SFU’s Aboriginal Faculty Recruitment Plan provides funding for up to two new Aboriginal faculty positions each year.

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Aboriginal faculty members to increase at SFU

December 21, 2015
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The Faculty of Education has just hired the first professor to be recruited under SFU’s Aboriginal Faculty Recruitment Plan.

Established by the VP Academic’s office, the plan, which is unique in Canada, provides funding for up to two new Aboriginal faculty positions each year. The VP Academic’s office will pay for three years’ worth of salary and benefits for each new Aboriginal professor, after which the faculty must continue to support the position.

The plan’s goal, says VP Academic Jon Driver, is to encourage faculties to hire more Aboriginal professors.

Kris Magnusson, dean of education, says, “I think any incentive program is good if it can get folks thinking about the issues around increasing the number of scholars who are of Aboriginal descent. In the education field there are two issues: having scholars who are Aboriginal, and having indigenouseducation scholars.”

Since initiating the plan, the VP Academic’s office has approved three Aboriginal faculty positions—one each in business, health sciences and education. Two more positions are being considered—for the Faculty of Communication, Art and Technology, and the Faculty of Environment.

However, only the Faculty of Education has filled its Aboriginal faculty position.

“One of the problems we face is finding people to fill these positions,” says Driver. “That’s why we are also supporting generous scholarships for Aboriginal graduate students who are in programs that are likely to result in the students becoming professors.”

William Lindsay, director of SFU’s Office for Aboriginal Peoples, says Aboriginal faculty members can assist with indigenizing curriculum and programs, developing relevant community partnerships, and attracting and mentoring Aboriginal students.

“It’s a long-term project, but we’re not giving up. We’ve set up this program—now let’s see what we can do.”

This story also appears in the December 2015 issue of SFU News, Aboriginal Edition