Karen Armstrong, author of Fields of Blood: Religion and the History of violence, will speak at the Morris J Wosk Centre for Dialogue on Nov. 17.

people

Karen Armstrong lecture and book launch explores religion and violence

November 06, 2014
Print

Karen Armstrong, a world-renowned author, 2012 recipient of SFU’s Jack P. Blaney Award for Dialogue and 2008 TED Prize recipient, will examine religion and the history of violence at a public lecture and book launch hosted by Simon Fraser University’s Centre for Dialogue on Nov. 17.

Given the recent occurrences of extremist violence both within Canada and abroad, Armstrong’s latest book, Fields of Blood: Religion and the History of Violence provides timely insight into perceptions that faith is a source of aggression and violence.

Armstrong’s lecture will explore this topic and further expand the dialogue in conversation with The Vancouver Sun’s Douglas Todd.

Armstrong was awarded the TED Prize in 2008 in support of her call to create a Charter for Compassion, which has since been endorsed by Archbishop Desmond Tutu, the Dalai Lama, and other international leaders for its efforts in fostering greater global understanding.

Armstrong received SFU’s Jack P. Blaney Award for Dialogue for her lifetime of outstanding achievement in advancing understanding about and among world religions, and promoting compassion as a way of life. In 2013, she received the British Academy’s inaugural Nayef Al-Rodhan Prize for Transcultural Understanding.

Armstrong, a former Catholic nun who left the convent to study literature, is the author of numerous books on religion including the best-selling work, A History of God. Her writing has been translated into 45 languages.

Fields of Blood: Religion and the History of Violence will take place Monday, Nov. 17 at 7 p.m. at The Vancouver Playhouse, 600 Hamilton St. Tickets can be purchased online.