Spring 2022 - BISC 309 D100

Conservation Biology (3)

Class Number: 1972

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
    AQ 5018, Burnaby

    Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
    AQ 5018, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    BISC 204 with a grade of C- or better.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

An examination of the primary threats to biodiversity, how biological processes contribute to the persistence of populations and structure of communities, and species and landscape approaches to conservation in the real world. Students who have taken BISC 474 in Spring 2006 or BISC 475 in Spring 2008 as special topics courses titled 'Conservation Ecology' cannot take this course for further credit.

COURSE DETAILS:

Conservation biologists seek solutions to the daunting problem of how to preserve the evolutionary potential and ecological viability of the world’s biodiversity in the face of increasing pressure from human activities. In this course, we will examine the primary threats to biological diversity, assess how genetic, ecological, and land/seascape level processes contribute to the persistence of populations and the structure of communities, and explore species and landscape approaches to managing biodiversity on a local and global scale. The course will be organized around lectures and guest lectures, supplemented with computer games, tutorial readings from the primary literature and discussions and role-playing connecting scientific research with conservation decisions in the real world.

Grading

  • • Examination 30%
  • • Essay 30%
  • • Understanding the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 10%
  • • Tutorial and quizzes 30%

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

TEACHING AT SFU IN SPRING 2022

Teaching at SFU in spring 2022 will involve primarily in-person instruction, with safety plans in place.  Some courses will still be offered through remote methods, and if so, this will be clearly identified in the schedule of classes.  You will also know at enrollment whether remote course components will be “live” (synchronous) or at your own pace (asynchronous).

Enrolling in a course acknowledges that you are able to attend in whatever format is required.  You should not enroll in a course that is in-person if you are not able to return to campus, and should be aware that remote study may entail different modes of learning, interaction with your instructor, and ways of getting feedback on your work than may be the case for in-person classes.

Students with hidden or visible disabilities who may need class or exam accommodations, including in the context of remote learning, are advised to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (caladmin@sfu.ca or 778-782-3112) as early as possible in order to prepare for the spring 2022 term.