Please note:

To view the Fall 2017 Academic Calendar go to http://www.sfu.ca/students/calendar/2017/fall.html

Gerontology Courses

GERO 101 - Aging and Society (3)

Introduces the social, psychological, and physical dimensions of aging. Largely based on the Canadian context, but will also include international research and knowledge. Students who have taken GERO 300 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

GERO 300 - Introduction to Gerontology (3)

Examination of the aging process from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Physical and health factors in aging, economic and vocational factors in aging, family and community relations of older people, social policy and politics of aging. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on normal aging. Prerequisite: 60 units. Students who have taken GERO 101 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

GERO 301 - Research Methods in Gerontology (3)

This course examines research methodology applied to the field of gerontology. Key areas covered include: operationalizing gerontological concepts; sampling older populations; longitudinal designs; outcome and process evaluation of seniors' programs; and elementary data analyses. Prerequisite: 60 units.

GERO 302 - Health Promotion and Aging (3)

This course includes an examination of the development of contemporary understanding and practice of health promotion. Students will be given the opportunity to explore theories and models designed to explain health related behaviors and the determinants of health. Strategies for behavioral change and development of socio-environmental approaches will be discussed in the context of an aging Canadian population. Prerequisite: 60 units. Recommended: GERO 300.

GERO 401 - Environment and Aging (3)

Impact of the macro- and microenvironment as it affects the aged. Discussion of planned housing and institutional living arrangements, territoriality and the need for privacy, home range and use of space, urban planning, responsive design of housing and care facilities, effects of relocation and institutionalization. Prerequisite: 60 units. Recommended: GERO 300.

GERO 403 - Counselling Issues with Older Adults (3)

An examination of the ways of adapting counselling theory and practice to meet the needs of older adults and their families. Emphasis will be placed on counselling techniques and outcomes appropriate to the needs of persons living independently, with their families, or in institutional settings. Prerequisite: GERO 300 and PSYC 357 or GERO 420.

GERO 404 - Health and Illness in Later Life (3)

An examination of issues related to health and illness among older adults, drawing upon theories and concepts from biological, social and public health sciences. An introduction to assessment and intervention skills useful to persons working with older adults in a broad range of practice settings. Prerequisite: 60 units, GERO 300.

GERO 406 - Death and Dying (3)

The focus of this course is to provide the student with an in-depth understanding of the process of dying. By examining the process of dying, one's personal response to death as well as society's reaction and responsibilities toward dying, the student will gain new insights in caring for the dying person. Prerequisite: 60 units. Recommended: GERO 300.

GERO 407 - Nutrition and Aging (3)

This course examines specific nutritional conditions and concerns of the aging population. It does so by exploring the nutrient needs of the elderly as determined by physiological changes of aging, metabolic effects of common diseases, and biochemical interactions of medications. The course includes a broad investigation of the psychological, sociological, and physical factors which influence food choice and ultimately nutritional status in aging. Prerequisite: 60 units and GERO 300 or KIN 110.

GERO 408 - Families over the Life Course (4)

This course entails a comprehensive interdisciplinary study of families and aging. In addition to providing an overview of theory and research on this topic, a variety of substantive issues will be critically examined, including: families in mid life, sibling relationships, divorce and remarriage, dating in later life, care giving, poverty, elder abuse, and policy development. Prerequisite: 60 units. Recommended: GERO 300.

GERO 409 - Mental Health and Aging (3)

Psychopathology often presents in distinct ways among older adults. The intent of this course is to examine disorders with their onset in later life and those that extend into later years. Students will derive an understanding of the diagnostic criteria for various disorders, prevalence, theories of etiology, and selected empirically validated interventions. Prerequisite: GERO 300. Recommended: GERO 403, PSYC 241. Students with credit for GERO 411, when the course was offered under this title, may not take this course for further credit.

GERO 410 - Special Topics in Gerontology I (3)

Selected psychological, sociological, economic, biological and practical aspects of the aging of individuals and populations. Prerequisite: 60 units. Recommended: GERO 300.

GERO 411 - Special Topics in Gerontology II (3)

Selected psychological, sociological, economic, biological and practical aspects of the aging of individuals and populations. Prerequisite: 60 units. Recommended: GERO 300.

GERO 412 - Special Topics in Gerontology III (3)

Selected psychological, sociological, economic, biological and practical aspects of the aging of individuals and populations. Prerequisite: 60 units. Recommended: GERO 300.

GERO 413 - Sexuality and Aging (3)

Focuses on all aspects of sex and aging and the issues that arise around sexual behavior as we age. An interdisciplinary perspective, taking into account the physiological, psychological, interpersonal and social influences which shape our understanding of sexuality in the aged. Prerequisite: Recommended: GERO 101 or 300. Students who have completed this topic under GERO 410 may not complete this course for further credit.

GERO 420 - Sociology of Aging (4)

The structural and behavioral implications of aging. Topics include demographic aspects of aging; the relationship of aging to political, economic, familial and other social institutions; the psychological significance of aging. Prerequisite: 60 units. Recommended: GERO 300. Students with credit for SA 420 and students may not take this course for further credit.

GERO 450 - Evaluation of Health Programs for Older Adults (4)

How to design, implement and evaluate health and social programs and services for older adults. Divergent theoretical and methodological perspectives including process and impact evaluation methods will be covered. Prerequisite: 60 units. GERO 301 or PSYC 201 or SA 255 or HSCI 307. Recommended: GERO 101 or 300. Students must successfully complete a Criminal Record Check.

GERO 801 - Health Policy and Applied Issues in Gerontology (4)

Employing a broad concept of health, the aim of this course is to critically analyze both the Canadian health delivery system as it pertains to seniors, and a number of social programs and policies affecting seniors health. This will entail examining linkages between Long Term Care (LTC) and other service sectors as well as comparing programs and services across community, provincial and national boundaries. The course will also address ways in which a wide range of system and individual factors, from population aging, changing demographic and client characteristics to organizational arrangements and provincial and federal regulations, impinge on the roles and responsibilities of the program planner, administrator and environmental designer.

GERO 802 - Development and Evaluation of Health Promotion Programs for the Elderly (4)

This course deals with the design, implementation and evaluation of health promotion programs and services for older persons. Students will participate in the development and critical analysis of a variety of health initiatives aimed at healthful aging.

GERO 803 - Analytical Techniques for Gerontological Research (4)

This course has been specifically designed to provide training in quantitative data analysis using SPSSx Programming Language with a focus on behavioral research problems in gerontology.

GERO 804 - Advanced Qualitative Methods in Gerontology (4)

Examines qualitative research methods used in social science research with special emphasis on gerontology. Specific focus will be placed on conducting interviews and participant-observations; field-notes, analyzing text-based data; and writing of qualitative studies.

GERO 806 - Interdisciplinary Theories in Gerontology (4)

Reviews major theories used in gerontology from diverse fields covering the individual and society, including environment and aging; health and aging; social and family relationships; social change; and behavioural change. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the fundamental assumptions of human aging experience underlying the theories; critical assessment of theoretical propositions; research evidence; and potential for synthesis.

GERO 810 - Community-based Housing, Health and Support Services for Older Adults (4)

This course presents an in-depth examination of theory, research and policy related to planning, designing, developing and managing housing for independent and semi-independent older adults.

GERO 811 - Institutional Living Environments (4)

This course focuses on design issues, theory, research and policy relevant to planning, developing and managing institutional living environments for dependent adults.

GERO 820 - Principles and Practices of Health Promotion (4)

This course is designed to cover and critically evaluate concepts, models and theories of health promotion and wellness in the aging population. These methods of implementation will be discussed in relation to individual and structural health system issues facing the aged.

GERO 822 - Families, Communities and Health (4)

Critically evaluates and synthesizes key theory, research and health promotion policy related to the intersection of aging families, communities and health. The principal theoretical perspectives will include: life course theory; social, human and cultural capital; ecological models; political economy; and community empowerment approaches. Equivalent Courses: GERO840.

GERO 823 - Mental Health and Illness in Later Life (4)

Provides an overview of the range of mental illnesses affecting older adults, their respective diagnostic criteria, and empirically validated treatments (disorders with their onset in later life and those that extend into later years). Particular emphasis will be placed on the manner in which psychopathology presents differently among older adults, various theories of aetiology, barriers to diagnosis and treatment, and the social context in which mental illness is understood and treated across cultures.

GERO 830 - Aging in a Technological World (4)

Looks at the way information and communication technologies are transforming social and healthcare landscapes and explores how new technology impacts on the independence, social participation and quality of life of older people.

GERO 840 - Special Topics in Gerontology (4)

This course offers an opportunity to offer a specialized course in an area germane to the program but on a topic that is outside of the regular courses.

GERO 850 - MA Internship (4)

Students who do not have prior work experience in gerontology will secure placement in a public or private organization connected to gerontology. The work they undertake must be of sufficient depth and breadth to allow the student the opportunity to demonstrate his or her acquired knowledge and skills. Students will be required to produce a work report that will be an appraisal of the student's work experience. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: MA in Gerontology students in good academic standing who have successfully completed a Criminal Record Check.

GERO 889 - Directed Studies (4)

This course consists of supervised readings in a particular field of specialization relevant to the selected area of concentration.

GERO 896 - Project Proposal

Students will prepare a written research proposal prior to commencing research leading to the MA Project. The student will present their proposal to their supervisory committee only. The proposal will receive a grade of S or U. An unsatisfactory grade in the project proposal will trigger review by the Gerontology graduate committee as outlined in graduate general regulation 1.8.2. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

GERO 897 - Thesis Proposal

Students will prepare a written research proposal prior to commencing research leading to the MA Thesis. The student will present and orally defend their proposal to their supervisory committee and other members of the Gerontology community. The proposal will receive a grade of S or U. An unsatisfactory grade in the written proposal or oral defense will trigger review by the Gerontology graduate committee as outlined in graduate general regulation 1.8.2. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

GERO 898 - MA Project (6)

A project must be written under committee supervision for formal examination as part of the program requirements for students in the project stream.

GERO 899 - MA Thesis (6)

A thesis must be written under committee supervision for formal examination as part of the program requirements for students in the thesis stream.

GERO 994 - Comprehensive Examination I (3)

After completion of all coursework, students will write two comprehensive examinations based on reading lists developed with their supervisory committee. This first examination will cover the substantive literature in the thesis field. Examinations will receive a grade of S or U. A student who receives an unsatisfactory grade in a comprehensive examination will have one chance for re-examination. All re-examinations will require an oral defense. A second unsatisfactory grade will trigger a review of unsatisfactory progress under GGR 1.8.2 which may lead to withdrawal. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: All coursework towards the PhD in Gerontology.

GERO 995 - Comprehensive Examination II (3)

After completion of all coursework, students will write two comprehensive examinations based on reading lists developed with their supervisory committee. This second examination will be determined by the supervisory committee based on the current and anticipated research needs of the student. Examinations will receive a grade of S or U. A student who receives an unsatisfactory grade in a comprehensive examination will have one chance for re-examination. All re-examinations will require an oral defense. A second unsatisfactory grade will trigger a review of unsatisfactory progress under GGR 1.8.2 which may lead to withdrawal. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: All coursework towards the PhD in Gerontology.

GERO 996 - Thesis Proposal

Students will prepare a written research proposal prior to commencing research leading to the PhD thesis. In general, the proposal will integrate a review of the relevant research literature and describe research methodology appropriate to the principal research question, expected results and their significance. The student will orally present and defend the proposal before their supervisory committee. The proposal and oral defense will receive a grade of S or U. An unsatisfactory grade in the written proposal or oral defense will trigger review by the Gerontology graduate committee as outlined in graduate general regulation 1.8.2. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: GERO 994 and GERO 995.

GERO 998 - PhD Thesis (6)