Should a Just Recovery Include a Basic Income for B.C.?

We're pleased to partner with SFU Labour Studies for the fourth webinar in their series Just Recovery? Organizing, Labour and the Future We Want.

This panel will look at the recommendations and analysis of the Final Report of the British Columbia Expert Panel on Basic Income to ask: should a just recovery for all include a basic income?

Speakers will also discuss the report’s recommendations, including improved wages for low-paid workers and a more just labour market for B.C. Join us for this important discussion!

When

Friday, June 25, 2021

12:00PM (PT)

Online event

A link to join the event will be sent out via email the day before the event.

Those who register after 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, June 24 will receive a link to the webinar by 11:00 a.m. on Friday, June 25.

Speakers

Kaitlyn Matulewicz

Kaitlyn Matulewicz is the executive director of the Worker Solidarity Network (formerly the Retail Action Network) and the co-chair of the BC Employment Standards Coalition. Kaitlyn comes to her organizing work with seven years' experience working in restaurants. After getting tired of managers telling her to dress "classy provocative" on the job (yes, those were their actual words), Kaitlyn joined a community of workers to fight for fair and decent working conditions in B.C.

David Green

David Green is a professor in the Vancouver School of Economics at UBC. He received his BA from Queen’s University and his PhD from Stanford. His areas of research interest include income inequality, immigration, the impact of technical change on the labour market, and policies affecting labour market outcomes. He is a former editor of the Canadian Journal of Economics, an international research associate with the Institute for Fiscal Studies in London, and a research associate with the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.

Chuka Ejeckam

Chuka Ejeckam is the director of research and policy at the BC Federation of Labour (BCFED), and a Research Associate with the BC office of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. He holds a bachelor's degree in rhetoric from the University of Winnipeg, and a combined bachelor's degree in political science and philosophy from the University of British Columbia (UBC). He is currently enrolled in the master's degree program in political science at UBC. His academic work focuses on reparative drug policy, structural racism, and both political and economic inequality. His work at the BCFED focuses on the changing world of work, including deindustrialization, precarious employment, automation and AI, and climate change.

Partners

Accessibility, Technology & Privacy

Registration and password

A link to join the event will be sent out to registrants via email the day before the event. Those who register after 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, June 24 will receive a link to the webinar by 11:00 a.m. on Friday, June 25.

Technology requirements

This workshop will be presented in a participatory webinar format. To engage fully you will need:

  • A laptop, computer, or smartphone
  • A webcam
  • A microphone
  • Speakers or headphones

Protecting your privacy

To ensure that we are using online meeting technology in a privacy-conscious way, we are following best practices for this online event series:

  • We will only circulate the meeting link to those who are registered for the event
  • We will password protect the meeting
  • We will enable end-to-end encryption
  • We will not use attention tracking

To protect your own privacy we suggest that:

  • You use a unique email address to log into the webinar. This is so that the webinar platform can’t cross-reference your profile with the rest of your digital profiles under your email address.
  • We suggest you do not use your Facebook profile to log into the webinar. This is so that the webinar platform can’t cross-reference you with your Facebook account.
  • We remind you that whatever you say in the webinar is public and recorded, so please do not share sensitive information about yourself or others, and do not say anything you do not wish to enter the public domain.

To protect the privacy of others we ask that:

  • You do not record or photograph yourself, other participants, or the hosts during the webinar, unless permission is requested and given.