Fall 2021 - PHIL 150 D100

Great Works in the History of Philosophy (3)

Class Number: 7503

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
    AQ 3154, Burnaby

    We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
    AQ 3150, Burnaby

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

A thematic survey of some classical texts in the history of Western philosophy, from late Antiquity to the 19th century, including by figures such as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, de Gournay, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Spinoza, Leibniz, du Ch√Ętelet, Hume, Astell, Wollstonecraft, Kant, Mill, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and others. Themes may include the nature of the human being, the role of God in philosophical thought, conceptions of the good life, and others. Open to all students. Students with credit for PHIL 151 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

COURSE DETAILS:

In this course you will learn about classic philosophical texts from Asia. Each week we will cover a different text and discuss the philosophical issues it raises. The texts all deal with understanding the nature of the world and how you should live. We will read excerpts from classics from India (the Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita), China (Kongzi, Mengzi, Laozi, and Zhuangzi), and also trace the spread and development of Buddhism (through figures like Nagarjuna, Shantideva, and Dogen).

Important: If you took PHIL 357 in Fall 2020 you may not take this course for further credit. 

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

PHIL 150 may be applied towards the Breadth-Humanities Requirement. It is a required course for the Philosophy Major

After taking this course you will not only be familiar with a range of classic texts from a variety of cultures in Asia, but you will also:

  • Understand the philosophical insights, issues, and major concepts of each text
  • Better understand specific issues surrounding translation and interpretation
  • Be able to read and understand philosophical classics from Asia in a responsible way on your own

 

Grading

  • Weekly responses that include short excerpts from the text for that week 60%
  • Textual analysis assignment 20%
  • A very short take-home exam 20%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

A Guide to Asian Philosophy Classics by Puqun Li (ISBN: 978-1554810345)

All other readings will be posted online.


Department Undergraduate Notes:

Thinking of a Philosophy Major or Minor? The Concentration in Law and Philosophy? The Certificate in Ethics? The Philosophy and Methodology of Science Certificate?
Contact the PHIL Advisor at philmgr@sfu.ca   More details on our website: SFU Philosophy

New elective grade policy : P/CR/NC, pilot project for Spring/Summer/Fall 2021. List of exclusions for the new policy. Specifically for Philosophy: 

  • Students can use a P or CR to satisfy any requirement for a major, joint major, honours, or minor in Philosophy (with the exception of Honours tutorials).
  • Students can use a P or CR to satisfy any prerequisite requirement for any PHIL course.
  • Students can use a P (but not a CR) to satisfy any requirement for the Ethics Certificate, or the Philosophy and Methodology of Science Certificate.
  • Philosophy Majors and Honours students can use a P (but not a CR) to satisfy any WQB requirement.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

TEACHING AT SFU IN FALL 2021

Teaching at SFU in fall 2021 will involve primarily in-person instruction, with approximately 70 to 80 per cent of classes in person/on campus, with safety plans in place.  Whether your course will be in-person or through remote methods will be clearly identified in the schedule of classes.  You will also know at enrollment whether remote course components will be “live” (synchronous) or at your own pace (asynchronous).

Enrolling in a course acknowledges that you are able to attend in whatever format is required.  You should not enroll in a course that is in-person if you are not able to return to campus, and should be aware that remote study may entail different modes of learning, interaction with your instructor, and ways of getting feedback on your work than may be the case for in-person classes.

Students with hidden or visible disabilities who may need class or exam accommodations, including in the context of remote learning, are advised to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (caladmin@sfu.ca or 778-782-3112) as early as possible in order to prepare for the fall 2021 term.