Please note:

To view the Fall 2017 Academic Calendar go to http://www.sfu.ca/students/calendar/2017/fall.html

Criminology Courses

CRIM 101 - Introduction to Criminology (3)

Topics will include: examination of different terms and concepts commonly used in criminology, such as crime, delinquency, deviance, criminal, victim, rehabilitation and treatment. Criminology as a body of knowledge and as a profession. Position and subject matter of criminology. Relationship between criminology and other academic disciplines. Specificity of criminology. Relationship between theory and practice. History and evolution of criminological thought. Elements of continuity and discontinuity between classical and modern theories of criminality. Levels of explanations in criminology. Practical applications of criminology. The foundations of a modern criminal policy. Breadth-Social Sciences.

CRIM 103 - Psychological Explanations of Criminal and Deviant Behavior (3)

An introduction to, and critical examination of, biogenetic, psychiatric, and psychological explanations of criminal and deviant behavior. Special attention will be given to the hypothesized links between criminality and genetics, physiology, the endocrine system, mental disorders, personality, moral development, and other forms of social learning. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and 102 are recommended. Breadth-Social Sciences.

CRIM 104 - Sociological Explanations of Criminal and Deviant Behavior (3)

A survey of some major sociological perspectives on crime and deviance that will include both mainstream and critical theories. These will include: anomie, neutralization, control, group conflict, sub-cultural, ecological, functionalist and critical theories. Critical analysis of the assumptions upon which each theory is based. Examination of the similarities and differences between/among the various explanations. Prerequisite: SA 150 is recommended. Breadth-Social Sciences.

CRIM 131 - Introduction to the Criminal Justice System - A Total System Approach (3)

Introductory analysis of the structure and operation of the Canadian criminal justice system. Examination of the patterns of crime and victimization; police operations, discretion and decision making; the criminal courts, including sentencing; the corrections system, including correctional institutions and community-based models; the youth justice system. Patterns of contact and conflict between various social groups and the criminal justice system. Breadth-Social Sciences.

CRIM 135 - Introduction to Canadian Law and Legal Institutions: A Criminal Justice Perspective (3)

A general introduction to the fundamental and competing principles of jurisprudence and to the basic legal institutions of Canada. Prepares students for those law and law related courses offered within the School of Criminology and will consider the history of Canadian law, the development of the Canadian constitution, the system of Canadian courts and the roles and responsibilities of members of the legal profession. In addition, the course will consider the nature of legal reasoning, the doctrine of precedent, principles of statutory interpretation and will also introduce the fields of contract, torts, administrative law, and family law. Also examines the process of law reform in Canada. Breadth-Social Sciences.

CRIM 161 - Practicum I (3)

First term of work experience in the Criminology Co-operative Education Program. Units from this course do not count towards the units required for an SFU degree. Prerequisite: 30 units (at least fifteen completed at Simon Fraser University) including CRIM 101, 220, 131, 135 and one of PSYC 210, STAT 101 or 203, with a cumulative grade point average of not less than 2.75. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator one term in advance.

CRIM 203 - Historical Reactions to Crime and Deviance (3)

Historical review of society's reaction to crime and deviance, relating this history to religious, political, social and philosophical movements and schools of thought. Consideration of the history and evolution of punishment and penal methods and the historical forces influencing the development, implementation, and modification of these methods. Prerequisite: Any 100 division CRIM course.

CRIM 205 - Crime Myths (3)

Misperceptions about crime and justice are commonly fostered by the media, politicians, and from overgeneralizations of personal experience. Much of what people believe about crime does not represent its true reality. This course will cover some common myths about crime and criminal justice, the consequences of these myths, and the value of rigorous research evidence in differentiating crime myths from facts. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 210 - Law, Youth and Young Offenders (3)

An analysis of the definition and control of youthful misconduct in an historical and contemporary context. Attention is focused upon: the social construction of 'juvenile delinquency', the decline of the concept, and the emergence of the concept of the 'young offender'; the Young Offenders Act and related legislation; the growth of the welfare state and the role of social workers in 'policing' youth and families; explanations for the criminal behavior of young persons; state and private sector programs designed to deal with such behavior. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and CRIM 131.

CRIM 213 - Women and Criminal Justice (3)

This course offers an historical and analytical overview of women and crime, taking into account the role of gender in both criminality and social responses to crime. Specific emphasis will be given to feminist theories. Attention will focus on the specific crimes and patterns of control and punishment. Prerequisite: Any 100 division CRIM course.

CRIM 218 - Introductory Special Topics in Criminology (3)

Introductory analysis of specific areas of criminology or criminal justice. Subjects covered will change from term to term depending on the specific interests of faculty, or students and current issues in criminology.

CRIM 220 - Research Methods in Criminology (3)

An introduction to criminological research that is intended to develop the student's research and analytical skills. Specifically, the course will focus on the theory of inquiry, the logic, and structure of criminological inquiry, research design, data gathering, analysis and reporting. Prerequisite: Any 100 division CRIM course is recommended. Students with credit for CRIM 120 may not take CRIM 220 for further credit. Quantitative.

CRIM 230 - Criminal Law (3)

Nature, purpose, scope, sources and basic principles of the criminal law. Study of certain fundamental legal concepts such as mens rea, negligence and strict liability. Analysis of the concept of criminal responsibility in Canada. Critical examination of the legislative policies expressed in the Criminal Code. Study of the basic elements of a criminal offence. Examination of the legal principles relating to certain specific crimes and to certain major defences. Impact of Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms on the criminal law. Prerequisite: CRIM 135.

CRIM 241 - Introduction to Corrections (3)

An examination of the organization, structure and operation of contemporary Canadian corrections. A consideration of the history and development of provincial and federal correctional systems. The role of sentencing in the correctional process and alternatives to confinement. Discussion of the social organization of correctional institutions, including the inmates, correctional officers, correctional treatment staff and administrators. Parole board decision making and the issues surrounding the re-entry of offenders into the community. Community-based corrections programs and outcomes. Prerequisite: CRIM 131.

CRIM 251 - Introduction to Policing (3)

An examination of the organization and operation of contemporary Canadian policing. Consideration of the history and development of policing in Canada, the role of the police in Canadian society and the police occupation, including recruitment and training. Discussion of police decision making and the exercise of discretion, police powers, and structures of accountability. Managing the police organization. Examination of police-community relations and crime prevention initiatives. Prerequisite: CRIM 131. Students with credit for CRIM 151 may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 261 - Practicum II (3)

Second term of work experience in the Criminology Co-operative Education Program. Units from this course do not count towards the units required for an SFU degree. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CRIM 161 and 45 units with a minimum CGPA of 2.75.

CRIM 300W - Current Theories and Perspectives in Criminology (3)

A detailed examination of current theories and perspectives in criminology. The content of the course will change with developments in the area. Students can expect to study biological, psychological and sociological theories and perspectives, as well as those from other relevant disciplines and fields of inquiry (e.g. geography, political science and cultural studies). Prerequisite: CRIM 101. Students with credit for CRIM 300 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

CRIM 301 - Crime in Contemporary Society (3)

Contemporary issues, problems and themes pertinent to the field of criminology. Development, character and function of criminology as an academic and professional discipline. Status of criminology in the Canadian context. Selected issues of the study of crime, law and justice which will vary depending on instructor. This course may not be taken by students who are majoring or minoring in Criminology. Breadth-Social Sciences.

CRIM 302 - Critical Approaches to Crime and Deviance (3)

Critique of traditional criminological theory and of the conventional approaches to the problems of crime and punishment. Critique of classical etiological criminology. Examination of the relationships between crime, class and power. The criminal as a scapegoat for the system. The stereotype of the criminal. Street crime vs. corporation and state crime. Criticism of treatment ideology and techniques. Comparison of conservative and radical criminal policy. The controversy about the possibility of a value-free social science and about the political commitment of the social scientist. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 310 - Young Offenders and Criminal Justice: Advanced Topics (3)

Examines some of the more complex contemporary issues relating to young offenders and justice. For any given term, the content of the course will reflect current controversies as well as faculty and student interests. Topics may include social control theory and juvenile justice; an assessment of theories of rehabilitation; the legal philosophy of the young offenders legislation and its impact on juvenile justice; and an evaluation of diversion, deinstitutionalization and de-legalization in Canada and the United States. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and CRIM 210.

CRIM 311 - Minorities and the Criminal Justice System (3)

An analysis of political, economic, and ethnic minorities and their relationship with the criminal justice system. Critical analysis of possible discordance, disharmony or conflict between ethnic and racial minorities such as Native Indians, Inuit, Metis, Doukhobor and others and the legal and social norms of the 'host' majority. Women and the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 312 - Criminological Perspectives on Social Problems (3)

Involves detailed study of forms of deviance that have been commonly defined as constituting 'social problems.' Consideration of drug abuse (alcohol, nicotine, heroin and others), suicide, prostitution, obscenity, gambling and abortion. Justifications for present legislative policy and the relationship between these activities and the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 313 - Specific Types of Crimes (3)

Critical analysis of a specific type of crime with particular emphasis on the nature, the incidence, correlates, control and prevention. Special attention may be given to white collar crime, computer crime, organized crime, violent crimes, political crimes, sexual offence, professional crimes, morality crime, etc. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 314 - Mental Disorder, Criminality and the Law (3)

Critical examination of the impact of psychiatry and related clinical professions on the criminal justice system. Relationship between institutions of mental health and legal control. The relevance of psychiatric theory and decision-making for the processing of mentally disordered offenders. The role of forensic clinicians in the courts, prisons, mental hospitals and related agencies. Specific issues addressed in this course will include psychiatric assessment, criminal responsibility, fitness to stand trial, prediction of dangerousness, treatment of mentally ill criminals and the penal and therapeutic commitment of the insane. Prerequisite: CRIM 101. Recommended: CRIM 131.

CRIM 315 - Restorative Justice (4)

The course will contrast restorative justice with the dominant adversarial/retributive/punitive model of justice through a critical analysis of these two paradigms of justice. Several key principles, assumptions, and concepts necessary for understanding the foundation and practice of restorative justice will be introduced and explored. Prerequisite: 45 units. Breadth-Social Sciences.

CRIM 316 - Sexual Offenders and Sexual Offences (3)

Provides an overview of current theoretical, clinical, and legal issues related to sexual offenders and sexual offences. For each of these issues, consideration will be given to different approaches and perspectives, and debates characterizing them. The topics to be covered include: explanatory models of sexual offending; developmental risk factors of sexual offending; typologies of sexual offenders; criminal careers of sexual offenders; phallometric assessment; actuarial and clinical risk assessment; treatment programs and their effectiveness, and criminal justice system initiatives. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and 103. Students with credit for CRIM 417 in Spring or Summer 2005 may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 317 - Sex, Work, and the Law (3)

Examines the history of commercial sex in Canada, the related laws and their impacts; research on the breadth of the commercial sex industry, sex sellers, sex buyers, and third parties; theories about commercial sex involvement and its role in society; legal approaches to addressing commercial sex in other countries; current legal framework, including jurisprudence, relevant Criminal, Immigration, and municipal law. Prerequisite: CRIM 101. Students with credit for CRIM 313 (Specific Types of Crime) prior to Summer 2007 may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 318 - Special Topics in Criminology (3)

A critical analysis of specific areas of criminology or criminal justice. The subjects covered will change from term to term depending on the specific interests of faculty, or students and current issues in criminology. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 319 - Special Topics in Criminology (3)

A critical analysis of specific areas of criminology or criminal justice. The subjects covered will change from term to term depending on the specific interests of faculty, or students and current issues in criminology. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 320 - Quantitative Research Methods in Criminology (3)

A detailed examination of the quantitative research methods and techniques most frequently used in criminological research. Advantages and shortcomings of each method and the appropriateness of each technique for criminological research. Problems of pure and applied research. Specific issues of interdisciplinary research. Critical evaluation of the quantitative methods used in certain major criminological studies. Prerequisite: CRIM 101; one of CRIM 120 or 220. CRIM 320 may be taken concurrently with CRIM 321. Quantitative.

CRIM 321 - Qualitative Research Methods in Criminology (3)

A detailed examination and application of qualitative research methods and techniques most frequently used in criminological research. Advantages and disadvantages of each method and the appropriateness of each technique for criminological research. Ethics of criminological research. Specific issues of interdisciplinary research. Critical evaluation of qualitative methods used in certain major criminological studies. Prerequisite: CRIM 101; one of CRIM 120 or 220. This course may be taken concurrently with CRIM 320.

CRIM 330 - Criminal Procedure and Evidence (3)

Critical examination of selected topics in criminal procedure and evidence, including jurisdiction, police powers of search and seizure, the right to counsel and pre-trial and trial procedures. Brief survey of the system of rules and standards by means of which the admissibility of evidence is determined. Close examination of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and its impact on criminal procedure and evidence. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and 230.

CRIM 331 - Advanced Criminal Law (3)

An extension of CRIM 230, this course will examine Canadian criminal law in greater depth as well as in comparison with other jurisdictions. Each term several substantive areas will be analysed closely. The areas to be examined will be determined by student interest but may include sexual offences, public order offences, mental disorder and the criminal process, property offences, etc. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and 230.

CRIM 332 - Sociology of Law (3)

Introduction to the theory of sociology of law. Law and social structure. Law as a product of a social system and as an instrument of social change. Social functions of the law. Relationship between law and the structure and function of various other social institutions. The process of law-making. Process by which various interests become translated into legal rules. The social reality of the law; the law in action. Social sciences findings into the operation and practice of the law. Critical and feminist perspectives on law. Public knowledge, awareness, opinions and attitudes to the law, sanctions and the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and 135.

CRIM 333 - Gender, Law and the State (3)

A consideration of the relationship of women and men to the State, law and society. Analysis of concepts such as patriarchal relations, criminalization, racism and sexuality, using feminist and masculinity theories. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and 135. Recommended: CRIM 213.

CRIM 334 - Law and Human Reproduction (3)

Overview of theoretical perspectives and available research on debates linked with human reproduction. Reconsideration of the effects of legislation, social policy and social change on contraception, birth, abortion, adoption, eugenics policies, new reproductive technologies, sexualities, and other topics. Historical and contemporary examples will be used. Feminist perspectives will be featured along with other approaches to human reproduction. Students with credit for CRIM 416, 417, 418 under the title Law and Reproduction, or GSWS 334 (or WS 334), may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 335 - Human Rights and Civil Liberties (3)

A study of the relationship between the government and the individual. Focus upon the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and its interpretation by the judiciary. Examination of the issues of equality before the law, freedom of speech, freedom of religion and freedom of expression. A study of human rights at the international, federal and provincial levels. Prerequisite: CRIM 330.

CRIM 336 - Corporate Crime and Corporate Regulation (3)

An examination and analysis of the nature, scope and impact of corporate crime, the principal organizational, social, political and economic factors involved in the definition and commission of such crime, and the ways in which governments and organizations respond to the problem. Particular types of corporate crime will be used as vehicles for exploring the legal and administrative framework that defines and regulates corporate wrongdoing. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and 135. Recommended: ECON 101.

CRIM 338 - Philosophy of Law (3)

Introduction to the philosophy of law. Concepts of law, constitution and sovereignty. The nature and sources of the law. Examination of natural law, legal positivism, Kelsen's pure theory of law, legal realism, modern normative and analytical theories, critical legal theory and feminist theory. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and 135.

CRIM 340 - Criminal Justice Policy Making and Policy Analysis (3)

Examines alternative approaches to developing and evaluating public policy in criminology through the use of case studies. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and 220. Students with credit for CRIM 415 under this topic may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 343 - Correctional Practice (3)

An in-depth consideration of a range of factors influencing contemporary correctional practice. The fundamental tension between the interests of offenders and the requirements of those managing correctional programs; the context provided by underlying theoretical assumptions about correctional practice and by influences such as public perceptions, politics and the economy. Prerequisite: CRIM 101. Recommended: CRIM 241.

CRIM 345 - Theoretical Perspectives on Punishment (3)

Examines theories of punishment in Western societies, with a particular emphasis on the 'revisionist' literature i.e. that which explains punishment techniques in terms of social-structural relationships rather than the rhetoric of reformers. The course also examines competing explanations of the demise of corporal punishment and the ascendence of incarceration at the end of the eighteenth and beginning of the nineteenth century, the advent of various kinds of 'community corrections' through the twentieth century, and changes in punishment and social control with the advent of 'risk society'. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 346 - Current Issues in Corrections (3)

In-depth critical assessment of contemporary issues faced by criminologists in relation to correctional operations and programming. Discusses current practices in corrections, including offenders' classification, criminological assessment, management of exceptional offenders and evidence-based programs offered to offenders. Prerequisite: CRIM 101. Recommended: CRIM 241.

CRIM 350 - Techniques of Crime Prevention I (3)

Techniques of mobilizing community resources for crime prevention. Organizing, implementing and managing citizen efforts to reduce crime. Recruiting citizen assistance, training requirements, establishing and operating citizen organizations, evaluating results. Organizing programs for reducing criminal opportunity, programs for education, employment and recreation. Operating youth services centres, residential programs, crisis intervention and emergency centres. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 351 - Police Accountability and Ethics (3)

Examines police accountability including the expected ethical conduct of police, police powers, police decision-making, the exercise of discretion, and the structure of accountability. Specific emphasis on police codes of ethics, core values of police agencies, the function of internal investigations, and the role of civilian review. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and 251.

CRIM 352 - Environmental Criminology: Theory and Practice (3)

Explores the history of the field of environmental criminology and critically examines the theoretical approaches within the field. Special emphasis is placed upon the relationship between crime, fear and the environment, the criminality of place and the decision processes involved in criminal events. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 355 - The Forensic Sciences (3)

Examines the use and interpretation of physical forensic evidence in court. It will critically examine and evaluate the major forensic sciences used in criminal investigations today, as well as look at the crime scene. Subjects examined will include forensic pathology, odontology, biology, DNA evidence, firearms evidence, toxicology chemistry and questioned documents. Techniques will be illustrated with case studies. Prerequisite: 45 units. Breadth-Social Sciences.

CRIM 356 - The Forensic Sciences II (3)

Introduces the methodological principles of analytical procedures and applications relevant to 21st century criminalistics as applied to skeletonized remains. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 357 - Forensic Anatomy (3)

An introduction to human anatomy and physiology relevant to the biological aspects of human forensics. Examines different body systems including form, function and development in the human adult and child, and discusses post mortem alteration to anatomical structures in the context of forensic anthropology and pathology. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 358 - Forensic Entomology (3)

Forensic entomology is the study of the insects associated with a dead body. This course will introduce students to entomology and its applications to law. Instruction will include lectures, tutorials and also laboratories where students will handle, dissect and identify a variety of insects. Prerequisite: CRIM 101. Recommended: CRIM 320 or equivalent. Students with credit for CRIM 318 (Introduction to Forensic Entomology or Forensic Entomology) prior to Fall 2017 may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 361 - Practicum III (3)

Third term of work experience in the Criminology Co-operative Education Program. Units from this course do not count towards the units required for an SFU degree. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CRIM 261 and 60 units with a minimum CGPA of 2.75.

CRIM 369 - Professional Ethics and Interpersonal Skills in Criminal Justice (4)

Immediate ethical issues confronting the professional in the criminal justice system are examined. Such concerns include privileged communications and confidentiality in fields and research situations; the conflict between the professional's duty to protect society and her/his duty to the client; ethics of decision-making; research ethics; situation ethics; professional ethical codes and legal constraints on professional conduct. Different modes of personal interaction in selected parts of the criminal justice system are examined and taught. Mixed problems of skill and ethics are explored in controlled laboratory settings. Prerequisite: CRIM 101; CGPA 2.67, 90 units completed; reserved for criminology majors and honors. Completion of this course does not guarantee admission to field practice.

CRIM 370 - Directed Readings (3)

Independent readings in a selected field of study, under the direction of a single faculty member. Papers will be required. Prerequisite: CRIM 320 and 330, and written application to the school no later than the last day of classes of the preceding term. CRIM 370 and 470 may not be taken concurrently.

CRIM 380 - Introduction to Cybercrime (3)

Explores legal, technical and social issues in cybercrime. Discusses the nature of cybercrime, with specific examples, and methods of regulation in Canada and worldwide. Addresses origins and extent of cybercrime, responses from the legal system and consideration of the wider effects for society. Prerequisite: CRIM 101. Students with credit for CRIM 318 under this topic (Fall 2009 or Spring 2010) may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 384 - Crime and Literature (3)

Questions of crime and criminal justice in novels and other forms of fiction are explored. Includes a critical discussion about crime plots, their social settings and outcomes, the psychology and sociology of criminal characters and their victims, and whether justice was achieved or denied in the course of the plot. Writing intensive. Students with credit for CRIM 416 or 417 or 418 as Crime and Literature, or ENGL 384 may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 402 - Biological Explanations of Crime (3)

Examines possible biological factors that could result in a predisposition towards criminal behavior. These include not only the genetic factors that affect behavior and therefore could potentially predispose towards crime, but also biochemical, neurological, nutritive and accidental effects such as head injuries. This course will look critically at all evidence both for and against any possible biological predispositions for criminogenic behaviors, together with the interaction with the environment. In particular, moral and ethical issues will be considered and debated. Prerequisite: CRIM 101. Students with credit for CRIM 416 in the summer 2000 or 2001 term may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 410 - Decision-making in Criminal Justice (3)

Examination of the factors which influence decision making in the criminal justice system. The exercise of discretion by criminal justice personnel; the role of organizational policies and priorities in decision making; the involvement of victims and the public. Consideration of decision making at specific stages of the criminal justice process. Prerequisite: CRIM 131.

CRIM 413 - Terrorism (3)

Considers the nature, extent, and basis of terrorism as an official crime throughout the world and its impact upon criminal justice systems. Theoretical explanations in a comparative perspective will be employed to examine the impact of terrorism on various countries and the response of governments to it. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 414 - Special Topics in Criminology (3)

A critical analysis of specific areas of criminology or criminal justice. The subjects covered will change from term to term depending on the specific interests of faculty, or students and current issues in criminology. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 415 - Special Topics in Criminology (3)

A critical analysis of specific areas of criminology or criminal justice. The subjects covered will change from term to term depending on the specific interests of faculty, or students and current issues in criminology. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 416 - Current Issues in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3)

A critical analysis of certain 'hot' issues in criminology and criminal justice. The topics covered change from term to term. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 417 - Current Issues in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3)

A critical analysis of certain 'hot' issues in criminology and criminal justice. The topics covered change from term to term. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 418 - Current Issues in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3)

A critical analysis of certain 'hot' issues in criminology and criminal justice. The topics covered change from term to term. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 419 - Aboriginal/Indigenous Justice (3)

An in-depth examination of Aboriginal/indigenous conceptions of justice in dealing with crime and other trouble in indigenous communities, and in relations among peoples. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 or FNST 101 or 201 or permission of the instructor. Students with credit for this course as CRIM 416 or 418, or FNST 419, may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 429 - Indigenous Peoples and International Law (3)

An examination of how relations between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples framed and were framed by the development of international law from the 15th century onward. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 or FNST 101 or 201 or permission of instructor. Students with credit for CRIM 416, or 418 under the title "Indigenous Peoples and International Law" or "Indigenous Peoples and Evolving International Relations", or FNST 429 may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 431 - Comparative Criminal Justice Systems (3)

Critical examination of the theory and method of comparative criminal justice. Review of common law systems, civic law systems, and socialist law systems. Specific consideration of the development, structure and operation of the criminal justice systems in selected countries, which may include England, France, Federal Republic of Germany, the former Soviet Union, the People’s Republic of China, and Japan. Focus on the impact of historical, social, political, religious and cultural factors on the criminal justice process. Consideration, of the structure and operation of various components of the criminal justice process in selected countries, including the police, criminal courts, and corrections. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 432 - Gender in the Courts and the Legal Profession (3)

The gendered nature of law will be addressed through an examination of its underlying factual assumptions, and the use of social science research as evidence in equality litigation. The use of the charter, human rights legislation, and other legal means to achieve gender equality through the legal system in the areas of work, employment and pay equity, and compensatory schemes for personal injuries will also be examined. This course will also examine women's struggles to gain admittance to the legal profession, and the barriers which may still prevent them from participating equally in the profession today. Prerequisite: CRIM 330.

CRIM 433 - Communities and Crime (3)

Examines communities and neighborhoods as contexts for thinking about a wide range of criminological issues including crime, fear, victimization, policing, and policy. Theoretical explanations and applied research will be used to explore how and why "community" is important for understanding crime and criminal justice. Prerequisite: CRIM 101. Students with credit for this course as CRIM 418 may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 436 - Corporate Crime and Corporate Regulation: Advanced Topics (3)

A detailed examination and analysis of particular types of corporate wrongdoing and the nature and impact of the relevant legal and administrative framework. The topics will be selected by the particular course instructor and will, therefore, vary according to the instructor's interests as well as topicality. The areas of corporate crime which are chosen may include one or more of the following: 'economic crimes' such as violations of statutes which regulate competition, protect intellectual property, and safeguard stock market investors; crimes against the environment such as air and water pollution; and, crimes against consumers including the marketing of hazardous products, contaminated food, or dangerous drugs and devices. Prerequisite: CRIM 101. Recommended: CRIM 336.

CRIM 437 - Crime and Misconduct in the Professions (3)

Examines the use of self regulation by professional organizations (e.g. law societies, colleges of physicians and surgeons) and the increasing demand by other occupational groups and social and economic entities to be governed by these internal controls in addition to, or in lieu of, the criminal and other state law. It will specifically examine how the criminal law is used in the context of self-regulation and how professionals can bypass the criminal law through self-regulating organizations. The professions will be examined in the context of administrative, civil and criminal law. Implications for self regulation in other areas and the future of self-regulation will also be considered. Prerequisite: Recommended: CRIM 330.

CRIM 438 - Wrongful Convictions and Other Miscarriages of Justice (3)

Examines the issues of wrongful convictions and other miscarriages of justice. Considers the major factors that contribute to wrongful convictions despite the safeguards built into the system, and ways to prevent or reduce their number. Prerequisite: CRIM 330 is recommended. Students with credit for CRIM 417 under this title (Fall 2007 or Fall 2008) may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 440 - Correctional Administration and Planning (3)

Theory and practice of organization and administration of correctional agencies. Particular attention is given to the political/bureaucratic interface in correctional administration, management styles, labour relations, management support systems and program planning. Identification and assessment of corrections management objectives. The relationship between corrections administration and other components of the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CRIM 101, 131 and 241. Recommended: POL 251.

CRIM 441 - Preventing Crime and Antisocial Behaviour: Designing & Evaluating Programs (3)

An applied course in which students will learn to design and evaluate evidence-based programs targeting the prevention or reduction of specific criminal and antisocial behaviours. Examples of programs include those targeting: gangs; drug use; bullying; aggression; school drop-out; child sexual abuse; domestic violence; online piracy, and gambling addiction. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and CRIM 220. Students who took CRIM 417 Current Issues in Criminology and Criminal Justice Preventing Crime & Antisocial Behaviour in Fall 2013 may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 442 - Restorative Justice Practice: Advanced Topics (3)

An in-depth examination of the various community-based and institutional practices in promoting restorative processes, based on an examination and comparison of the values, philosophical approaches and outcomes of selected western and non-western models. Practices examined will include a range of restorative justice initiatives, including victim-offender mediation, family-group conferencing, multi-party mediation, and various circle remedies. This examination will include the application of restorative justice in the community, in schools and at all levels of the legal process (pre-arrest to post-incarceration and reintegration). Prerequisite: CRIM 315. Recommended: CRIM 343.

CRIM 449 - Major Crime and Forensic Analysis for Law Enforcement (3)

Provides an introduction to crime and intelligence analysis techniques used by law enforcement Lab exercises will include hands-on exposure to ESR1 ArcMap 10 (GIS analysis) and IBM 12 Analyst Notebook (network analysis) tools used by law enforcement. Topics will include: the taxonomy of structured analytic methods; analysis of competing hypotheses; decomposition and visualization; and a detailed examination of the intelligence process. Will also cover the theoretical foundations of crime analysis and crime mapping, with a focus on the effectiveness of police in reducing crime through analytic driven initiatives. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and CRIM 135. Students who took CRIM 417 Introduction To Crime And Intelligence Analysis: Theory & Practice in Spring 2013, Fall 2013 or Spring 2014 cannot receive further credit for this course.

CRIM 450 - Techniques of Crime Prevention II (5)

Introduction to the modern techniques of crime prevention. Emphasis will be on crime prevention and reduction in fear of crime. Crime prevention through social change. Crime prevention through environmental design. Crime prevention through physical planning and architectural design. The concept of 'defensible space.' Obstructing and reducing the opportunities for the commission of crimes. Evaluating crime prevention programs. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 451 - Advanced Techniques in Forensic Science (3)

Looks at the advanced and sometimes more controversial areas of forensic science used in the criminal justice system today. Most areas are those outside the crime lab and require extensive and in-depth training in a very focused field. Seminars may cover areas such as the use of polygraph, blood spatter pattern analysis, entomology, pathology, odontology, anthropology, genocide investigation, facial approximation, crime scene analysis on land, underwater and mass homicide scenarios. Prerequisite: CRIM 101. Recommended: CRIM 355. Students with credit for CRIM 420 in 01-3, 00-3, 99-3, 98-3 or 97-3 may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 452 - Skeletal Pathology and Criminalistics (3)

The examination of disease processes which affect and reveal themselves in the human skeleton at the level of surface morphology, radiology and histology and other relevant analytical methodologies relevant to criminalistics and human identification. Prerequisite: CRIM 101. Recommended: CRIM 357. Students who have taken this course as CRIM 417 may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 453 - Policing Illegal Drug Markets (3)

Provides an overview of the theoretical, analytical, and ethical issues related to drug law enforcement. Examines the strategies used by the police in responding to the challenges posed by illegal drug markets. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 454 - Criminal Profiling (3)

Provides an overview of the advanced issues relating to the scientific study, development and evaluation of criminal profiling. Outlines the criminological and psychological principles upon which criminal profiling is based, including classification of violent behaviour, behavioural change and consistency. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 455 - Advanced Issues in Policing (3)

Covers the major issues surrounding policing in the 21st century. Topics will vary semester to semester and may include policing gangs; police social disorder; sustainable policing; the police in the global community; quality assurance in policing; policing multi-needs populations; and the delivery of police services in remote and rural communities. Focus on police strategies and the effectiveness of specific policies and interventions designed to address these changes. Prerequisite: CRIM 101, 131 and 251.

CRIM 456 - Investigative Psychology in Policing (3)

Advanced issues relating to the empirical and scientific study of investigative psychology in policing. Outlines the main applications of investigative psychology, including police interrogation techniques, confession, false allegation, lie detection, crisis negotiation, risks and threats assessment, and psychological autopsies. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 457 - Crime and Criminal Intelligence Analysis (4)

Examines data handling, data quality and analysis of various criminal justice system information sources common to police services, government agencies and academic researchers. Develops skills in tactical, strategic and administrative crime analysis functionality. Prerequisite: CRIM 352 is recommended. Students who have taken CRIM 418 under this topic may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 458 - Community Policing (3)

Examines the theory and models of contemporary community policing in Canada. Explores crime prevention, crime response, problem-oriented policing, the definition of community, and the role and responsibility of the community. Prerequisite: CRIM 251.

CRIM 459 - Organized Crime (3)

Examines the many forms of organized crime, including theories and models. Explores specific activities involving organized criminals, traditional organized crime, street gangs and motorcycle gangs, and criminal justice responses to organized crime. Prerequisite: CRIM 101. Students with credit for CRIM 416 in Spring 2009 or CRIM 313 in Fall 2009 may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 461 - Practicum IV (3)

Fourth term of work experience in the Criminology Co-operative Education Program. Units from this course do not count towards the units required for an SFU degree. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CRIM 361 and 75 units with a minimum CGPA of 2.75.

CRIM 462 - Field Practice (15)

Supervised three month field practicum in selected criminal justice agencies. Students are required to complete a series of reports addressing theoretical and practical issues relating to their placement as well as to attend regular feedback seminar discussions with faculty supervisors and other field practicum students. Prerequisite: Prior approval of the school and a minimum CGPA of 2.5 is required. Applicants must be formal criminology majors or honors students, and must be enrolled in or have completed CRIM 320, 321 and 369. In extraordinary circumstances, students may be accepted with CRIM 320 or CRIM 321, with the approval of the field practice co-ordinator. A minimum grade of B- in CRIM 369 is required. Only under exceptional circumstances, to a limit of three units, and with the formal written approval of the director of the undergraduate program, will enrolment for course work in addition to CRIM 462 be permitted.

CRIM 464 - Street Gang Patterns and Policies (3)

Introduces the theoretical, empirical, and policy issues surrounding street gangs. The state of the current gang problem in Canada, the sociodemographics and motivations of individuals who join gangs the effect of gang membership on delinquency, the nature of violence and victimization, and the challenges of desistance will be discussed. Concludes with an overview of gang control strategies and the available policies. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 465 - Crime, Economics, and the Economy (3)

Considers the study of crime from an economic perspective and the relationship between crime and the economy. Theoretical frameworks and empirical examples from both economic and criminology will be discussed. Prerequisite: CRIM 101. Students with credit for CRIM 414, 415, 416, 417 or 418 under this topic may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 470 - Directed Studies (5)

Independent research in a selected criminological area, under the direction and supervision of at least one faculty member. A research report is required. Written application to the school no later than the last day of classes of the preceding term. Reserved for criminology honors and majors. Prerequisite: CRIM 320, 321 and 330. Recommended: CRIM 370.

CRIM 480 - Computer Forensics and Cybercrime (3)

Advanced exploration of high-tech crime and exploration of the tools and techniques used by cyber-criminals. Examines the techniques used by law enforcement to investigate and prosecute offenders, as well as the probable future development of cybercrime. Prerequisite: CRlM 380. Students who have taken CRIM 416/417/418 under the topic in Spring 2010 may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 481 - Advanced Issues in Cybercrime (3)

Analysis of complex, emerging and current cyber-security threats. Discusses methods used to identify cybercrime threats and vulnerabilities, as well as the social, economic and legal implications. Insight into creating an effective defensive plan, and an understanding of future security trends and threats which are likely to develop. Prerequisite: CRIM 380. Students who have taken CRIM 416/417/418 under this topic in Spring 2010 may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 490 - Honours Thesis I (3)

An in-depth investigation of a selected topic in criminology, including a comprehensive review of the literature as well as initial and partial completion of the thesis research. Open only to students who have been admitted to the criminology honours program. Prerequisite: Open only to students who have been admitted to the Criminology Honours Program.

CRIM 491 - Current Theory and Research in Criminology: Advanced Topics (4)

A detailed and comprehensive examination of the dominant theoretical research programs currently found in criminology. The subject matter of the seminars may change from year to year according to topicality and may include the following: biological theory and research; social psychological research programs (e.g., social learning theory); environmental criminology; left realism; feminism; post structuralism and post modernism. Students are also required to attend a weekly pro-seminar. Prerequisite: Open only to students who have been admitted to the Criminology Honours Program.

CRIM 499 - Honours Thesis II (9)

An honours thesis is a research report written under the supervision of a faculty member, a copy of which is to be permanently lodged in the School of Criminology. Students are required to attend a weekly seminar at which various issues associated with the linking of theory and method are examined and where students can both discuss their progress and share their research experiences. On completion, the thesis is to be orally defended in a school seminar. Open only to students who have been admitted to the criminology honours program. Students are not permitted to take other courses while enrolled in this course. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of B in CRIM 490 and 491 is required.

CRIM 710 - Current Issues in Terrorism (3)

The dynamic nature of terrorism creates multiple issues around understanding the threat environment, the perpetrators, causes, and solutions. As an advanced introduction to contemporary terrorism, specific emphasis will be placed on understanding: the specific threat environment (e.g. right wing terrorism, Islamic fundamentalism); emergent issues (e.g. homegrown terrorism, foreign fighters, lone wolves, women in terrorism); particularly salient issues (e.g. cyberterrorism, weapons of mass destruction); the dynamics of terrorism (radicalization, social media, social networks). These issues are all addressed in the context how they relate to, and can inform, methods of preventing and responding to terrorism. Themes and specific topics will be updated every year to reflect the dynamic nature of contemporary terrorism.

CRIM 711 - Radicalization and Recruitment to Terrorism (3)

Among the most important questions for terrorism studies are “Why and how do individuals become involved in terrorism?” The mechanisms of radicalization and recruitment are varied and diverse, and may be influenced by the interplay of psychology, social psychology, group dynamics, and broader cultural contexts. This course will provide an introduction to the wide variety of perspectives. Regardless of the specific motivational dynamics, contemporary theorizing conceptualizes radicalization as a process. This course will review these approaches. Finally this course will examine the policy implications of the various approaches to radicalization. How can what we know about radicalization be used to arrest or reverse the process?

CRIM 720 - Fundamentals of Security Risk Management (3)

This course introduces students to the basics of risk management, which includes both risk assessment and risk treatment. Risk management will be approached from a broad perspective, and terrorism will be considered as one possible context for the application of risk management principles. Students will gain an appreciation of a wide variety of risk assessment methodologies, and learn how to evaluate these methodologies in varying contexts. This course will also highlight other important aspects of the risk management process, including understanding organizational risk culture, risk communications, risk monitoring, and reporting to governance.

CRIM 721 - Psychological Assessment of Risk for Terrorism and Group-Based Violence (3)

Reviews psychological theory, research, and practice as it relates to assessment of risk for terrorism and other forms of group-based violence. The overarching goal is to help students develop the knowledge and skills necessary to conduct evidence-based assessments of group-based violence, as well as to critically evaluate, interpret, and act on assessments conducted by others.

CRIM 730 - Terrorism and Civil Liberties: Canadian, Comparative and International Perspectives (3)

This course addresses the tensions between individual rights and national security. It attempts to address how democracies attempt to balance civil liberties against concerns raised by global terrorism. Various legal responses to terrorism are analyzed in the domestic, comparative and international contexts.

CRIM 731 - Policy Making and Decision Analysis in Counter-Terrorism and Security Studies (3)

Decisions involve trade-offs among optimal rationality, legal and political acceptability, and managerial and operational feasibility. The incomplete, ambiguous, and at times contradictory nature of information forms a growing challenge given the often fluid developments of threats in this policy area. The values and interests at stake for the decision maker constitute a second layer of challenge as threats blend between domestic and international and values compete among security and democratic liberty. The cognitive, small-group, and diverse organizational environments that manage these layers of challenge are themselves subject to bias and competition and may add potential distortions at both the policy and implementation levels. Impediments to optimal decision making include insufficient range of alternatives considered, false consensus, selection bias, rigid option selection, outdated standard operation procedures, conflation of parochial and policy goals, analogical reasoning, wishful thinking, bureaucratic rivalry, and low-probed choice.

CRIM 740 - Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods and Statistical Modeling (3)

CRIM 740 is an introductory course designed to familiarize students with the fundamentals of quantitative analysis. Students will become familiar with the basic quantitative approaches that are used in social science research, with an emphasis on analysis and interpretation. Students will hand-in assignments based on a dataset that will be supplied by the professor. In this course, students will be expected to apply a variety of analytic techniques. Lab periods will be devoted primarily to learning to code, analyze, interpret and represent data using SPSS.

CRIM 742 - Cybersecurity (3)

The cyber domain is a new environment where we see both security threats and terrorist activities taking place. Indeed, addressing these threats through the lens cyber security will be of utmost importance. This course will introduce students to online communities of extremists and hackers, on both web-forums and social media, where threats/attacks against Canada, Canadians, and critical infrastructure are discussed. This course will also introduce methods for analyzing data from online communities, in particular text data and social network data. This course is for social science students and as such does not require a background in computing science.

CRIM 798 - MA Project (Research Report) (6)

Taken during the final semester of study, the Master’s Project (Research Report) is required for graduation. The PRP is an extended essay conducted under the auspices of a cohort supervisor. Students are expected to conduct a comprehensive and critical review of pertinent literature. The Project is reviewed by two readers, who will provide feedback as well as a final grade. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 24 credit hours in TRSS program.

CRIM 800 - Criminological Theory I (3)

Intensive exposure to the major streams of criminological theory, the role of theory, and how theory develops, evolves, and changes. Consideration will be given to the relationship between criminological theories, their testable hypotheses and empirical support, as well as the interplay of theory and practice. Students enrolling in this course are expected to have a solid background in undergraduate criminological theory. Equivalent to CRIM 300W.

CRIM 801 - Criminological Theory II (3)

Advanced topics in criminological theory. Topics for in-depth analysis will be selected according to the availability and interest in specific course instructors. The course will emphasize theoretical construction and development, the importance of theory, and how it structure criminological thought. Prerequisite: CRIM 800, or permission of the instructor.

CRIM 810 - Spatial-temporal criminology (3)

An examination of research on crime that considers spatial and temporal dimensions. Subject matter will vary according to instructor interests and specialization. Specific areas of concentration may include: environmental criminology, communities and crime, neighborhoods and crime, ecology of crimes, and crime prevention.

CRIM 811 - Young Offenders (3)

An examination of contemporary issues in the context of young offenders and justice. Subject matter will vary according to instructor interest and specialization. Specific areas of concentration may include: social control theory and developmental life course theories and juvenile justice models; young offender legislation in Canada; neuropsychology and young offenders; serious and violent young offenders; and the assessment of theories of rehabilitation.

CRIM 812 - Criminal Networks (3)

Examines the social environment of offenders through a criminal network perspective. Emphasizes how analyzing delinquency through the lens of networks can make theoretical and empirical contributions to the field.

CRIM 813 - Policing (3)

An examination of contemporary issues and perspectives in modern policing. Subject matter will vary according to instructor interests and specialization. Specific areas of concentration may include: policing in a diverse society, policing in a democratic society, rural and remote policing, police leadership in a time of change, and the evaluation of policing strategies and training.

CRIM 814 - Restorative Justice (3)

A course on praxis: the marriage of practice and theory, and practice in the development and implementation of restorative (transformative) justice models. Topics include: the needs and experiences of victims, offenders, and communities (including the impact of individuals and intergenerational trauma); the role of the state in justice matters; a comparison of the foundational values, laws, philosophical approaches and outcomes of traditional justice models. An exploration of these models allowing the consideration of their potential for producing democratic justice within the state and community, particularly in the aftermath of crime and violent political aggression and weigh that potential against their potential peril and pitfalls.

CRIM 815 - Cybercrime (3)

An examination of complex, emerging, and current cybercrime threats for social science students. Subject matter will vary according to instructor interests and specialization. Specific areas of concentration may include: methods of identifying cybercrime threats and vulnerabilities, social, economic, and legal implications, cybercrime prevention, and the future of cybercrime trends and threats.

CRIM 816 - Terrorism (3)

An examination of the nature, extent, and bases of terrorism. Subject matter will vary according to instructor interests and specialization. Specific areas of concentration may include: the history of terrorism, theoretical explanations for terrorism, government responses to terrorism, and the impact of terrorism.

CRIM 817 - Corrections (3)

A critical examination of contemporary issues in corrections. Subject matter will vary according to instructor interests and specialization. Specific areas of concentration may include: correctional administration, program planning, the identification, assessment, and evaluation of correctional practices and how this impacts different correctional populations and the relationship between corrections and other components of the criminal justice system.

CRIM 818 - Contemporary Issues in Forensic Science (3)

Forensic science has been defined as the application of science to the law. An examination of what forensic science is from a theoretical, legal and scientific standpoint and how it is being shaped by the differing agencies involved in delivering it. The course itself is aimed at the non-scientist.

CRIM 820 - Criminal Justice Policy Analysis (3)

An introduction to policy analysis in the field of criminal justice, beginning with frames of reference for policy-making such as the market, welfare economics, equity, efficiency, and liberty. Through applied examples, students will define policy problems, identify goals and objectives, devise alternative solutions, predict the effects of these alternatives, and communicate advice to decision-makers.

CRIM 830 - Crime, Law, and Policy (3)

An examination of the intersection of crime, law, and policy. Subject matter will vary according to instructor interests and specialization. Specific areas of concentration may include: mental health, law and the environment, white collar crime, drug law, law and gender, the impacts of the law, legal considerations of policy, and the utility of legal interventions.

CRIM 831 - Sexual Violence (3)

An examination of theoretical, clinical, legal, and empirical issues related to sexual violence. Subject matter will vary according to instructor interests and specialization. Specific areas of concentration may include: theoretical models, developmental risk factors, and typologies of sexual violence, criminal careers of sexual offenders, actuarial and clinical risk assessment, treatment programs for sexual offenders, and criminal justice responses.

CRIM 860 - Research Methods I: Research Design (3)

Research design for criminological problems and foundational techniques for the conduct of research in criminology. The further development of fundamental research skills to be applied in research, including subsequent research methods courses and in the preparation of theses and dissertations. Students enrolling in this course are expected to have a solid background in undergraduate research methods, equivalent to CRIM 220.

CRIM 861 - Research Methods II: Quantitative Methods (3)

The coverage of a range of statistical techniques, including linear regression, logistic regression, and data reduction techniques such as cluster and factor analysis. The purposes, assumptions, and conduct of such analyses using a statistical software package for social sciences (e.g. SPSS, Stata, R) will be covered. Attention will be given to the decisions involved in data exploration and preparation for statistical modeling purposes. Students enrolling in this course are expected to have a solid background in undergraduate quantitative research methods, equivalent to CRIM 320.

CRIM 862 - Research Methods III: Qualitative Methods (3)

A range of research techniques generally subsumed under the rubric of qualitative research including field research, interview techniques, historical and legal research, and documentary analysis. Emphasis will be on the logic underlying such inquiry, the advantages and limitations associated with different sources of information and procedures, and the processes by which analytical rigor is achieved. Students enrolling in this course are expected to have a solid background in undergraduate qualitative research methods, equivalent to CRIM 321.

CRIM 863 - Research Methods IV: Advanced Quantitative Methods (3)

A survey of advanced statistical techniques in criminological research. Specific topics may include: limited (e.g., categorical, ordinal, and count) dependent variables, multi-level modeling, longitudinal data techniques, spatial data analysis, missing values analysis, and propensity score matching. Attention will be given to the decisions involved in data exploration and preparation for statistical modeling purposes using the appropriate statistical software. There is an emphasis on conceptual foundations and application. A strong background in regression-based techniques is assumed. Prerequisite: CRIM 861, or permission of the instructor.

CRIM 864 - Research Methods V: Advanced Qualitative Methods (3)

Advanced topics, issues and techniques in qualitative research methods in criminological and socio-legal research. Subject matter will vary according to instructor interests and specialization. Specific areas of concentration may include: field research; participatory action research; qualitative research and the digital revolution; research ethics; historical methods. Prerequisite: CRIM 862, or permission of the instructor.

CRIM 865 - Research Methods VI: The Theory and Practice of Program Evaluation (3)

Topics, issues and techniques in program evaluation within criminological research. The specific subject matter will vary according to instructor interests and specialization. Specific areas of concentration may include: needs assessment, program theory, logic models, process evaluation design and implementation, outcome evaluation design and implementation, and cost-benefit analysis. Prerequisite: CRIM 860 and CRIM 861, or permission of instructor.

CRIM 870 - Directed Readings (3)

Intensive readings under the supervision of a faculty member, in areas of interest related to the student's program.

CRIM 871 - Selected Topics (3)

Concentrated studies in areas of student specialization.

CRIM 872 - Selected Topics (3)

Concentrated studies in areas of student specialization.

CRIM 873 - Selected Topics (3)

Concentrated studies in areas of student specialization.

CRIM 880 - Field Practicum (3)

A term of full-time advanced and intensive practicum experience supervised by selected faculty and justice system personnel. Students will assume a large measure of responsibility and participate in a range of activities related to the placement.

CRIM 885 - Master's Project (6)

MA by coursework, project and practicum paper.

CRIM 897 - Comprehensive Exam (6)

A one term course that will allow students to complete the comprehensive exam process. Prerequisite: Completion of all course work within the PhD program.

CRIM 898 - MA Thesis (12)

CRIM 899 - PhD Thesis (6)