Fall 2022 - SA 442 E100

Applying the Sociological Imagination (S) (4)

Indigenous-SettlerRelations

Class Number: 3539

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    We 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
    AQ 2104, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    Minimum of 72 units including either SA 101 or SA 150.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Selected Topics in Sociology. Seminar exploring the topic through discussion, and developing original ideas that engage with sociological theory and methods. Course topic varies with the instructor and section. See detailed course outline for more information. Students may repeat this course for further credit under a different topic.

COURSE DETAILS:

Indigenous-settler relations is a broad area of study that entails the structured inequalities that been built in the colonial past and present, but also the analysis of resurgence and decolonization. This course is concerned with providing an understanding of the contemporary state of Indigenous relations with settlers by examining the different spaces, knowledges, and relationalities produced in this in this relationship. The course is sociological, but interdisciplinary and builds on several broad themes found in sociology of Indigenous people, Indigenous studies, Indigenous political theory, settler-colonial studies, and critical legal theory. The course begins by posing the question of the problem of Indigenous-settler relations informed by Indigenous thinkers, and framed by concerns, knowledges, and theories from Indigenous scholars and allies. Some of the specific questions we will grapple with in this course include racism, whiteness, property, and possession; conflicts over land, borders, and mapping; the science, spatiality, and biopolitics of Indigenous identity; and the role of numbers, budgets and taxes in relation to Indigenous-Canada relations. The course ends with discussion of the future of reconciliation, decolonization, allyship and future of Indigenous sovereignty in the context of Indigenous-settler relationship building.

Grading

  • Reflection Paper 15%
  • Group Presentation 25%
  • Document Analysis 35%
  • Participation 25%

NOTES:

Grading: Where a final exam is scheduled and the student does not write the exam or withdraw from the course before the deadline date, an N grade will be assigned. Unless otherwise specified on the course syllabus, all graded assignments for this course must be completed for a final grade other than N to be assigned. An N is considered as an F for the purposes of scholastic standing.

Grading System: The Undergraduate Course Grading System is as follows:

A+ (95-100) | A (90-94) | A- (85-89) | B+ (80-84) | B (75-79) | B- (70-74) | C+ (65-69) | C (60-64) | C- (55-59) | D (50-54) | F (0-49) | N*
*N standing to indicate the student did not complete course requirements

Academic Honesty and Student Conduct Policies: The Department of Sociology & Anthropology follows SFU policy in relation to grading practices, grade appeals (Policy T20.01), and academic honesty and student conduct procedures (S10‐S10.05). Unless otherwise informed by your instructor in writing, in graded written assignments you must cite the sources you rely on and include a bibliography/list of references, following an instructor-approved citation style. It is the responsibility of students to inform themselves of the content of SFU policies available on the SFU website.

Centre for Accessible Learning: Students with hidden or visible disabilities who believe they may need classroom or exam accommodations are encouraged to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (1250 Maggie Benston Centre) as soon as possible to ensure that they are eligible and that approved accommodations and services are implemented in a timely fashion.

The Sociology and Anthropology Student Union, SASU, is a governing body of students who are engaged with the department and want to build the SA community. Get involved!  Follow Facebook and Instagram pages or visit our website.

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

There is no required text. All course readings will be uploaded on canvas.

 


Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html