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Beau Dick: Laughter Mask, 1973. Collection of Steve Loretta. Photo: William Neville
Print
September 11, 2012

by Aboriginal Tourism BC, 2012

Carrying on “Irregardless”: Humour in Contemporary Northwest Coast Art

"Irregardless" is co–curated by Tahltan artist, stand–up comedian and curator, Peter Morin, in collaboration with the Gallery's Director of Content and Research, Dr. Martine J. Reid, who proposed the original concept of the exhibition. Most of the 60 pieces in the exhibition were produced during the last 15 years and many have not previously been exhibited. They include a rich and provocative range of works—paintings, sculptures, drawings, masks, etchings, photographs, textiles, jewelry and video installations. Works in "Irregardless" were selected for their aesthetic qualities and their sense of fun and playfulness, the two main ingredients of humour.

Works in "Irregardless" use humour, irony, parody and satire to challenge stereotypes and raise unexpected questions. "This exhibition continues the Bill Reid Gallery's growing tradition of exploring new themes in contemporary Northwest Coast art." said Mike Robinson, Executive Director, Bill Reid Gallery.

A 120-page richly illustrated companion book will be on sale in the Gallery Gift Shop, September 12th.

The exhibition will run from September 12, 2012 through March 17, 2013 at the Bill Reid Gallery in Vancouver.

Along with the exhibition, the Bill Reid Gallery will present Laughing "Irregardless": Multimedia Aboriginal Humour, a celebration of humour's power to heal and unify. Curated and moderated by Aboriginal filmmaker, Loretta Todd, the series is part of the SFU Public Square events, and will run through March 2013 (See public programs for more info).

"Irregardless" Explained
"Irregardless" was one of Bill Reid's favourite intentional misuses of a word, always with a mischievous twinkle in his eye to see if his listener "got it".

This article was published originally on Aboriginal Tourism BC on September 11,  2012.

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