Helping save the critically endangered Angelshark living in the waters of the Canary Islands (Justin Wong, SFU News - Dec 19, 2016) The majestic Angelshark is one of the world’s most threatened shark species and SFU marine biology professor Nicholas Dulvy has a plan to protect the shark. Read more...

SFU researchers work to fine-tune collagen growth (Diane Mar-Nicolle & Marianne Meadahl - Dec 7, 2016) SFU researchers have identified the crucial first stage of how collagen self-assembles into fibrils. Read more...

High-resolution brain scans could improve concussion detection (SFU News - Dec 7, 2016) Simon Fraser University researchers have found that high-resolution brain scans, coupled with computational analysis, could play a critical role in helping to detect concussions that conventional scans might miss. Read more...

Evergreen Line 'cores' provide earth scientists with wealth of historical data (SFU News - Dec 1, 2016) As the long-awaited Evergreen SkyTrain Line opens this week, two SFU earth scientists are uncovering a wealth of history about the region from drill cores associated with the line’s tunnel excavation. Read more...

Scientists work to map human epigenome (SFU News - Nov 17, 2016) B.C. scientists, including Steven Jones, a professor in SFU’s Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, are playing a major role in an international effort to map the entire human epigenome—an initiative that may prove bigger than the Human Genome Project. Read more...

Understanding how the "blood-brain barrier" is breached in bacterial meningitis (SFU News - Oct 4, 2016) Simon Fraser University researcher Lisa Craig is part of an international team that has uncovered new details about a microbe that invades the brain, sometimes with fatal results. Read more...

Why Jim Woodgett wrote an open letter blasting CIHR reforms – and what comes next (Becky Rynor, University Affairs - Sep 26, 2016) Researchers at universities across the country are struggling, says Dr. Woodgett... with the next round of research applications looming, the CIHR grant system "is still a mess." Read more...

The delicate power of soft materials (Office of the Vice-President, Research - Sep 16, 2016) When Burnaby-based Nanotech Security Corp. was chosen to produce a ticket that incorporated their anti-counterfeiting technology for the 2016 Euro Cup, they turned to SFU’s Centre for Soft Materials to help them execute the task. Read more...

SFU researchers develop new tools to combat infectious diseases (SFU News - Sep 16, 2016) New funding from Genome Canada will help SFU scientists specializing in health informatics develop ways to more effectively analyse, interpret and apply big data to improve key health-related issues, from infectious disease outbreaks to managing the world’s food crops. Read more...

U.S. military takes SFU power-generating project for a test walk (Mark Hume, The Globe and Mail - July 13, 2016) An idea germinated in a biomedical lab at Simon Fraser University is being tested by the U.S. military in a research project meant to turn foot soldiers into their own power-generating stations. Read more...

Sea star death triggers ecological domino effect (Wan Yee Lok, SFU News - June 22, 2016) A new study by SFU marine ecologists Jessica Schultz, Ryan Cloutier and Isabelle Côté reveals that the mass mortality of sea stars has resulted in a domino effect on Howe Sound marine ecology. Read more...

Economics drive the extinction of large marine animals (Diane Mar-Nicolle - June 10, 2016) Research conducted by Simon Fraser University (SFU) and Colby College in Maine, finds that large marine animals are at a greater risk of extinction as a result of their large body size and their value to luxury markets, including game hunters. Read more...  

SFU spin-off tackles Progressive Supranuclear Palsy and Alzheimer’s Disease (SFU News - April 25, 2016) Almost 10 years ago, long-time friends David Vocadlo and Ernest McEachern met over coffee at Simon Fraser University’s Burnaby campus to discuss some intriguing basic research on sugar-processing enzymes. An unlikely hypothesis was beginning to emerge, that coating proteins with a bit of sugar would actually make them less sticky and block them from forming toxic clumps. Read more...

BC-led salmon genome collaboration published in Nature
(SFU News - April 18, 2016)
 SFU professor Willie Davidson is part of an international research team shedding new light on genome evolution. The researchers have established a “human” quality sequence of the Atlantic salmon genome that is now available online. Their work has been published in the prestigious journal Nature. Read more...

New way to smell a rat means end for rodents
(SFU News - April 11, 2016) The world’s burgeoning brown rat population may soon wane now that SFU scientists have identified and synthetically replicated the male brown rat’s sex pheromone. They find it is a powerful attractant for luring female brown rats into traps. Read more...

Digging for antibiotics just got easier
(Diane Mar-Nicolle - March 16, 2016) Finding molecules with antibiotic or anti-cancer properties is a labour intensive task for scientists. Yet, with a new state-of-the-art lab and equipment at hand, Roger Linington, a Department of Chemistry professor, hopes his work leads to a breakthrough in drug discovery. Read more...

SFU kinesiologist helps astronauts land safely on their feet
(Ian Bryce - March 9, 2016) 
Simon Fraser University kinesiology professor Andrew Blaber wants astronauts to see fewer stars—when they arrive back on Earth, that is. Read more...

Bed bug control closer with Scotts Canada sponsorship
(Diane Luckow - February 24, 2016) 
SFU communication ecologist Gerhard Gries says his new technology for detecting and controlling bed bugs is closer to commercialization now that Scotts Canada has become the industrial sponsor of his research chair. Read more...

Digging for antibiotics
(Diane Mar-Nicolle - February 12, 2016)
Roger Linington knows firsthand how important antibiotics are to health. They have helped him successfully recover from at least one critical infection. As the Canada Research Chair in Chemical Biology (High-Throughput Screening) Linington is on the hunt for a new class of antibiotics and he has some of the most powerful equipment in the world to help him. Read more...