Spring 2019 - BISC 407 D100

Population Dynamics (3)

Class Number: 2590

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
    AQ 5037, Burnaby

    Th 9:30 AM – 11:20 AM
    WMC 2202, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Apr 12, 2019
    8:30 AM – 11:30 AM
    SSCK 9500, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    BISC 102 and either BISC 204 or GEOG 215, all with a grade of C- or better.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

An evaluation of factors influencing the natural fluctuation and regulation of plant and animal population numbers.

COURSE DETAILS:

Using a combination of theory and applied exercises students will explore various facets of population biology and evaluate the factors influencing the natural fluctuation and regulation of plant and animal populations.

Course Outline:
  • Population growth (exponential, logistic, age-structured: life table analysis & projection matrix) 
  • Stability, oscillations, chaos in pop dynamics 
  • Species interactions (competition, predator-prey, host-parasitoid, host-pathogen) 
  • Spatial distribution (population dispersion, source-sink dynamics, metapopulation) 
  • Population estimation 
  • Case studies

Grading

  • Labs/Tutorials 30%
  • Midterm exam 30%
  • Final exam 40%

Materials

MATERIALS + SUPPLIES:

STATISTICAL PACKAGE: Free software R (Rstudio) will be used during lectures and tutorials. Students are strongly encouraged to bring laptop computers to both lecture and tutorial.

REQUIRED READING:

Gotelli, Nicholas J., A Primer of Ecology

Stevens, M. H. H. 2009. A primer of ecology with R (SFU library, ebook)

RECOMMENDED READING:

Rockwood, L.L. 2006. Introduction to population ecology (SFU library, paperback)

Turchin, P. 2003. Complex population dynamics: a theoretical/empirical synthesis (SFU library, ebook)

Thompson, S.K. 2012. Sampling (SFU library, ebook)

Buckland, S.T., et al. 1993. Distance Sampling: Estimating Abundance of Biological Populations. Chapman and Hall, London.

Krebs, C.J. 1999. Ecological Methodology (ed 2)

Otto, SP and Day, T, 2007. A Biologist's Guide to Mathematical Modeling in Ecology and Evolution

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS