Douglas Ross

PROFESSOR

B.A. (Hons.) (University of Toronto)
M.A. (University of Toronto)
Ph.D. (University of Toronto)

CONTACT

Email : douglasr@sfu.ca
Phone : 778-782-4782
Office Location : AQ6037A

PROFILE

Douglas A. Ross has been Full Professor of Political Science at Simon Fraser University since 1988. Major research interests include Canadian foreign and defence policies, strategic studies and arms control, approaches to grand strategy, environmental crises and national security. He is the author of a major study on Canada's involvement in the Vietnam War (University of Toronto Press, 1984) and has published in International Journal, Canadian Foreign Policy, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Canadian-American Public Policy, Canadian Public Policy, Pacific Affairs and many edited essay collections.

PUBLICATIONS FORTHCOMING

Ross, Douglas A. "From Prague to Chicago to Honolulu: Towards Nuclear Abolition and a Renewed Canadian Role in American and NATO Deterrence," in James Fergusson, After Afghanistan: Essays in Honour of Paul Buteux, Vancouver: UBC, 2014, refereed.

Ross, Douglas A. "Canadian International Security Policy in the 21st Century: Closing the Book on the Sutherland Era? Not at All." In Duane Bratt and Christopher Kukucha, eds., Readings in Canadian Foreign Policy, 3rd. ed. Oxford University Press, 2014.

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

Ross, Douglas A. "Canadian International Security Policy in the 21st Century: Closing the Book on the Sutherland Era? Not at All." In Duane Bratt and Christopher Kukucha, eds., Readings in Canadian Foreign Policy, 3rd. ed. Oxford University Press, 2014.

Ross, Douglas A. “NATO in Canadian Foreign Policy: From ‘Atlanticist’ fear and hope to a future of environmental crisis and ‘civilizational rallying’?” in Duane Bratt and Christopher Kukucha, eds., Readings in Canadian Foreign Policy, 2nd ed. 2011, Oxford University Press.

Ross, Douglas A. "Soaring Eagle, Crouching Dragon? The Likely Prospect of Continued American Hegemony," International Journal, 66(2), Spring 2011, 463-471.

Ross, Douglas A. “Canada’s International Security Strategy: Beyond Reason but not Hope?” International Journal, 65(2), Spring 2010, 349-360, refereed.

Ross, Douglas A. "Nuclear Weapons and American Grand Strategy", as chapter 6 of David S. McDonough, ed., U.S. Nuclear Strategy and the Implications for Global Security, Halifax: Dalhousie University. 2009, 93-132 (extended version of IJ article).

Ross, Douglas A. “Nuclear Weapons and American Grand Strategy: Essential pillar or terminal liability?” International Journal, 63(4), Autumn 2008, 847-873, refereed.

Ross, Douglas A. and A. Hira, “Asymmetry Squeezing Out Trilateralism? Canadian Ambivalence on U.S. Strategic Primacy,” in Imtiaz Hussein, Satya R. Pattnayak and Anil Hira, North American Homeland Security: Back to Bilateralism, Westport and London: Praeger Security International, 2008, 56-102.

Ross, Douglas A. and A. Hira, “Canada, A Land of Deep Ambivalence: Understanding the Divergent Response to US Primacy After 9/11,” Occasional Paper 68, Canadian-American Public Policy, University of Maine: December 2006, [printing/publication-distribution date, June 2008], refereed monograph, 58 pp.

Ross, Douglas A., A. Farson and R. Frost. “Iraq, Intelligence, Weapons of Mass Destruction and the Future of Non-Proliferation Multilateralism,” in Graham F. Walker, ed., The Search for WMD: Non-Proliferation, Intelligence and Pre-emption in the New Security Environment, Halifax: Dalhousie University, 2006, 199-223. 

Ross, Douglas A. The Dilemmas of American Strategic Primacy: The Future of Canadian-American Strategic Cooperation, co-edited with David S. McDonough Toronto: Royal Canadian Military Institute, 2005, 222 pp. includes one single-authored chapter on missile defence and grand strategy, and one co-authored chapter with Christopher N. B. Ross on grand strategy options for Canada, ‘From Neo-Isolationism to Imperial Liberalism.’

Ross, Douglas A. "Weapons of Mass Destruction, American Vulnerability and Canadian Political Inertia", in Alexander Netherton, A.Seager and K. Froschauer, eds., In/security: Canada in the Post 9/11 World, Burnaby, Simon Fraser University. 2005, 61-98. 

Ross, Douglas A. "Ten Years After: The Inevitable Waning of Huntington's Civilizational Clash Thesis?" in Mark Charlton, ed., Crosscurrents: International Relations, 4th ed. Toronto: Nelson/Thomson, 2005, 73-89.

Ross, Douglas A. "Michael Ignatieff's Truncated View of Canadian-American Relations," in Frank Harvey and Graham F. Walker, eds., Independence in an Age of Empires: Assessing Multilateralism and Unilateralism, Halifax: Dalhousie University. March 2004.

Ross, Douglas A. "Foreign policy challenges for Paul Martin: Canada’s international security policy in an era of American hyperpower and continental vulnerability," International Journal, 65(4), Autumn 2003, 533-571, refereed journal.

Ross, Douglas A. Charles F. Doran, Brian L. Job, Frank Langdon, Michael K. Hawes, Douglas Ross, Pacific Partners: Canada and the United States, Washington, London, Cambridge: Brassey’s/Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis, 1994.

Ross, Douglas A. Pacific Security 2010: Canadian Perspectives on Pacific Security into the 21st Century, co-edited and three co-authored chapters with Mary L. Goldie, published as Aurora Papers 10, Ottawa: Canadian Centre for Arms Control and Disarmament, 1991, 84 pp. and iv.

Ross, Douglas A. From Coexistence to Cooperation: International Law and Organization in the Post-War Era, co-edited with E. McWhinney, G. Tunkin and V. Vereshchetin, Dordrecht, Boston, London: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 1991, 297 pp. and xiv.

Ross, Douglas A. Superpower Maritime Strategy in the Pacific, co-edited (and two co-authored contributory chapters) with Frank C. Langdon, London, New York: Routledge, U.K., 1990, 295 pp. and xvii.

Ross, Douglas A. In the Interests of Peace: Canada and Vietnam, 1954-1973, Toronto, Buffalo, London: University of Toronto Press, 1984, 484 pp.

Ross, Douglas A. and P. Mueller. China and Japan: Emerging Global Powers, New York and Washington: Praeger Publishers, 1975, 218 pp.