Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street

episode

Episode 34: an ethical approach to research — with scott neufeld and nicolas crier

December 10, 2019

The question of ethics should always be front and centre when it comes to doing research of any kind. For Scott Neufeld and Nicolas Crier, they aim to take this question even further. In collaboration with other folks in the Downtown Eastside and Hives for Humanity, they co-authored Research 101: A Manifesto for Ethical Research in the Downtown Eastside to help facilitate a wider conversation on ethics in cultural production, such as research, media, and artmaking. On this episode of Below the Radar, host Am Johal talks to Scott and Nicolas about how this project came to be, the profound impact it has had for the community, and what’s at stake for ethical research in the Downtown Eastside.

Listen on: Soundcloud  |  Apple Podcasts  |  Spotify  |  Google Podcasts  |  Stitcher  |  Podyssey

Scott Neufeld

Scott Neufeld is a white settler who grew up on the unceded territory of the Kwantlen people (Langley, BC) and now lives and works in East Vancouver on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh peoples. He is a husband and father to two beautiful little boys and feels so privileged to be involved in the Community Ethics in Cultural Production project with folks in the Downtown Eastside. He has an MA in Social Psychology from Simon Fraser University (SFU) and is currently completing a PhD in Social Psychology at SFU and the BC Centre on Substance Use, with a focus on representations of people who use drugs in anti-stigma campaigns. Scott’s work has been published in the Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology, Political Psychology, the Journal of Social Issues and the Journal of Social and Political Psychology. Other research interests include social identity theory, social representations, collective resistance, NIMBYism, and decolonization.

Nicolas Crier

Nicolas Crier is an adoptee of Cree heritage. At 40 years old, he has spent approximately half his life surviving in the streets and more than a decade in the Downtown Eastside. It never occurred to him that being a drug user would ever be useful, but he has parlayed his street smarts and community connections into a successful career in  a variety of peer capacities: overdose response and rescue, outreach worker, freelance writer, actor, coordinator and facilitator for the Speakers Bureau at Megaphone Magazine, and he also sits as Secretary on the Executive Board of Directors for Pivot Legal Society and the advisory committee of the UBC Transformative Health and Justice Research cluster, and is a co-author of Research 101/A Mainfesto for Ethical Research in the DTES and proud and grateful to play a small role in the up and coming Downtown Eastside Community Research Ethics Workshop, a community effort to bring one word to the People: reciprocity.

You can access a digital copy of Research 101:  A Manifesto for Ethical Research in the Downtown Eastside here: http://bit.ly/R101Manifesto

You can also access a digital copy of the Empowering Informed Consent: Community Ethics and Cultural Production card here: https://bit.ly/2E1AiWn

You can read more about the processes of developing the manifesto on our blog: http://sfuwce.org/empowering-informed-consent-community-ethics-in-cultural-production/


Below the Radar is a weekly podcast hosted by Am Johal. We talk environmental and social justice, arts, culture, community-building and urban issues with featured guests. Hosted on the territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh peoples, this podcast is produced by SFU’s Vancity Office of Community Engagement as a part of our Knowledge Democracy Project @ 312 Main — encouraging the meaningful exchange of ideas and information across communities.

Below the Radar is a weekly podcast hosted by Am Johal. We talk environmental and social justice, arts, culture, community-building and urban issues with featured guests. Hosted on the territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh peoples, this podcast is produced by SFU’s Vancity Office of Community Engagement as a part of our Knowledge Democracy Project @ 312 Main — encouraging the meaningful exchange of ideas and information across communities.