameworks to implementation and action with her real and virtual teams. Her own research interest on the healing and transformative effects of beauty has recently brought her to Mongolia, Hong Kong, Nepal, Qatar, Albania, Turkey, Morocco, parts of Europe and the UK. She is continually envisioning and implementing projects while connecting people and organizations around the globe. Spring 2013 realized the birth of Steps to Peace, her fledgling organization with it’s vision and focus on beauty as a means to heal, connect and transform people – through creative works, dialogue and engagement.

Willow Verkerk is a doctoral candidate at the Institute of Philosophy, University of Leuven, Belgium. She specializes in 19th and 20th century German and French philosophy, contemporary feminist thought, and posthumanism. Her dissertation, Radicalizing Friendship: Nietzsche on Knowledge-seeking, Recognition, and Identity, examines the writings of Nietzsche, Aristotle, Kant, and Irigaray. Her work has appeared in Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPhilosophy and Literature, and Nietzsche’s Therapeutic Teaching (Bloomsbury).

Jerry Zaslove is a teacher and writer who studied Comparative Literature at Western Reserve University and the University of Washington. Since 1965 when he came to Simon Fraser University  he has taught Literature, Humanities, and the Social History of Art, influenced but not limited by the traditions of the relationship of radical thinking to the arts, psychoanalysis, and anarchism. He is the Founding Director of the Institute for the Humanities and has published numerous essays and monographs on the subjects he loves and teaches.

I am sχɬemtəna:t / Audrey Siegl. My mother's family is from Musqueam.  My father's family has Bavarian, Austrian, German, British, French, Jewish & East Indian roots.  My job is to speak for those who can not speak for themselves and to represent for my ancestors...to carry on their work. I am proud to use my language, songs and truth to open hearts and minds so we can all re-connect and create better days for all.
nə́c̓amət ct
We are one

Ken Seigneurie is Professor and Director of the Program in World Literature. He studies the relationships between literary culture and humanist thought in world literature with special emphasis on the Arab world. His most recent book is a translation from the Arabic of ‘Awdat al-almānī ila rushdih by Rashid al-Daif, published in: What Makes a Man? Sex Talk in Beirut and Berlin (University of Texas Press, 2015). His previous publications include: Standing by the Ruins: Elegiac Humanism in Wartime and Postwar Lebanon (Fordham University Press, 2011) and Crisis and Memory: The Representation of Space in Modern Levantine Narrative(Reichert, 2003). He is currently working as General Editor of the upcoming Wiley-Blackwell Companion to World Literature. Prior to coming to SFU, he lived and worked in Lebanon for thirteen years. He began his career in the 1980s as a Paris-based journalist specializing in human rights in Eastern Europe and the Middle East.

Karl Siegler joined Talonbooks in 1974 as its business manager; began to assume his editorial duties at the company in 1979; and was its publisher from 1984 to 2011. He has contributed substantially to the development of literature, the arts and culture in Canada, not only at Talonbooks, but also as the co-founder of the Association of Book Publishers of BC [ABPBC] in 1974; the Literary Press Group [LPG] in 1975; and the Simon Fraser University Centre for Studies in Publishing in 1987. President of both the ABPBC and the LPG numerous times since their founding, he has also served as President of the Association of Canadian Publishers [ACP] three times: in 1984-85; 1992-93; and 1993-94. In addition to his work on countless committees related to book publishing in Canada over the years, he also authored the Cultural Industries Policy of the Province of Manitoba in 1983; and served as a board member of the Canadian Conference of the Arts for two terms, from 2001 to 2008, where he was Vice President and Chairman of its Policy and Advocacy Committee during his second term.

Jeremy Isao Speier is a Japanese-Canadian Vancouver-based interdisciplinary artist who graduated from Emily Carr College of Art & Design in 1992. He works in film/video, kinetic sculpture and sound, and installation. He has exhibited extensively across Canada in numerous solo and group exhibitions, and recently in 2011 at Blim Arts Society and Powell Street Festival, in 2012 at the Firehall Arts Centre, and in 2013 at Nikkei National Museum & Cultural Centre with an exhibition catalogue, Double Zero: The Point Between Future Past, (2013). Speier is currently editor for an artist book project and art publication, Little Tokyo Collaborative Essay Series, which has evolved and departed from his 2012 exhibition. www.jeremyisaospeier.com

Michael Thoma is a screenwriter, story editor, author and educator. He teaches at the Bosa Centre for Film and Animation at Capilano University.

Daniel Tseghay is an editor for The Mainlander, a Vancouver-Coast Salish Territories publication covering social and political issues. He has written for the Georgia Straight, The Toronto Star, The Tyee, and others. He is a collective member of No One Is Illegal-Vancouver Coast Salish Territories, and active in local political and activist projects.

Peyman Vahabzadeh is Associate Professor of Sociology and Director of Cultural, Social, and Political Thought (CSPT) Program at University of Victoria He is the author of Articulated Experiences: Toward A Radical Phenomenology of Contemporary Social Movements (SUNY Press, 2003), A Guerrilla Odyssey: and the Fadai Period of National Liberation in Iran, 1970-1979 (Syracuse University Press, 2010), and Exilic Meditations: Essays on A Displaced Life (H&S Media, 2013), the guest editor of the special issue of West Coast Line on “Writing Rupture: Iranian Emigration Literature” (2003) and special issue of Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory on “Democracy at the Time of Politics of Fright” (2007). He is also the author of nine books in Persian. His essays, poems, short stories, and interviews have appeared in English, Persian, Kurdish, and German.

Ellen Vaillancourt is a designer and peace-maker. Trained as a couturier at Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne, Paris, France, she returned to Vancouver in 1985 and pursued a Diploma in Business and Marketing before launching a series of private label manufacturing and consulting businesses. In 2002, she transitioned to Simon Fraser University’s Office of International Development where she managed several CIDA funded Economic Development and Women’s Empowerment projects. Currently she oversees a wide range of activities at the Centre for the Comparative Study of Muslim Societies and Cultures. Working with faculty and key stakeholders, she moves conceptual frameworks to implementation and action with her real and virtual teams. Her own research interest on the healing and transformative effects of beauty has recently brought her to Mongolia, Hong Kong, Nepal, Qatar, Albania, Turkey, Morocco, parts of Europe and the UK. She is continually envisioning and implementing projects while connecting people and organizations around the globe. Spring 2013 realized the birth of Steps to Peace, her fledgling organization with it’s vision and focus on beauty as a means to heal, connect and transform people – through creative works, dialogue and engagement.

Willow Verkerk is a doctoral candidate at the Institute of Philosophy, University of Leuven, Belgium. She specializes in 19th and 20th century German and French philosophy, contemporary feminist thought, and posthumanism. Her dissertation, Radicalizing Friendship: Nietzsche on Knowledge-seeking, Recognition, and Identity, examines the writings of Nietzsche, Aristotle, Kant, and Irigaray. Her work has appeared in Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPhilosophy and Literature, and Nietzsche’s Therapeutic Teaching (Bloomsbury).

Jerry Zaslove is a teacher and writer who studied Comparative Literature at Western Reserve University and the University of Washington. Since 1965 when he came to Simon Fraser University  he has taught Literature, Humanities, and the Social History of Art, influenced but not limited by the traditions of the relationship of radical thinking to the arts, psychoanalysis, and anarchism. He is the Founding Director of the Institute for the Humanities and has published numerous essays and monographs on the subjects he loves and teaches.

Karl Siegler joined Talonbooks in 1974 as its business manager; began to assume his editorial duties at the company in 1979; and was its publisher from 1984 to 2011. He has contributed substantially to the development of literature, the arts and culture in Canada, not only at Talonbooks, but also as the co-founder of the Association of Book Publishers of BC [ABPBC] in 1974; the Literary Press Group [LPG] in 1975; and the Simon Fraser University Centre for Studies in Publishing in 1987. President of both the ABPBC and the LPG numerous times since their founding, he has also served as President of the Association of Canadian Publishers [ACP] three times: in 1984-85; 1992-93; and 1993-94. In addition to his work on countless committees related to book publishing in Canada over the years, he also authored the Cultural Industries Policy of the Province of Manitoba in 1983; and served as a board member of the Canadian Conference of the Arts for two terms, from 2001 to 2008, where he was Vice President and Chairman of its Policy and Advocacy Committee during his second term.

Erin Soros is a writer, theorist and oral historian. She worked for eleven years as a social advocate in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, first as a rape crisis counsellor then as a coordinator of literacy programs for marginalized youth, collaborating with First Nation and multicultural organizations to create intergenerational education linking oral and literate forms of storytelling. She has an MA from UBC, an MFA from Columbia University and a PhD from the University of East Anglia where she taught psychoanalysis, modern literature and human rights. Her essays weave narrative, psychoanalysis and continental philosophy to explore ethical and social crises. Her stories build from oral and archival history, exploring tensions and intimacies between immigrant and First Nation loggers. These works have been published in international journals and anthologies and produced for the CBC and BBC as winners of the CBC Literary Award and the Commonwealth Award for the Short Story. Soros has been a writer-in-residence at four universities, including Cambridge where her position as the Harper-Wood fellow of St. John’s College funded travel to research the oral history of Inuvialuit communities in Canada’s Western Arctic.

Jeremy Isao Speier is a Japanese-Canadian Vancouver-based interdisciplinary artist who graduated from Emily Carr College of Art & Design in 1992. He works in film/video, kinetic sculpture and sound, and installation. He has exhibited extensively across Canada in numerous solo and group exhibitions, and recently in 2011 at Blim Arts Society and Powell Street Festival, in 2012 at the Firehall Arts Centre, and in 2013 at Nikkei National Museum & Cultural Centre with an exhibition catalogue, Double Zero: The Point Between Future Past, (2013). Speier is currently editor for an artist book project and art publication, Little Tokyo Collaborative Essay Series, which has evolved and departed from his 2012 exhibition. www.jeremyisaospeier.com

Nicholas Steinberg is a medical student at the University of British Columbia. He has a B.Sc. Honours in Mathematics from UBC and is an alumnus of the Humanities undergraduate programme of Simon Fraser University. He received the 2015 Mahatma Gandhi Annual Student Award for his advocacy of public health care solutions and improved care of people with mental and cognitive disorders. He is currently applying his computer programming experience to research on a new technique of the medical imaging of multiple sclerosis for the UBC Faculty of Medicine. His interests are psychoanalysis, history of ideas, and microhistory.

Michael Thoma is a screenwriter, story editor, author and educator. He teaches at the Bosa Centre for Film and Animation at Capilano University.

Daniel Tseghay is an editor for The Mainlander, a Vancouver-Coast Salish Territories publication covering social and political issues. He has written for the Georgia Straight, The Toronto Star, The Tyee, and others. He is a collective member of No One Is Illegal-Vancouver Coast Salish Territories, and active in local political and activist projects.

Peyman Vahabzadeh is Associate Professor of Sociology and Director of Cultural, Social, and Political Thought (CSPT) Program at University of Victoria He is the author of Articulated Experiences: Toward A Radical Phenomenology of Contemporary Social Movements (SUNY Press, 2003), A Guerrilla Odyssey: and the Fadai Period of National Liberation in Iran, 1970-1979 (Syracuse University Press, 2010), and Exilic Meditations: Essays on A Displaced Life (H&S Media, 2013), the guest editor of the special issue of West Coast Line on “Writing Rupture: Iranian Emigration Literature” (2003) and special issue of Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory on “Democracy at the Time of Politics of Fright” (2007). He is also the author of nine books in Persian. His essays, poems, short stories, and interviews have appeared in English, Persian, Kurdish, and German.

Ellen Vaillancourt is a designer, peacemaker and creative development strategist. A passion for Beauty and the ability to make unusual connections has led her from couture to culture: From fashion school in Paris, to facilitating multi-million dollar CIDA funded local and international projects in areas of Adult Education for Economic Development and sustainable Women’s Empowerment initiatives, to conducting research on the transformative and healing effects of beauty in myriad countries in South East Asia, the Middle East and Gulf regions, Africa, and Europe. At SFUs "Centre for Muslim Societies and Cultures" – the first of its kind in North America – Ellen developed, implemented, and oversaw the organization's operations and a wide range of educational programs and outreach initiatives. Her role concentrated on building bridges between increasingly plural and diverse societies and advocating for Islam. By uniting for humanity and the spirit of earth, we are able to reshape organizations and marketplaces to flourish in harmony with the earth. This reciprocity inspires and ennobles a beautiful new human prosperity, and involves the art and science of weaving webs within human ecology, between people of diverse cultures, as compassionate co-creators of the natural, built, and social world we share.  This is my passion.

Willow Verkerk is a Lecturer in Philosophy at the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy at Kingston University, London. She specializes in 19th and 20th Century German and French Philosophy, Political Theory, and Feminist Philosophy. Her work has appeared in Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPhilosophy and LiteraturePhilosophy Now, and Nietzsche’s Therapeutic Teaching (Bloomsbury). 

Jerry Zaslove is a teacher and writer who studied Comparative Literature at Western Reserve University and the University of Washington. Since 1965 at Simon Fraser University he has taught Literature and Humanities, influenced but not limited by the traditions of the relationship of social radicalisms and the arts, the worlds of psychoanalysis and aesthetics. He is the Founding Director of the Institute for the Humanities and has published numerous essays and monographs on the subjects he loves and teaches. Currently Simons Chair in Graduate Liberal Studies.