Please note:

To view the Fall 2017 Academic Calendar go to http://www.sfu.ca/students/calendar/2017/fall.html

Department of Sociology and Anthropology Simon Fraser University Calendar | Spring 2018

Anthropology Major

Bachelor of Arts

Program Requirements

Students complete 120 units, as specified below.

Lower Division Requirements

Students should complete all lower division requirements before completing upper division courses.

Students must complete a minimum of 22 units in lower division SA courses, including all of

SA 101 - Introduction to Anthropology (A) (4)

An introduction to the study of human social and cultural life from an anthropological perspective. The course will explore the scope and nature of the discipline of anthropology through study of selected cases drawn from both technologically simple communities and complex modern industrial societies. Students with credit for SA 170 may not take SA 101 for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences. Equivalent Courses: SA170. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Bascom Guffin
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
EDB 7618, Burnaby
D101
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
D102
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5035, Burnaby
D103
Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5020, Burnaby
D104
Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5014, Burnaby
D105
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2521, Burnaby
D106
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2501, Burnaby
D900 Bascom Guffin
Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SUR 5240, Surrey
D901
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 5060, Surrey
D902
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 5320, Surrey
D903
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 2990, Surrey
D904
Th 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SUR 2990, Surrey
SA 150 - Introduction to Sociology (S) (4)

The study of basic concerns of sociology, such as social order, social change, social conflict and social inequality. Breadth-Social Sciences. Equivalent Courses: PSA.101. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Kyle Willmott
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
D101
Mo 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D102
Mo 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D103
Mo 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D104
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 2120, Burnaby
D105
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5046, Burnaby
D106
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D107
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D108
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2501, Burnaby
D109
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D110
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
WMC 2523, Burnaby
D111
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
WMC 2501, Burnaby
D112
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D113
We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 3517, Burnaby
D114
We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 3515, Burnaby
D115
We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5026, Burnaby
D116
We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 3515, Burnaby
D117
We 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
D118
We 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
TASC2 7201, Burnaby
D900 Kyle Willmott
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SUR 3090, Surrey
D901
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 3010, Surrey
D902
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 3150, Surrey
D903
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 3010, Surrey
D904
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 3260, Surrey
D905
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SUR 3010, Surrey
D906
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SUR 3260, Surrey
SA 201W - Anthropology and Contemporary Life (A) (4)

An introduction to the anthropological perspective as applied to the organization of everyday life in contemporary settings. Introduces positivist, interpretive, and critical interpretive approaches to the analysis of social actions, identities, and values as enacted in space and time. Students with credit for SA 291 may not take SA 201W for further credit. Recommended: SA 101. Writing. Prerequisite: . Equivalent Courses: SA201 SA291. Writing.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
SA 255 - Introduction to Social Research (SA) (4)

Explores how sociologists and anthropologists investigate social relations and contexts. Students learn to develop research questions and turn them into research projects. Introduces data collection techniques and related ethical issues, the relationship between theory and research, and other fundamental concepts and issues involved in conducting qualitative and quantitative research. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nicholas Scott
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 10921, Burnaby
D101
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 6136, Burnaby
D102
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 3515, Burnaby
D103
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 3515, Burnaby
SA 257 - Understanding Quantitative Research in Sociology and Anthropology (SA) (4)

Takes the mystery, but not the magic, out of quantitative research in anthropology and sociology by introducing analytical skills necessary for reading, understanding, and critiquing quantitative research. Students evaluate popular coverage of social research; learn concepts related to statistical significance; conduct basic statistical analysis, including designing graphs and tables. Prerequisite: Pre and/or co-requisite SA 255. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Suzanna Crage
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
BLU 10031, Burnaby
D101
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5040, Burnaby

and one additional 200 division course designated (A), (S), or (SA).

Upper Division Requirements

Students complete a minimum of 30 upper division units including

SA 301 - Contemporary Ethnography (A) (4)

A consideration of key themes in contemporary anthropology. This course addresses theoretical and methodological questions by examining the work of contemporary anthropologists conducting research in diverse locations around the world. Prerequisite: SA 201W. Students with credit for SA 370 may not take SA 301 for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Noel Dyck
Mo 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 6206, Burnaby
SA 356W - Ethnography and Qualitative Methods (SA) (4)

An examination of qualitative field methods, including participant observation, interviewing, archival research, cross-cultural research, life histories, network analysis, mapping, and ethical problems of fieldwork. Prerequisite: SA 255. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jennifer Shaw
Fr 9:30 AM – 1:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
SA 402 - The Practice of Anthropology (A) (4)

An examination of the ways in which anthropology and ethnography may be used to affect action in the world. Topics may include: advocacy anthropology; the development and practice of applied anthropology; the emergence of anthropology and ethnography and the arts. Prerequisite: minimum of 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Recommended: at least two upper division courses in anthropology.

and two upper division courses chosen from SA courses designated (A).

An additional 3 upper division courses are required, to be chosen from SA courses designated as (A), (S) or (SA).

No more than 4 units of Directed Readings and no more than 15 upper division units transferred from another institution may be used towards completion.

In our information-based society, many employers and most graduate schools require considerable knowledge of conceptualizing research problems, information gathering, analysis and presentation. Students are strongly urged to balance theory courses with methods courses above the minimum and they may choose to range broadly across the two disciplines or to focus on a special interest. Courses fall broadly into the following groups.

  • Courses in Anthropology (A)
  • Courses in Sociology (S)
  • Courses in Sociology and Anthropology (SA)

Courses in Anthropology (A)

SA 301 - Contemporary Ethnography (A) (4)

A consideration of key themes in contemporary anthropology. This course addresses theoretical and methodological questions by examining the work of contemporary anthropologists conducting research in diverse locations around the world. Prerequisite: SA 201W. Students with credit for SA 370 may not take SA 301 for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Noel Dyck
Mo 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 6206, Burnaby
SA 318 - The Anthropology of Medicine (A) (4)

Explores the role of biomedicine in society and culture through inquiry into the social and ideological organization of health and healing. Special attention will be paid to how biomedical categories structure experiences of the body, how means of life and death are shaped through medical interventions, and how social relations organize the delivery of biomedical technologies. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 319 - Transnational Aging (A) (4)

Explores how mobility and migration across borders influence the lives of older people, with attention to how multigenerational transnational families mutually negotiate care and support. Political and socio-cultural factors will be examined through case studies from around the world in order to assess how we age in a transnational world. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Parin Dossa
Tu, Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7100, Burnaby
SA 323 - Symbol, Myth and Meaning (A) (4)

An examination of myth, symbolism, ritual and cosmological systems. Anthropological theories of magic, possession, witchcraft, healing and religious movements analyzed in ethnographic context. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 332 - The Anthropology of Childhood (A) (4)

A cross-cultural examination of the social and cultural relations that shape childhood in different settings. Topics to be considered could include: the social definition of childhood and child rearing; the institutional arrangements established for children and youth and the impact that these have on children, families, and society; the social construction of child and youth cultures. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Pamela Stern
Mo, We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
TASC2 8500, Burnaby
SA 352 - Games, Sports and Cultures (A) (4)

An anthropological examination of games and sports in cross-cultural perspective. Particular attention will be given to the social construction of games and athletic activities as well as the cultural, political and aesthetic meanings attached to these. Topics that may be examined include: the embodiment of culture in sporting activities; the impact of inter-cultural contact and globalization on games and sport; the shaping of gender, class and ethnic identities through sport involvement; appropriate methodologies for producing sport ethnographies. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Noel Dyck
Tu 8:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 3533, Burnaby
SA 359 - Special Topics in Anthropology (A) (4)

Explores a topic in Anthropology not regularly offered by the department. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 365 - Selected Regional Areas (A) (4)

An examination of selected aspects of the social structure, culture and the processes of social change in varying regional areas. The focus will vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 368 - Language, Ideology, and Power (A) (4)

Examines how language shapes and is shaped by culture, power, and social relations and introduces the major concepts, approaches, and theories used by anthropologists in the investigation of relations between language and cultural forms. Prerequisite: SA 101, 201W, or 150.

SA 375 - Labour and the Arts of Living (A) (4)

Introduces sociocultural approaches to labour by examining the relationship between work and life in different parts of the world. Students will be given opportunities to reflect on their own working lives and aspirations for future employment. Topics include precarity, informality, unemployment, wageless life, work and citizenship, and post-work politics. Prerequisite: SA 101 or SA 150 or SA 201W. Students who have taken SA 360 in Spring 2014 or Spring 2016 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jennifer Shaw
We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
HCC 2205, Vancouver
SA 388 - Comparative Studies of Minority Indigenous Peoples (A) (4)

The social and cultural patterns of aboriginal populations within various modern nation-states. Their relations with majority societies and with other indigenous groups across the world. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 402 - The Practice of Anthropology (A) (4)

An examination of the ways in which anthropology and ethnography may be used to affect action in the world. Topics may include: advocacy anthropology; the development and practice of applied anthropology; the emergence of anthropology and ethnography and the arts. Prerequisite: minimum of 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Recommended: at least two upper division courses in anthropology.

SA 418 - International Health: Global Policies and Local Realities (A) (4)

An investigation of the social, cultural, and political issues that contribute to problems of ill-health in resource-poor countries and the major efforts in international public health to address these problems. It explores the application of knowledge about social, and especially gender relations in international health, with particular attention to local perspectives and grassroots initiatives. Institutional frameworks intended to promote health development are examined in historical and contemporary perspective through case studies on topics such as: malaria, population control, maternal health, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis. Prerequisite: 90 credit hours, which must include SA 101 or 150. Highly recommended: SA 218, 302W and 318. Breadth-Social Sciences.

SA 421 - Commodities and Substances: Bodies, Consumption and Ingestion (A) (4)

Addresses current theoretical and methodological approaches to the anthropological study of consumption and ingestion of diverse substances. Topics include historical perspectives on production, distribution and consumption; power and meaning; inequality and governance of legal and illegal drugs, drug foods, medicines and diverse populations of consumers and ingesters. Prerequisite: Minimum of 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or 201W, or graduate student status in Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences or Faculty of Health Sciences. Students who have taken SA 460 may not take this course for further credit.

SA 451 - Issues in Anthropological Theory (A) (4)

A senior seminar on current perspectives in anthropological theory. Emphasis will differ from semester to semester. Prerequisite: Minimum of 72 units including SA 301, a GPA of at least 3.25 and consent of the instructor.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Michael Hathaway
Mo 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
AQ 5067, Burnaby
SA 459 - Special Topics in Anthropology (A) (4)

An advanced seminar devoted to an in-depth examination of a topic in Anthropology not regularly offered by the department. Prerequisite: Minimum 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 472 - Anthropology and the Past (A) (4)

Anthropologists frequently turn to historical documents (traveller's reports, missionary archives, etc.) in order to reconstruct the nature of past societies; likewise, every society has a sense of its own past and represents it in its own way. This course examines the relation between history and anthropology. Content may include: the use of historical material in anthropological research; construction of traditional knowledge as a cultural process; history and the politics of culture; the relation between individual and collective memory. Prerequisite: Minimum of 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 496 - Directed Readings in Anthropology (A) (4)

Directed readings in a selected field of study under the direction of a single faculty member. A paper will be required. Prerequisite: minimum of 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Students with credit for SA 497 may not take SA 496 for further credit.

Courses in Sociology (S)

SA 300 - Canadian Social Structure (S) (4)

An analysis of the social institutions and structure of Canadian society. The focus of the course will vary from semester to semester, but typically it will examine different theoretical approaches to the study of Canada and, from these, develop a framework for the analysis of Canadian social institutions and class structure. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 304 - Social Control (S) (4)

This course examines how the organization of control (formal and informal) affects both individuals and society. It will investigate how control takes form, how it functions, the ideologies supporting it, and the resistance it produces. We will ask the following questions: who are the agents of social control; who or what do they control; and how do they control? Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kyle Willmott
Mo 9:30 AM – 1:20 PM
SWH 10061, Burnaby
SA 321 - Social Movements (S) (4)

A study of the sources, development and effects of social movements in transitional and modernized societies. Specific types of movements will be analysed. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 325 - Political Sociology (S) (4)

An examination of the relations of power and authority. This course will analyze the interrelations of family, church, class, interest groups, etc., particularly as they influence and are influenced by the state. The relations of law and ideology to the structures of government will form the context for this analysis. The course may also focus on broad theoretical questions of contemporary political interest. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Gary Teeple
Tu, Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
BLU 9655, Burnaby
SA 326 - Ecology and Social Thought (S) (4)

An examination of recent social thought that is concerned with environmental and ecological themes. It will address a selection from the following themes: technology evaluation; technology and science as ideology; ecology and social inequality; the concepts of ecosystem, environment and wilderness; the self-world relationship; politics of environmental uses; environment and the economy. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 327 - Sociology of Knowledge (S) (4)

An examination of sociological theories concerning the interaction of social structures, and meaning and belief systems. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 331 - Politics of the Family (S) (4)

A sociological examination of the contested nature of contemporary domestic and intimate relations. The course will focus on debates arising from equality movement politics (e.g. gender, sexuality, race). Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 335 - Gender Relations and Social Issues (S) (4)

A sociological study of the position of women and men in major social institutions in western industrial societies, in particular Canada. Social institutions that may be examined include: the family, education, the economy, the polity, law, and the mass media. Particular attention will be paid to social policy issues. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Students with credit for SA 292 (when offered as gender relations) or GSWS 308 (or WS 308) may not take SA 335 for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D900 Deborah Dergousoff
We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SUR 5320, Surrey
SA 337 - Sexuality and Society (S) (4)

The categories that organize our understandings of sex, gender and sexuality have powerful histories and roles in organizing social relations in western society. Social activists and academics contest the naturalness of these categories, particularly that of the binary opposition between male and female, and related assumptions about sexuality and sexual orientation. This course encompasses a range of perspectives on sex/gender identity, sexuality, and the relationship between the two. These perspectives include feminist, lesbian and gay, and queer and transgender challenges to traditional understandings of sex/gender identity and sexuality. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 350 - Classical Sociological Thought (S) (4)

An examination of aspects of the work of one or more of the nineteenth or early twentieth century sociological theorists. Prerequisite: SA 250.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Yildiz Atasoy
Mo 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5039, Burnaby
SA 351 - Classical Marxist Thought (S) (4)

A detailed study of classical Marxist social thought. Prerequisite: SA 250.

SA 353 - Sociology of Sport (S) (4)

A sociological examination of sport focuses on the role of this important set of institutions and activities in shaping social relations and understandings about difference and identity. Sport has a long history of naturalizing racial and gender differences in such a way as to reinforce and reflect social inequality more broadly. Racial segregation in sport (at least in formal legal terms) is no longer considered acceptable in western societies or in the Olympic movement at the global level. But the power of sport in reinforcing and naturalizing racial inequality continues while the naturalness and inevitability of sex segregation in sport remains largely unchallenged. This course will explore the relationships between sport and social inequality, sport and nationalism, and sport and the economy. Prerequisite: Minimum of 30 units including SA 150. Students with credit for SA 216 or SA 315 (when offered as Society of Leisure) may not take this course for further credit.

SA 355 - Quantitative Methods (S) (4)

Examines the methods, concepts and statistical procedures central to quantitative sociological research. Emphasizing the meaningful application of statistical analysis to social issues, the course provides intermediate quantitative research skills. Students use statistics software to conduct applicable statistical analyses and interpret results. Prerequisite: SA 255 and SA 257. Students with credit for SA 355 may not take POL 315 for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Suzanna Crage
Mo 9:30 AM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5040, Burnaby
SA 362 - Society and the Changing Global Division of Labour (S) (4)

An examination of the social and political implications of the global economy. Topics to be considered include the influence of neo-liberal economics, the decline of the national welfare state, transnational political agencies and public policy, the internationalization of culture, the global labour market, the 'world city' hypothesis, ethnic resurgence and alternatives to these developments. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 366 - Special Topics in Sociology (S) (4)

Explores a topic in Sociology not regularly offered by the department. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Gerardo Otero
We 9:30 AM – 1:20 PM
WMC 3535, Burnaby
E100 Yildiz Atasoy
We 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 2270, Vancouver
SA 410 - Sociology of Dangerous Classes (S) (4)

Offers specialized instruction on advanced topics pertaining to the social and moral regulation of human subjects in both historical and contemporary contexts. It explores the ideologies, policies and practices of regulation and governance in application to selected social contexts and subjects including, but not confined to, welfare, justice, medicine, the 'psy' sciences, immigration, labour, sexuality, pornography, racialization, gender and family. Students will acquire specialized knowledge about the profound impact of civil and state regulation projects on societies past and present, and about the rich diversity of institutional, cultural and human experience that these social ordering ideologies, policies and practices encompass. Prerequisite: Minimum of 72 units including either SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 416 - Sociology of Art Forms (S) (4)

This course may focus variously on one or all of the following: the social origins and functions of art, sociological theories of aesthetics, and contemporary issues in art, such as the fate of art in modern society, popular culture, mass media, ideology in art. Prerequisite: Minimum of 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 417 - Contemporary Issues in Medical Sociology (S) (4)

An examination of sociological approaches to the study of health and health care, emphasizing the connections between social theory and empirical data. Topics may include: the social determinants of health, health inequities, the structure and reform of health care systems, and the application of human rights frameworks to the study of health. Prerequisite: Minimum of 72 units which must include SA 101 or 150 or 201W, or must have graduate student status in the Faculty of Health Sciences. Students who have taken SA 360 Special Topics: Medical Sociology in 2006-3 may not take this course for further credit.

SA 420 - Sociology of Aging (S) (4)

The structural and behavioral implications of aging. Topics included will be: demographic aspects of aging; the relationship of aging to political, economic, familial and other social institutions; the psychological significance of aging. Prerequisite: 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or SA 201W, or acceptance into the diploma program in gerontology, or by consent of instructor. This course is identical to GERO 420 and students cannot take both courses for credit. Students may use GERO 420 to fulfil their major or minor requirements in lieu of SA 420.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
SA 450 - Advanced Sociological Theory (S) (4)

A senior seminar on current perspectives in sociological theory. Emphasis will differ from semester to semester. Prerequisite: Minimum of 72 units including SA 350, a GPA of at least 3.25 and consent of the instructor.

SA 461 - Special Topics in Sociology (S) (4)

An advanced seminar devoted to an in-depth examination of a topic in Sociology not regularly offered by the department. Prerequisite: Minimum 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 497 - Directed Readings in Sociology (S) (4)

Directed readings in a selected field of study under the direction of a single faculty member. A paper will be required. Prerequisite: minimum of 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Students with credit for SA 496 may not take SA 497 for further credit.

Courses in Sociology/Anthropology (SA)

These courses count as anthropology or sociology credit whenever they are completed.

SA 302W - Global Problems and the Culture of Capitalism (SA) (4)

An introduction to the political economy and culture of capitalism in relation to global problems. Case studies may focus on issues of population, famine, disease, poverty, environmental destruction, social inequality, and nation-state violence. Resistance, rebellion and social movements in response to these problems also will be addressed. Students who took SA 294 in 03-1, 04-1 and 04-2 may not take SA 302 for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Social Sci.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ataman Avdan
Fr 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SECB 1010, Burnaby
J100 Deborah Dergousoff
Mo 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
SUR 2985, Surrey
SA 315 - New Information Technology and Society (SA) (4)

Explores the new social spaces and social practices fostered by new information technology. Special attention will be paid to who is making decisions about what technologies to adopt and how, what social changes are resulting, and who benefits and who loses. A significant portion of activity in this course will involve direct engagement with new information technology.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Gary Teeple
Tu, Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 3253, Burnaby
SA 316 - Tourism and Social Policy (SA) (4)

An examination of tourism from the perspectives of sociology and anthropology, focusing primarily upon the social and cultural impacts of tourism and the social policy implications of tourism development in different societies. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201w.

SA 322 - Religion and Society (SA) (4)

An examination of the relations between religion and the social environment. Consideration will be given to classical theoretical debates in the anthropology and sociology of religion. Specific topics vary from year to year, and may include: religion in personhood and communities; religion, gender, ethnicity and social class; secularization and secularism; the role of religion in political mobilizations; interreligious relations; religious freedom and citizenship. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 330 - Global Islam (SA) (4)

Explores the interplay between global Islamic politics and European modernity, including the neoliberal remaking of citizens, societies and states. Historical, comparative and global perspectives address the limitations of conventional approaches that situate Islam within dichotomous models of what is western and what is eastern, and modern versus non-modern. Prerequisite: SA 101 or SA 150 or SA 201W. Students who have taken SA 360, Special Topics in Sociology and Anthropology in Fall 2006 (1067) or Fall 2007 (1077), may not take SA 330 for further credit.

SA 340 - Social Issues and Social Policy Analysis (SA) (4)

An examination of how sociological and anthropological theories and methods can be applied to the examination of social problems and issues which become the object of social policy. A central concern of the course is the question of how social issues are defined as problematic. Particular attention will be given to gender, ethnicity, class and generation. Substantive examples of social policy issues will be selected from a number of fields. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Lindsey Freeman
Mo, We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7100, Burnaby
SA 345 - Race, Immigration and the Canadian State (SA) (4)

An introduction to critical perspectives on the social construction of race, nation building and transnational migration, with an emphasis on state policies and the experiences of immigrants. The course will cover a review of colonialism and the construction of racialized labour market. Core topics may include: racialization of space, anti-racist feminist thought, immigration policy, settlement services, multiculturalism, citizenship, racial profiling, diasporas, and refugees. Comparative material will be used to complement the Canadian focus. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
SA 356W - Ethnography and Qualitative Methods (SA) (4)

An examination of qualitative field methods, including participant observation, interviewing, archival research, cross-cultural research, life histories, network analysis, mapping, and ethical problems of fieldwork. Prerequisite: SA 255. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jennifer Shaw
Fr 9:30 AM – 1:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
SA 358 - The Philosophy of the Social Sciences (SA) (4)

An analysis of the nature of explanation in the social sciences: 'mind' and action, positivist and interpretive modes of explanation, sociological and historical explanation, objectivity, forms of relativism, the concept of rationality. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
SA 360 - Special Topics in Sociology and Anthropology (SA) (4)

A seminar exploring a topic not regularly offered by the department. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
J100 Bascom Guffin
Th 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
SUR 2985, Surrey
SA 363 - Process of Development and Underdevelopment (SA) (4)

An examination of sociological and anthropological theories of development and underdevelopment as applied to the Third World. The nature and consequences of world system linkages; colonialism and decolonization; patterns of social change in selected societies and regions. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 364 - Urban Communities and Cultures (SA) (4)

Anthropological approaches to urbanization, the nature of the city as a social system, and urban cultures and lifestyles. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Students with credit for SA 464 may not take SA 364 for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
J100 Lindsey Freeman
Tu 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 1325, Vancouver
SA 371 - The Environment and Society (SA) (4)

An examination of environmental issues in their social context. Environmental issues are on the leading edge of contemporary public concern and public policy debates. This course will examine such issues as the relationship between social organization and mode of subsistence, the politics of hunger, and the way in which human societies in their particular social, historical, and cultural contexts view and interact with the natural world. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nicholas Scott
Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
HCC 2945, Vancouver
SA 386 - The Ethnography of Politics (SA) (4)

An examination of the ways in which ethnographers seek to understand a world experiencing profound changes in the relationships between governments and the societies they govern. Topics to be considered may include: relations between indigenous peoples and governments; the social and cultural dynamics of public policy making; the articulation of human rights issues. The focus of the course will vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Pamela Stern
Mo, We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 6206, Burnaby
SA 429 - Sex, Work, and International Capital (SA) (4)

Through a program of focused readings, films, and case studies, this course examines the experiences of women in the Third World in relation to the global economy and reorganization of states and cultures. The course challenges conventional ways of thinking about everyday life in households and workplaces, and emphasizes that issues which may seem specifically third World-based are shared by many around the world. An awareness of this commonality helps us assess the balance of structural constraints and opportunities, and stimulates a discussion on the organization of alternative ways of living. Prerequisite: A minimum of 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Students who took SA 463 in 2003 SA 460 in 2003 and SA 360 in 2004 may not take this course for further credit.

SA 430 - States, Cultures and Global Transitions (SA) (4)

Through a program of focused readings, case studies, and films, this course offers a new perspective on the study of globalization. It balances classical themes with contemporary approaches to global processes of economic, political, and cultural transformation. The course tackles such topics as the material aspects of cooperation and coercion, class relations in structures of capital accumulation and global governance, and cultural dynamics. Alternatives to Euro-American centrism are explored through the examples of citizenship, cultural politics, ethnic and religious conflicts, human rights, indigenous rights, and women's rights. Prerequisite: Minimum of 72 units including either SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Students with credit for SA 463 completed in 2004-3 may not complete this course for further credit.

SA 460 - Special Topics in Sociology and Anthropology I (SA) (4)

An advanced seminar devoted to an in-depth examination of a topic not regularly offered by the department. Prerequisite: Minimum 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 498 - Field Study in Sociology and/or Anthropology (SA) (8)

Advanced field project in a research setting. Admission dependent on availability of appropriate field placements and departmental supervisory capacity. Prerequisite: Students must successfully complete a Criminal Record Check.

SA 499 - Honours Essay (SA) (8)

An honors essay to be written under the direction of a member of faculty, a copy of which is to be permanently lodged with the department. Applications should be submitted to the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee 4 weeks prior to the beginning of the term in which SA 499 is to be undertaken. Students should submit a paper proposal, a work plan, and confirmation of faculty supervisor.

Theory and methods requirements should be completed early in the upper division. Students are strongly urged to balance theory courses with methods courses over the required minimum.

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Degree Requirements

For all bachelor of arts (BA) programs, students complete 120 units, which includes

  • at least 60 units that must be completed at Simon Fraser University
  • at least 45 upper division units, of which at least 30 upper division units must be completed at Simon Fraser University
  • at least 65 units (including 21 upper division units) in Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences courses
  • satisfaction of the writing, quantitative, and breadth requirements
  • an overall cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and upper division CGPA of at least 2.0, and a program (major, joint major, extended minor, minor) CGPA and upper division CGPA of at least 2.0

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student’s major subject
Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth Must be outside the student’s major subject, and may be lower or upper division
6 units Social Sciences: B-Soc
6 units Humanities: B-Hum
6 units Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth 6 units outside the student’s major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements)

Students choosing to complete a joint major, joint honours, double major, two extended minors, an extended minor and a minor, or two minors may satisfy the breadth requirements (designated or not designated) with courses completed in either one or both program areas.

 

Residency Requirements and Transfer Credit

  • At least half of the program's total units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.
  • At least two thirds of the program's total upper division units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.

Elective Courses

In addition to the courses listed above, students should consult an academic advisor to plan the remaining required elective courses.