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To view the Fall 2017 Academic Calendar go to http://www.sfu.ca/students/calendar/2017/fall.html

Philosophy Courses

PHIL 100W - Knowledge and Reality (3)

An introduction to some of the central problems of philosophy. Topics to be discussed include the different theories of reality; the nature and sources of knowledge, truth, evidence, and reason; the justification of belief and knowledge about the universe. These topics and problems will be considered as they arise in the context of issues such as: relativism versus absolutism; the existence of God; personal identity; the nature of the mind and its relation to the body; free will and determinism; the possibility of moral knowledge. Open to all students. Students with credit for PHIL 100 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

PHIL 105 - Critical Thinking (3)

An introduction to the evaluation of arguments as they are encountered in everyday life. The central aim will be to sharpen skills of reasoning and argumentation by understanding how arguments work and learning to distinguish those which actually prove what they set out to show from those which do not. Open to all students. Student with credit for PHIL XX1 may not take this course for further credit. Q/Breadth-Social Sci/Sciences.

PHIL 110 - Introduction to Logic and Reasoning (3)

The aim of this course is to familiarize students with fundamental techniques of correct reasoning. Special attention is given to the methods of logic in particular, and to their role in the discovery of truth not only within science and philosophy but within all forms of rational enquiry. Open to all students. Quantitative.

PHIL 120W - Moral Problems (3)

A critical examination of a range of questions and problems we confront as moral agents, such as: the nature and scope of our moral responsibilities, the source of our moral and civil rights, and the role of moral emotions, like resentment, love and forgiveness. Students with credit for PHIL 120 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

PHIL 121 - Global Justice (3)

An introduction to the ethical issues arising from interactions of states, NGOs and other international agents. Topics may include international human rights, terrorism, war, gender justice, climate justice, fairness in international trade, cultural diversity and conflict, the rights of indigenous peoples, collective responsibility and restitution for historical wrongdoing, among others. Students who have received credit for PHIL 220 cannot receive credit for this course. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

PHIL 131 - Selected Topics (3)

A specific topic, philosopher or philosophical work to be dealt with as occasion and demand warrant. Students may repeat this course for further credit under a different topic. Breadth-Humanities.

PHIL 144 - Introduction to Philosophy of Science (3)

An introduction to philosophical issues concerning the nature of science. Topics to be discussed include the distinction between science and pseudo-science, the nature of scientific method, the nature of explanation in the natural and social sciences, the phenomenon of scientific change, the relationship between scientific theory and observation, and the objectivity of social science. Students with credit for PHIL 244 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities/Sciences.

PHIL 150 - History of Philosophy I (3)

A survey of philosophic thought from late antiquity to the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the works of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Aquinas. The views of these great thinkers have helped to shape the ways in which we see the world. This course is therefore recommended to everyone with an interest in our intellectual heritage. Open to all students. Breadth-Humanities.

PHIL 151 - History of Philosophy II (3)

A survey of philosophic thought from the Renaissance to the 20th Century. Special attention will be given to the works of Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Hegel and Mill. The views of these great thinkers have helped to shape the ways in which we see the world. This course is therefore recommended to everyone with an interest in our intellectual heritage. Open to all students. Breadth-Humanities.

PHIL 201 - Epistemology (3)

A critical overview of recent accounts of the nature and scope of human knowledge and of justified or rational belief, and of philosophical issues that these accounts are intended to address. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 100W (or equivalent), 120W (or equivalent), 121, 144, 150, 151, or COGS 100. Students who have taken PHIL 301 cannot take this course for further credit.

PHIL 203 - Metaphysics (3)

An examination of central problems of metaphysics such as space and time, universals and particulars, substance, identity and individuation and personal identity. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 100W (or equivalent), 120W (or equivalent), 121, 144, 150, 151, or COGS 100.

PHIL 210 - Natural Deductive Logic (3)

This course studies a natural deductive system of propositional and quantificational logic, the first-order theory of identity and the first-order theory of relations. Topics include the metatheory of propositional logic and the application of formal theory to the assessment of natural language arguments. Quantitative.

PHIL 221 - Ethical Theory (3)

An examination of the major ethical theories, including deontology, consequentialism and virtue ethics. Applications of theses theories and related topics in value theory may also be discussed. Prerequisite: One of: PHIL 100W (or equivalent), PHIL 120W (or equivalent), PHIL 121, PHIL 144, PHIL 150 or PHIL 151.

PHIL 280 - Introduction to Existentialism (3)

A study of existentialist philosophers such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, and Camus and a survey of precursors such as Kant and Hegel.

PHIL 300 - Introduction to Philosophy (3)

An introductory course specifically intended for students in other departments who have at least 60 units. This course is more advanced than 100 and 200 division courses and is of interest to students not only in the humanities, but also in the natural and social sciences. Normally, students with credit for PHIL 100 may not take this course for further credit. This course does not count towards the upper division requirements for a student pursuing a minor, major, or honors program in philosophy. Prerequisite: At least 60 units. Breadth-Humanities.

PHIL 302 - Topics in Epistemology and Metaphysics (3)

An exploration of philosophical issues concerning, e.g.: causation, time, modality, or the self; the realism/nominalism or realism/idealism debate; relativism; the concept of truth; naturalized epistemology; global epistemological skepticism or perhaps a 'local' form of skepticism such as skepticism about induction or about sensory belief. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PHIL 201 or 203.

PHIL 310 - Axiomatic Logic (3)

This course studies the metatheory of axiomatic propositional and quantificational logic. Topics include proof theory, the metatheory of propositional logic, the proof theory of first-order logic, first-order models, soundness and completeness. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 110, 210, MACM 101, MATH 144, CMPT 205. Students with credit for PHIL 214 and/or PHIL 314 in Spring 2014 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

PHIL 314 - Topics in Logic I (3)

An examination of one or more topics such as: philosophical logic; deontic logic; the logic of knowledge and belief; the logic of preference; tense logics; foundations of set theory; recursive functions; the history of logic. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 110, 210 or 310, or with the approval of the instructor or department.

PHIL 320 - Social and Political Philosophy (3)

An examination of an issue or selection of issues in social and political philosophy. Contemporary or historical readings or a mixture of these will be used. Possible topics include: justice, the law and legal systems, sovereignty, power and authority, democracy, liberty and equality. Sometimes the course will focus on the views of historically important political philosophers, such as Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Bentham, Mill and Marx. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 220, 221 or ENV 320W.

PHIL 321 - Topics in Moral Philosophy (3)

An advanced investigation of central issues and theories in moral philosophy. In any given term, the course may focus on a general theory or concept or concern, for example meta-ethics, utilitarianism, or theories of rights. Sometimes it will focus on a particular problem or problems, such as medical ethics, moral personhood, or free will and moral responsibility. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 220, 221 or ENV 320W.

PHIL 322 - History of Ethics (3)

An examination of an issue or selection of issues in the history of moral or political philosophy. Historical readings will be the primary focus and may include important figures such as Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Hume, and Kant. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 150, 151, 220 or 221.

PHIL 327 - Global Health Ethics (3)

Ethical issues related to public health as they are located in and influenced by a global context. Consideration of several ethical approaches including utilitarianism, deontic ethics, and the capabilities approach, as well as theories of justice. Application of approaches to topics ranging from global markets in human organs to international migration of health workers and pharmaceutical testing in the developing world. Prerequisite: 60 units and one of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121 or 221; or HSCI 319. PHIL 327 is identical to HSCI 327 and students may not receive credit for both. Students who have completed HSCI 320 or the spring 2011 offering of PHIL 331 may not complete this course for further credit.

PHIL 328 - Environmental Philosophy (3)

A survey of contemporary issues in environmental ethics. Topics may include: animal rights, the intrinsic value of nature, 'deep ecology', obligations to future generations, conservation, environmental justice, as well as relevant background materials in ethical theory. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 220, 221 or ENV 320W. Students who have completed PHIL 318 may not take this course for further credit.

PHIL 329 - Law and Philosophy (3)

Explores in detail classic problems in the law using the methods and resources of philosophy. Topics may include: the philosophy of punishment and theories of moral responsibility; charter equality rights and the nature of social equality; constitutional interpretation and the philosophy of language; the assessment of evidence and formal epistemology; the intellectual origins of the theory of natural law and natural rights. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 220, 221, ENV 320W, or with permission of instructor. Students with credit for PHIL 333 in Spring 2016 cannot take this course for further credit.

PHIL 331 - Selected Topics (3)

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: As stated by department at time of offering.

PHIL 332 - Selected Topics (3)

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: As stated by department at time of offering.

PHIL 333 - Selected Topics (3)

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: As stated by department at time of offering.

PHIL 341 - Philosophy of Science (3)

A study of the nature of scientific enquiry, classificatory systems, laws and theories, the role of observation in science, the demarcation between science and non-science, causality, the status of theoretical constructs, and teleological explanation. Prerequisite: Either one of: PHIL 201 or 203; or both of PHIL 100W (or equivalent) and COGS 200.

PHIL 343 - Philosophy of Mind (3)

A study of theories of the mind, consciousness, and human action. Prerequisite: Either one of: PHIL 201 or 203; or both of PHIL 100W (or equivalent) and COGS 200.

PHIL 344 - Philosophy of Language (3)

An introduction to the major philosophic theories of language. Topics to be considered include the relationship between language and mind, language and the world, language and society. Prerequisite: Either one of: PHIL 201 or 203; or both of PHIL 100W (or equivalent) and COGS 200.

PHIL 350 - Ancient Philosophy (3)

Examines central philosophical themes and figures in ancient philosophy. Topics may include justice, knowledge, the good life, time, change, appearance and reality, the nature of God, and others. Historical readings will be the central focus and may include works by Plato, Aristotle, Thales, Anaximander, Pythagoras, Parmenides and others. Prerequisite: PHIL 100W (or equivalent) or 150.

PHIL 352 - 17th Century Philosophy (3)

An examination of some central issues in 17th century philosophy. Themes may include: changing theories of causation, of the mind, and of the relation between mind and world. Historical readings will be the primary focus and may include important figures such as Descartes, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Malebranche, Spinoza, Leibniz, and Locke. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 100W (or equivalent) or 151. Students who have completed PHIL 353 or PHIL 354 prior to Fall 2006 may not take this course for further credit.

PHIL 356 - 18th Century Philosophy (3)

An examination of some central issues of 18th century philosophy. Themes may include the development of the theory of ideas and epistemology associated with it. The primary focus may include important figures such as Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Condillac. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 100W (or equivalent) or 151. Students with credit for PHIL 355 prior to Fall 2006 may not take this course for further credit.

PHIL 357 - Topics in the History of Philosophy (3)

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 100W (or equivalent), 150, or 151.

PHIL 358 - 19th Century Philosophy (3)

An examination of some major figures in 19th century philosophy. Themes may include German idealism and romanticism, British idealism, positivism and American pragmatism; studied figures may include Schopenhauer, Fichte, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Comte, Kierkegaard, Brentano,Meinong, Mill, Pierce and James, depending on theme. Prerequisite: PHIL 100W (or equivalent) or 151.

PHIL 421W - Advanced Topics in Ethical Theory (4)

A highly focused, advanced examination of a selection of topics in normative or meta-ethics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: two 300 level PHIL courses; it is strongly recommended that students have taken some prior course in moral theory. Writing.

PHIL 435 - Selected Topics (4)

A specific topic, philosopher or philosophical work to be dealt with as occasion and demand warrant. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Two 300 level PHIL courses.

PHIL 451W - Advanced Topics in the History of Philosophy (4)

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: two 300 level PHIL courses. Writing.

PHIL 455W - Contemporary Issues in Epistemology and Metaphysics (4)

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Two 300 division PHIL courses. Writing.

PHIL 467W - Seminar II (4)

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Two 300 division PHIL courses. Writing.

PHIL 477 - Honours Tutorial I (5)

At least eight weeks prior to the term in which they wish to enrol in PHIL 477, honours students should arrange for faculty supervision of the course and arrange for departmental approval of a proposed syllabus. Open only to honours students. PHIL 477 is a requisite for all honours students. It must be taken concurrently with or prior to PHIL 478.

PHIL 478 - Honours Tutorial II (5)

At least eight weeks prior to the term in which they wish to enrol in PHIL 478, honours students should arrange for faculty supervision of the course and arrange for departmental approval of a proposed syllabus. Open only to honours students. Prerequisite: PHIL 478 is a requisite for all honours students. It must be taken concurrently with or consecutively to PHIL 477.

PHIL 802 - Selected Topics in Epistemology (5)

PHIL 803 - Selected Topics in Metaphysics (5)

PHIL 804 - Selected Topics in Philosophy of Science (5)

PHIL 805 - Selected Topics in Philosophy of Mind (5)

PHIL 806 - Selected Topics in Philosophy of Language (5)

PHIL 812 - Selected Topics in Logic I (5)

PHIL 813 - Selected Topics in Logic II (5)

PHIL 814 - Selected Topics in Philosophy of Mathematics (5)

PHIL 815 - Selected Topics in Formal Studies (5)

PHIL 822 - Selected Topics in Normative Ethics (5)

PHIL 823 - Selected Topics Meta-Ethics (5)

PHIL 824 - Selected Topics Moral Psychology (5)

PHIL 825 - Selected Topics in Social and Political Philosophy (5)

PHIL 826 - Selected Topics in Aesthetics (5)

PHIL 852 - Selected Topics in Ancient Philosophy (5)

PHIL 853 - Selected Topics in Medieval Philosophy (5)

PHIL 854 - Selected Topics in Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Philosophy (5)

PHIL 855 - Selected Topics in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Philosophy (5)

PHIL 861 - Directed Studies: Selected Topics I (5)

PHIL 862 - Directed Studies: Selected Topics II (5)

PHIL 864 - Directed Studies: Selected Topics IV (5)

PHIL 865 - Directed Studies: Selected Topics V (5)

PHIL 880 - Pro-Seminar (5)

PHIL 898 - MA Thesis (6)

PHIL 899 - Non-Thesis Project Completion (6)

PHIL 998 - PhD Thesis (6)