Cell and Development Biology

Molecular genetic approaches are applied to the cell and developmental biology of model systems. Our interests cover a broad range of topics, including signal transduction, cilia, morphogenesis, cell death and autophagy, cytoskeleton, gene expression, cell division and polarity.

In our laboratory, we exploit molecular genetics, biochemistry, and genomics to understand how the cell coordinates the transfer of molecular cargo between internal membranes to regulate its growth.

Email: 

CHRISTOPHER BEH
ctbeh@sfu.ca

Lab Room:

SSB 7179 / 7141

Lab Phone: 

(778) 782-5931

The study of autophagy (= “self-eating”) has generated tremendous attention due to the recognition that autophagy is involved in multiple developmental processes and various human diseases including cancer.

Email: 

SHARON GORSKI
sgorski@bcgsc.ca

Lab Room:

BCCA Genome Sciences Centre 7-124

Lab Phone:

(604) 675-8000 (local 7905)

We are interested in organismal development, in particular epithelial and synaptic development, and use the fruit fly Drosophila as a model system.

Email: 

NICHOLAS HARDEN
nharden@sfu.ca

Lab Room:

SSB 7128

Lab Phone: 

(778) 782-5642

The Hawkins lab uses C. elegans to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying asymmetric cell division.

Email: 

NANCY HAWKINS
nhawkins@sfu.ca 

Lab Room: 

SSB 7179

Lab Phone: 

(778) 782-5931

Our laboratory use quantitative microscopy approaches to study the role of mechanical forces, cytoskeleton and membrane dynamics in the innate immune response to microbial infections and cancer.

Email: 

VALENTIN JAUMOUILLÉ
v_jaumouille@sfu.ca

Lab Room: 

SSB 7144

Lab Phone: 

TBD

The focus of our studies is to identify and characterise proteins found within the cilium, an evolutionarily ancient microtubule-based organelle found on virtually all human cells.

Email: 

MICHEL LEROUX
leroux@sfu.ca

Lab Room: 

SSB 6144

Lab Phone: 

(778) 782-5785

Over the past dozen years, science has learned that a number of human diseases, including polycystic kidney diseases, Bardet-Beidl syndrome, and various forms of retinal degeneration are caused by defective cilia.

Email: 

LYNNE QUARMBY
quarmby@sfu.ca

Lab Room: 

B 7204

Lab Phone: 

(778) 782-4598

In the Verheyen lab we use molecular, genetic and biochemical approaches to understand organismal growth and patterning.

Email: 

ESTHER VERHEYEN
everheye@sfu.ca 

Lab Room:

SSB 7152

Lab Phone: 

(778) 782-4239