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Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street

North of 49 Movies on Campus. Free film screenings Oct 27, November 9 & 16, 2017 and January, 18 2018.

film

October 27, 2017

Free Film Screenings | North of 49 Movies on Campus

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Admission

FREE! Tickets available at the door the day of the screening, first come, first-seated.

Details

When: October 27, November 9 & 16, 2017 and January 18, 2018.

Where: Djavad Mowafaghian Cinema, Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 W. Hastings St.

Additional Info: Presented in partnership with Telefilm Canada and the Vancouver International Film Festival.

North of 49 Movies on Campus is a series of Canadian films screenings on campuses across the country with support from Telefilm Canada and local festivals. We are thrilled to be partnering with the Vancouver International Film Festival and Telefilm Canada to screen four outstanding productions, October 27, November 9 and 16, 2017 and January 18, 2018.

Free admission! Tickets available at the door the day of the screening; first come, first-seated.

Find the screening dates, film synopsis and trailers below.

SCREENING SCHEDULE

Hello Destroyer 
Friday, October 27 | 6:30 PM
Director: Kevan Funk | Canada, 2016
110 minutes

KONELĪNE: our land beautiful
Thursday, November 9 | 6:30 PM
Director: Nettie Wild | Canada, 2016
96 minutes 

Window Horses
Thursday, November 16 | 6:30 PM
Director: Ann Marie Fleming | Canada, 2016
89 minutes 

Grand Unified Theory
Thursday, January 18 | 6:30 PM
Director: David Ray | Canada, 20116
101 minutes

Hello Destroyer

Friday, October 27 | 6:30 PM
Director: Kevan Funk | Canada, 2016 | 110 minutes

Jared Abrahamson (Fear the Walking Dead) plays a painfully shy but ruggedly capable enforcer on a minor-league hockey team who discovers the cutthroat nature of his locker-room "family," in the forceful first feature from Canadian director Kevan Funk.

Timely, uncompromising, and devastating, Kevan Funk’s Hello Destroyer raises deeply troubling questions about how we teach boys to become adults, particularly within the context of our national obsession: hockey. A new recruit on the minor league Prince George Warriors, Tyson Burr (TIFF 2016 Rising Star Jared Abrahamson) is an enforcer whose primary tasks are digging the puck out of corners and protecting more skilled players. He is painfully shy and inarticulate, the product of a world that values aggression over emotional development. Spurred on by his cliché-spewing coach, Tyson inadvertently injures another player and soon discovers that the "family" he has grown up in is a lot more self-serving and cutthroat than he thought. Few Canadian artists have had the courage to question our assumptions about Canada's game; fewer still have mounted such a forceful critique of an athletics system that forges young boys into weapons, then abandons them when they become inconvenient.

KONELĪNE: our land beautiful

Thursday, November 9 | 6:30 PM
Director: Nettie Wild | Canada, 2016 | 96 minutes 

Nettie Wild’s extraordinary KONELĪNE: our land beautiful takes us beyond the Lower Mainland to reveal the stunning landscape to the north, and to chart the tension between a still relatively pristine beauty and the scars that economic development inevitably brings in the form of resource extraction and power lines. What sets KONELĪNE: our land beautiful apart is that it seeks to find the poetry of everyone in front of the lens -  from diamond drillers to elders who protest against them.  (Also like Haida Gwaii KONELĪNE: our land beautiful  was awarded the Best Canadian Feature Documentary prize at HotDocs earlier this year.)

First and foremost a rhapsodic visual response to a place and the people in it, KONELĪNE: our land beautiful engages the senses with its ravishing aerial views and staggering vistas (as well as its superb, subtle sound design). On at least three separate occasions, Wild catches something thrillingly new and raw on camera, whether it’s a moose coming to a sticky end, horses being cajoled across a torrential river, or a power transmission tower being painstaking lowered into place by a massive helicopter. Then there’s the sequence when fish are airlifted up river for their own protection… And the scenes where a Tahltan First Nation discusses his efforts to learn his native tongue ("KONELĪNE" means "our land beautiful")… By no means a polemic,the film is instead a meditation on different cultures, different conceptions of time and value, and a glimpse of the something that will surely outlast us all.

Transcendent, breathtaking spectacle….she let the camera hunt for art in every frame, mining veins of abstract beauty rather than sharp nuggets of political narrative. She allows every image an ecumenical gaze. - Brian D. Johnson, Maclean’s

A feast for the eyes… [we are] in the hands of an expert story teller. KONELĪNE is a wise, humanistic documentary… a tone poem to a beautiful land and the amazing characters who live in it. I urge you to see it. - POV

Beautiful, complicated, compelling. - Chris Knight, National Post

Window Horses


Thursday, November 16 | 6:30 PM
Director: Ann Marie Fleming | Canada, 2016 | 89 minutes

Window Horses is an animated feature. It's about love (it's always about love…) - love of family, poetry, history, culture. Here's the story: Rosie Ming, a young Canadian poet, is invited to perform at a Poetry Festival in Shiraz, Iran, but she’d rather be in Paris. She lives at home with her over-protective Chinese grandparents and has never been anywhere by herself. Once in Iran, she finds herself in the company of poets and Persians, all who tell her stories that force her to confront her past; the Iranian father she assumed abandoned her and the nature of Poetry itself. It’s about building bridges between cultural and generational divides. It’s about being curious. Staying open. And finding your own voice through the magic of poetry.

Voiced by award-winning actress Sandra Oh (who also produced the film and championed it in its early stages), Rosie is a blank slate, largely unfamiliar with poetry other than her own, or the Iranian and Chinese cultures of her ancestors. An invitation to Iran transforms Rosie’s concept of the world and allows the film to depict the history and art of Iran in an organic and appealing way. - The Gambit

Grand Unified Theory

Thursday, January 18 | 6:30 PM
Director: David Ray | Canada, 20116 | 101 minutes

During one fateful weekend, the family of brilliant North Vancouver astrophysicist Albert (Scott Bellis) has a complete meltdown, setting in motion a raucous and hilarious series of events that mirror his radical theories of the behaviour of the universe.

Writer-director David Ray finesses an almost-too-cute premise into one of the most purely enjoyable and impressive local films in recent memory.

Astrophysicist Albert (Scott Bellis) is being courted by a prestigious New York university while his wife, Rita (Kendall Cross), is being courted by an ethically (and intellectually) impaired old flame (Andrew McNee—verging on comic genius). Their kids are dealing with the usual adolescent stuff: dorky Gordon (Max Haynes) probably shouldn’t have whacked off behind a neighbour’s hedge while he was peering through a bedroom window, and Lauren (Emma Grabinsky) is learning the hard way to never go pole-vaulting in anger.

The zingers come thick and fast in this David O. Russell–shaped exercise in synchronicity-drenched family angst, and everybody’s performance is absolutely on point, including North Vancouver’s. But this Theory really works because Ray obviously loves his characters and, sure enough, so do we.

One of the most purely enjoyable and impressive local films in recent memory. - Georgia Straight

Winner, Audience Choice Award - Most Popular Canadian Film, Whistler Film Festival 2016


Admission

FREE! Tickets available at the door the day of the screening; first come, first-seated.

Details

When: October 27, November 9 & 16, 2017 and January 18, 2018.

Where: Djavad Mowafaghian Cinema, Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 W. Hastings St.

Additional Info: Presented in partnership with Telefilm Canada and the Vancouver International Film Festival.

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