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To view the Fall 2017 Academic Calendar go to http://www.sfu.ca/students/calendar/2017/fall.html

Business Simon Fraser University Calendar | Spring 2018

Corporate Environmental and Social Sustainability

Certificate

Limitations

Students may complete either the certificate in Environmental and Social Sustainability or the Sustainable Business joint major program, but not both the certificate and the joint major program.

Grade Requirements

In addition to normal university grade point average requirements, the Beedie School of Business requires a minimum 2.30 overall SFU Business course grade point average for entry into all 300 and 400 division business courses.

For a course to be accepted as fulfilling a prerequisite, or for a lower division requirement, or for a core course to be accepted in a student's program in business, a student must have obtained a minimum grade of C- (C minus).

Program Requirements

Students complete a minimum total of 24 units by completing one of each pair*

BUS 303 - Business, Society and Ethics (3)

This course examines and reviews contemporary thinking on the changing role of business and business persons in the operations of society, particularly Canadian society. The course explores the changing legal, ethical and regulatory environments of business focusing on the critical alignments -- values, policies, technology and legal approaches -- between the modern organization and its broader public. Prerequisite: 60 units. Students with credit for BUS 103, COMM 103, or COMM 303 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Thomas Culham
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SECB 1014, Burnaby
D200 Kathleen Burke
Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
SUR 5240, Surrey
D300 Kathleen Burke
Th 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2230, Burnaby
D400 Sessional
We 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 4150, Burnaby
D500 Michaela Lucas
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 2200, Burnaby
E100 Sessional
Tu 4:30 PM – 7:20 PM
WMC 2220, Burnaby
or ENV 320W - Ethics and the Environment (3)

An introduction to the field of environmental ethics for non-specialists. Addresses questions such as what obligations we have to future generations and the natural world, as well as the extent of these obligations. Prerequisite: Students must have earned at least 45 units. Students who have taken PHIL 333-3 or ENV 399-3 "Special Topics in Environmental Ethics" prior to or in 2011 and students with credit in PHIL 328-3 may not enroll in this course for further credit. Philosophy Majors and Minors may not take this course for credit towards their major or minor degree. Writing.

BUS 393 - Commercial Law (3)

Common law, equity, and statute law; contracts, agency, and negotiable instruments; partnership and corporation law; international commercial law. Prerequisite: 60 units. BUEC 391 is not to be taken concurrently with BUS 393. Students with credit for COMM 393 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Shafik Bhalloo
Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 3210, Burnaby
D101
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
WMC 3251, Burnaby
D102
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 3251, Burnaby
D103
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
D104
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
D200 James Pflanz
Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 5240, Surrey
D201
Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SUR 5060, Surrey
D202
Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SUR 5320, Surrey
D203
Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 5060, Surrey
D204
Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 5320, Surrey
D300 Robert Adamson
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 3003, Burnaby
D301
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D302
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 6122, Burnaby
D303
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 6122, Burnaby
D304
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
TASC2 7201, Burnaby
D400 Shafik Bhalloo
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
ASB 10900, Burnaby
D401
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
TASC2 8500, Burnaby
D402
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D403
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D404
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7102, Burnaby
E100 Robert Adamson
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SSCK 9500, Burnaby
E101
Tu 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
E102
Tu 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
E103
Tu 7:30 PM – 8:20 PM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
E104
Tu 7:30 PM – 8:20 PM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
or ENV 319 - Environmental Law (3)

Provides a practical introduction to the legal system governing the use and protection of the environment in Canada. A central theme is the difference between the law on paper and the law in practice. Prerequisite: Students must have earned at least 45 units. Students who have taken ENV 399-3 "Special Topics in Enviromental Law" in 2012 may not enroll in this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
HCC 2510, Vancouver
EVSC 100 - Introduction to Environmental Science (3)

Introduces students to the study of environmental science. Lecture material spans contributing disciplines, emphasizing integration of diverse concepts to understand environmental problems. Tutorials develop core academic skills in environmental science context. Students who have completed EVSC 200 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Marnie Branfireun
Fr 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 3310, Surrey
D101 Marnie Branfireun
Fr 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SUR 3150, Surrey
D102 Marnie Branfireun
Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SUR 2995, Surrey
D103 Marnie Branfireun
Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SUR 2995, Surrey
D300 Marnie Branfireun
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SWH 10041, Burnaby
D301 Marnie Branfireun
We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
WMC 2533, Burnaby
D302 Marnie Branfireun
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 2533, Burnaby
D303 Marnie Branfireun
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
D304 Marnie Branfireun
Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
D305 Marnie Branfireun
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5014, Burnaby
D306 Marnie Branfireun
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5020, Burnaby
or GEOG 111 - Earth Systems (3)

An introduction to landforms, climates, soils and vegetation; their origins, distributions, interrelationships and roles in the ecosystem. Laboratory work and field trips are included. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Andrew Perkins
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
D101
Fr 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 7108, Burnaby
D102
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7110, Burnaby
D103
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7108, Burnaby
D104
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
RCB 7108, Burnaby
D105
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
RCB 7110, Burnaby
D106
We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 7108, Burnaby
D107
We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 7108, Burnaby
D108
We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 7110, Burnaby
D109
We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7110, Burnaby
D110
We 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
RCB 7110, Burnaby
D111
Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 7110, Burnaby
D112
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 7110, Burnaby
D113
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 7110, Burnaby
D114
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7108, Burnaby
D115
Th 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
RCB 7108, Burnaby
D116
Fr 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7108, Burnaby

and one of

GEOG 100 - Our World: Introducing Human Geography (3)

A geographical introduction to how humans shape our world, with attention also given to how it shapes us. Themes may include: culture, economic activities, environmental change, globalization, politics, population, resources, and urbanization. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nicholas Blomley
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
SWH 10081, Burnaby
D200 Gretchen Ferguson
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SUR 5240, Surrey
GEOG 102 - World Problems in Geographic Perspective (3)

Current world-scale problems are examined in their regional and global contexts, with emphasis being placed on the importance of dynamics of the natural environment in human affairs. Breadth-Social Sciences.

REM 100 - Global Change (3)

This course provides students with an overview of global environmental change and its causes from a social science perspective, historically and at the present time. Population growth, an increasing ecological footprint and changes in ideology, social organization, economy and technology will be critically reviewed. New ways of thinking in natural and social science will be considered in relation to specific issues such as land, soil and food; energy, raw materials and solid waste; air pollution and transportation; water, oceans and fisheries; climate change; forestry and biodiversity; urbanization, and alternative futures. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Pascal Haegeli
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 3520, Burnaby
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
D101
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D102
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
D103
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D104
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D105
Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
D106
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 2104, Burnaby
D107
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 11911, Burnaby
D108
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D109
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 7101, Burnaby
D110
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby

and two of*

BUS 449 - Ethical Issues in Marketing (3)

A critical examination of topics such as consumerism, marketing ethics, and social responsibility, efficiency of marketing or ecological marketing. The particular emphasis may vary depending on the interests of the class and instructor. Prerequisite: BUS 343, 360W; 60 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Christine Pitt
Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
SUR 5360, Surrey
BUS 453 - Sustainable Innovation (3)

Challenges associated with continuing innovation are examined and students work to generate innovative solutions by challenging existing economic models. Students learn about sustainable opportunity, recognition, and screening, and understand how great ideas to 'save the plant' can get off the ground. Prerequisite: BUS 360W (or another upper division Writing (W) course); 60units. Recommended: BUS 338. Students with credit for BUS 494 when offered as Sustainable Innovation may not complete this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Timothy Ames
Fr 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 3250, Surrey
D700
Tu 8:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2220, Burnaby
D800 Jeremy Stone
TBD
BUS 475 - Sustainable Operations (3)

Examines key challenges and opportunities organizations face in integrating sustainable business practices within corporate strategy. Identifies organizational capabilities needed to support existing sustainable commitments and strategies to allow for innovation. Prerequisite: BUS 360W; 90 units. Students with credit for BUS 49X Selected Topics (Sustainable Operations) may not take this course for further credit.

BUS 489 - Management Practices for Sustainability (3)

Businesses are realigning and in some cases, reinventing their organizations toward more sustainable business models. Management systems and initiatives will be examined that enable organizations to reduce their firms' negative environmental and social impacts while, in many cases, increasing profits and competitive advantage. Prerequisite: BUS 360W and 374; 60 units. Students who have taken BUS 457 cannot take this course for further credit.

*Registration in upper division Business Administration courses required for this certificate are open only to approved BBA students or Faculty of Environment students who are enrolled in this certificate.

and a minimum of two of**

ARCH 386 - Archaeological Resource Management (3)

Surveys the origins, implementations, and need for archaeological heritage legislation on an international and national scale. Topical issues associated with contract archaeology, public archaeology, native heritage, and avocational societies are incorporated. Prerequisite: ARCH 201.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Bob Muir
We 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 6136, Burnaby
CMNS 349 - Environment, Media and Communication (4)

An examination of how media, culture and communication shape public opinion and behaviour about environmental issues such as global warming, (un)sustainable resource use and pollution, with special attention to the impact of practices such as advertising, public relations, science and risk communication, journalism and advocacy communication upon public discourse about the environment, and the role of dialogue and deliberation in mediating and resolving conflict over environmental issues. Prerequisite: 60 units, including at least one upper division course in CMNS, DIAL, EVSC, GEOG or BlSC. Students with credit for CMNS 388 (in Summer 2010, Spring 2011, or Summer 2012) may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Shane Gunster
Mo 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
HCC 1800, Vancouver
E101
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
HCC 2235, Vancouver
E102
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
HCC 2235, Vancouver
E103
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
HCC 2235, Vancouver
J100 Shane Gunster
Mo 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
HCC 1800, Vancouver
J101
Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
HCC 2205, Vancouver
J102
Mo 8:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 2205, Vancouver
ENSC 412 - Technologies, Cultures and a Sustainable World (3)

Technology issues relevant to global sustainable development are considered from engineering, historical and anthropological perspectives. Topics include hydroelectric dams, alternative power generation systems, and the science of climate change. In-depth case studies emphasize interdisciplinary exploration of these themes. Students wishing B-Soc credit should take ENV 412. Prerequisite: Minimum 60 credit hours. Students may take only one of ENSC 412 and ENV 412 for credit. Breadth-Science.

or ENV 412 - Technologies, Cultures and a Sustainable World (3)

Technology issues relevant to global sustainable development are considered from engineering, historical and anthropological perspectives. Topics include hydroelectric dams, alternative power generation systems, and the science of climate change. In-depth case studies emphasize interdisciplinary exploration of these themes. Students wishing B-Sci credit should take ENSC 412. Prerequisite: Minimum 60 credit hours. Students may take only one of ENSC 412 and ENV 412 for credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

ENV 222 - Environmental Controversy: An interdisciplinary study of environmental issues (3)

Through lecture, field experiences, guest presentations and group projects, students will explore the complexity within a number of key environmental controversies, exploring its scientific, social, cultural, ethical, legal and personal aspects. Prerequisite: One of the following: ARCH 100, EVSC 100, GEOG 102, GEOG 111, REM 100 or REM 200 and completion of 24 units. Students who have received credit for ENV 399 (Environmental Controversy) cannot receive credit for ENV 222. Breadth-Social Sci/Science.

ENV 321 - Ecological Economics (4)

Introduces students to the concepts and methods of ecological economics. Provides students with grounding in the core principles of conventional economics applied to the environment but then extends this to the integration of economics and ecology to create a new ecological-economic understanding of environmental change and sustainability. Prerequisite: Minimum of 45 units. Students with credit for REM 321 cannot take ENV 321 for further credit.

GEOG 221 - Economic Geography (3)

The basic concepts of economic geography, involving consideration of the spatial organization and development of economic and resource based systems. Prerequisite: GEOG 100. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rosemary-Claire Collard
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SECB 1014, Burnaby
D101
Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D102
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
D103
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
GEOG 321 - Geographies of Global Capitalism (4)

Examines the historical development, spatial organization, and social impact of market function, firm structure and operation, economic policy, and regulation and deregulation at various scales from local to global, from a geographical perspective. Prerequisite: GEOG 221. Students who received credit for GEOG 321 (STT), Contemporary Capitalism, in Spring 2010, may not take this course for further credit.

GEOG 322 - World Resources (4)

An analysis of the use and development of natural resources from a geographic, economic and institutional perspective. Prerequisite: At least 30 units including GEOG 221. Students with credit for GEOG 322W may not take this course for further credit.

or GEOG 322W - World Resources (4)

An analysis of the use and development of natural resources from a geographic, economic and institutional perspective. Prerequisite: At least 30 units including GEOG 221. Students with credit for GEOG 322 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Alex Clapp
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCC 9000, Burnaby
D101
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D102
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
GEOG 323 - Industrial Location (4)

An examination of the factors affecting industrial location and the geographic organization of production systems within and among firms from the perspectives of national, regional and urban development. Prerequisite: GEOG 221.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Patrick Brouder
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 10901, Burnaby
D101
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D102
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 11901, Burnaby
GEOG 325 - Geographies of Consumption (4)

Spaces, places, landscapes, and scales of consumption emphasizing commodity cultures, marketing, retail, ideology, subjectivity, objects, technology, and tourism. Prerequisite: GEOG 221 or 261.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Paul Kingsbury
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCC 9000, Burnaby
D101
Th 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D102
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D103
Fr 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
D104
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
PHYS 346 - Energy and the Environment (3)

The physical principles and limitations of renewable energy source utilization and energy conversion. A quantitative introduction to energy conversion and storage systems, including solar power and heating; wind, tidal, geothermal, hydroelectric and nuclear power, hydrogen technology, electrical and mechanical energy storage. Prerequisite: CHEM 120 or 121; PHYS 102 or 121 or 126 or 141; and MATH 155 or 152, with a minimum grade of C-. Quantitative.

POL 452W - Energy Policy (4)

Examines the politics and policies of energy, including historical and technical perspectives. Topics include alternative energy, climate change, regulatory policy, and the economics of energy, as well as practical case studies. Students who have completed POL 459 in 2009 and 2010 may not complete this course for further credit. Writing.

REM 350 - Sustainable Energy and Materials Management (4)

Takes an interdisciplinary approach to sustainable management of society's energy and materials flows. Topics range from thermodynamics and estimates of global resources to market-based policies and governance Institutions. Peak oil, renewable energy and carbon capture and storage are also discussed. The role for green consumerism in light of climate challenge are highlighted. Prerequisite: 45 credit hours.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mark Jaccard
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
SWH 10081, Burnaby
D101
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D102
Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D103
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 4115, Burnaby
D104
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D105
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
D106
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D107
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D108
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D109
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D110
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D111
Tu 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D112
Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
REM 356 - Institutional Arrangements for Sustainable Environmental Management (3)

This course provides an overview of some basic legislation, agencies, and policies which currently are in use to regulate the natural environment at the international, nation, provincial, regional, and local levels. Its purpose is to present a basic set of evaluative questions which can be used to address the effectiveness and efficiency of the environmental regulatory and management systems currently in use. Prerequisite: REM 100.

REM 412 - Environmental Modeling (3)

Students receive hands-on experience in the construction and analysis of computer simulation models of environmental and ecological systems and problems. Prerequisite: REM 100 or EVSC 100; BISC 204 or GEOG 215; STAT 101 or 201 or 203 or 270 or equivalent; 60 units. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Steve Conrad
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
BLU 10011, Burnaby
D101
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 3148.1, Burnaby
D102
Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 3148.1, Burnaby
D103
Mo 9:30 AM – 10:30 AM
AQ 3148.1, Burnaby
SD 201 - Introduction to Development and Sustainability (3)

A critical introduction to various approaches to development and sustainability. Examines the impacts of major drivers of environmental change caused by development processes, and offers selected case studies from around the world illustrating policy and practical challenges to implementing sustainable development measures at various scales. Students with credit for DEVS 201 cannot take SD 201 for further credit.

SD 281 - Introduction to Sustainable Community Development (3)

First required course for the SCD Certificate. Builds an understanding of strengths and weaknesses of conventional approaches to development; rationale for alternative approaches; varying interpretations of community and of development; and essential components for creating local economic development strategies. Sustainable Community Development is introduced as a framework to meet current social and economic needs while ensuring adequate resources are available for future generations. Prerequisite: 30 units or SCD Certificate program approval or permission of the Director of the Sustainable Development Program. Not permitted for credit toward the SCD Post Baccalaureate Diploma. Corequisite: Students may not complete this course concurrently with upper division SD courses. Students with credit for SCD 201 or REM 201 or REM 281 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
or REM 281 - Introduction to Sustainable Community Development (3)

Builds an understanding of strengths and weaknesses of conventional approaches to development; rationale for alternative approaches; varying interpretations of community and of development; and essential components for creating local economic development strategies. Sustainable community development is introduced as a framework to meet current social and economic needs while ensuring adequate resources are available for future generations. Prerequisite: 30 units. Not permitted for credit toward the Sustainable Community Development Post Baccalaureate Diploma. Students with credit for SCD 201 or REM 201 or SD 281 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

SD 381 - Sustainable Community Development Theory and Practice (4)

A theoretical foundation for understanding sustainable development at the community level, including an integrated approach to environmental, economic, and social aspects of development. Emphasizes economic and policy instruments, and planning tools, for engaging in and implementing SCD. Prerequisite: SCD certificate program approval and SCD 201 or REM 201 or REM 281 or SD 281 or SCD diploma program approval or completion of 60 units or permission of the Director of the Sustainable Development Program. Students with credit for SCD 301 or REM 301 or REM 381 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
or REM 381 - Sustainable Community Development Theory and Practice (4)

A theoretical foundation for understanding sustainable development at the community level, including an integrated approach to the environmental, economic, and social aspects of development. Emphasizes economic and policy instruments, and planning tools, for engaging in and implementing SCD. Prerequisite: SCD 201 or REM 201 or REM 281 or SD 281 or completion of 60 units. Students with credit for SCD 301 or REM 301 or SD 381 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

SD 401 - Issues, Concepts and Cases in Development and Sustainability (4)

An in-depth critical examination of contemporary challenges to effective governance for sustainable development within the context of global north-south relations. Assesses the prospects for sustainable solutions in relation to selected problem-solving thematic areas and case studies at various scales involving student-led dialogues. Prerequisite: 60 units. Students with credit for DEVS 401 or ENV 401 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100
We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5039, Burnaby

**Substitutions with appropriate course content may be possible with permission from the Beedie School of Business.

and completion of a minimum of one of the following approved experiential or service learning components

  • co-operative education work term focused on areas related to corporate environmental and social sustainability
  • 25 hours minimum of voluntary or salaried work within a social enterprise, charitable organization, company, corporation, or non-profit organization in a role related to corporate environmental and social sustainability
  • 25 hours minimum as a research assistant for a professor focusing on areas related to corporate environmental and social sustainability
  • 25 hours minimum in other Business Faculty-approved activity areas related to corporate environmental and social sustainability

Before beginning this requirement, it is recommended that students seek prior approval from the Beedie School of Business' Academic Director - Business Major by submitting a detailed outline of their activity.

Upon completion of the experiential component, students will submit to the Academic Director - Business Major.

  • a description (written by either the student or the organization) of the organization and the student's role in the organization, signed and validated by the employer/supervisor
  • a reflective 500 word essay about the student's work/volunteer experience that identifies key corporate environmental and social sustainability experiences and how that influenced their current thinking about the implications of business practice on society and the environment. The essay will be graded pass/fail.