Dr. Naila Makhani 

Biomedical Physiology & Kinesiology, SFU, 2000

MD, University of British Columbia, 2005

Masters of Public Health, Harvard School of Public Health, 2011

Assistant Professor, Pediatrics and Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine

Director, Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis clinic, Yale.



Dr. Makhani is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Neurology at the Yale School of Medicine and the Director of the Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Clinic at Yale. Dr. Makhani completed medical school training at the University of British Columbia in 2005. She then completed a pediatric neurology residency program at Sick Kids Hospital and the University of Toronto. She remained at the University of Toronto to take on a multiple sclerosis fellowship. She concurrently completed a Masters Degree in Public Health at Harvard. After spending a year living in Europe, Dr. Makhani accepted her current position at Yale in 2013. Dr. Makhani's research focuses on identifying risk factors for multiple sclerosis in children. She is an active member of the International Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group and has presented her work at numerous national and international conferences.



Why did you choose to go to SFU?   

I chose SFU because of the excellent reputation of the Kinesiology program and the availability of a co-op program that allowed me to obtain valuable research/work experience during my undergraduate years.

Where did you spend the most amount of time on campus?

I spent most of my time in the library, often studying in the map room because it was quiet!

What is your favorite memory from your time at SFU?

My favorite memories are the people. I met so many wonderful and talented fellow students and faculty. I loved the annual Kinesiology barbecues that brought together students, staff and faculty along with their families!

Who was your favorite SFU professor and why?

Glen Tibbits, Craig Asmundson, Tony Leyland and many other Kinesiology faculty. They all seem to love what they do and inspire a desire to learn.

How has your SFU degree impacted your career? 

My degree at SFU was the stepping stone to my career in medicine. I gained a practical grounding in anatomy and physiology, I developed my research interests and most importantly I developed my passion for continued life-long learning. I think I will always be a student in some way!

What is your favorite SFU snow story?

Snow days meant listening carefully to the radio or television anxiously in the morning to see if the buses were running and if the campus was open. A cancelled day of classes meant the unexpected gift of a free day!

If you could give advice to students today, what would you tell them?

Take a broad range of courses, develop your interests, go out of your way to try and meet people and keep doing what you love.

What is the one thing about SFU that must not change?

Bagpipes! The pipe band is a unique feature of campus life.