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To view the Fall 2017 Academic Calendar go to http://www.sfu.ca/students/calendar/2017/fall.html

Sustainable Development Program | Faculty of Environment Simon Fraser University Calendar | Spring 2018

Development and Sustainability Minor

This minor program explores various aspects of sustainability that arise from the complex relationship between development and the environment, including discussion of practice and policy issues in relation to problem-solving and examination of thematic areas at various scales (from local to global) that enhance the quality of life.

Program entry is on a competitive basis and requires completion of 30 lower division units. A 2.75 cumulative grade point average (CGPA) is required. Students must also be in good standing in their major program's home department.

Lower Division Requirements

Students complete

SD 201 - Introduction to Development and Sustainability (3)

A critical introduction to various approaches to development and sustainability. Examines the impacts of major drivers of environmental change caused by development processes, and offers selected case studies from around the world illustrating policy and practical challenges to implementing sustainable development measures at various scales. Students with credit for DEVS 201 cannot take SD 201 for further credit.

Upper Division Requirements

Students complete a total of 16 units including

SD 401 - Issues, Concepts and Cases in Development and Sustainability (4)

An in-depth critical examination of contemporary challenges to effective governance for sustainable development within the context of global north-south relations. Assesses the prospects for sustainable solutions in relation to selected problem-solving thematic areas and case studies at various scales involving student-led dialogues. Prerequisite: 60 units. Students with credit for DEVS 401 or ENV 401 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100
We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5039, Burnaby

and the remaining 12 units chosen from the following which must include at least two courses from outside the student's home unit (department, school, or faculty).

Archaeology

ARCH 365 - Archaeological Perspectives on Human Ecology (3)

Examines methods, theories, and concepts for understanding how past cultures interacted with their bio-physical surroundings. Integrates diverse kinds of data and knowledge to understand these relationships. Topics to be addressed include local and traditional ecological knowledge, paleoenvironmental reconstruction, human-environment interaction, human-induced environmental changes, paleodiet, and domestication. Prerequisite: ARCH 201; or any two of ARCH 100, REM 100, GEOG 100, EVSC 100; and 45 credits.

ARCH 377 - Historical Archaeology (5)

An introduction to theory and method in North American historical archaeology. Laboratory instruction is provided in historic artifact analysis and interpretation. Prerequisite: ARCH 201 and one lower division ARCH course.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ross Jamieson
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SWH 9152, Burnaby
D101 Ross Jamieson
Mo 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 9084, Burnaby
D102 Ross Jamieson
Fr 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 9084, Burnaby
OP1 Ross Jamieson
TBD
ARCH 385 - Paleoanthropology (5)

The relationship between culture and biology in prehistoric human evolution. The recognition and critical evaluation of the significance of the similarities and differences among fossil human types. Prerequisite: ARCH 131 and 272/272W.

ARCH 386 - Archaeological Resource Management (3)

Surveys the origins, implementations, and need for archaeological heritage legislation on an international and national scale. Topical issues associated with contract archaeology, public archaeology, native heritage, and avocational societies are incorporated. Prerequisite: ARCH 201.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Bob Muir
We 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 6136, Burnaby

Communication

CMNS 342 - Science and Public Policy: Risk Communication (4)

The course examines communication in the relation between science (technology) and public policy, and more particularly, in the evaluation of risk. Prerequisite: Two of CMNS 260, 261, or 262.

CMNS 346 - Development Communication (4)

An introduction to different ways of thinking about the role that communication plays in development including both historical and contemporary thought. The course will explore the nature and causes of unequal opportunities for economic growth, human security, environmental sustainability and social resilience, focusing on the contributions of the information economy and knowledge society. It provides a workshop for development and communication practices. Prerequisite: 60 units including CMNS 240 or 247. Students with credit for CMNS 345 may not complete this course for further credit.

CMNS 347 - Communication in Conflict and Intervention (4)

The role of communication, and in particular the mass media, in various types of conflict and the uses of communication-based strategies in the intervention, arbitration and mediation of those conflicts. Prerequisite: 60 units including CMNS 110 and 130. Recommended: CMNS 247 and 362.

CMNS 356 - Communication to Mitigate Disasters (4)

An introduction to the special role communication and information systems play in efforts to mitigate effects of major emergencies and disasters. Topics include: Canadian and international disaster management programs, practices and issues; principles of emergency communication planning and operation, and the application and influence of new communication and information technologies (including electronic networks) in hazard information gathering, interpretation, exchange and management. Prerequisite: 60 units, including two of CMNS 230, 240, and 253 (or 253W). Students with credit for CMNS 456 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Peter Anderson
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 3210, Burnaby
D102
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCK 8660, Burnaby
D103
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SSCK 8660, Burnaby
D104
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCK 8660, Burnaby
CMNS 388 - Special Topics in Communication (4)

Intensive analysis of a particular topic in the general area of communication. This course can be repeated for credit up to a maximum of three times, if topic studied is different. Prerequisite: Depends on topic; published before enrollment.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Milena Droumeva
Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
HCC 1900, Vancouver
D101
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
HCC 2205, Vancouver
D102
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
HCC 2205, Vancouver
D103
Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
HCC 2290, Vancouver
D105
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
HCC 2290, Vancouver
CMNS 425 - Applied Communication for Social Issues (4)

An advanced seminar in applied communication that focuses on the research and strategic design of media messages, campaigns and programs for public awareness, education, and social change. This course involves the application of theories and approaches in critical media analysis to the tasks of media design and media use for public understanding, engagement and participation around social issues. Prerequisite: 75 units, including CMNS 221; and one of CMNS 260, 261 or 262.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Martin Laba
Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
HCC 1425, Vancouver
CMNS 426 - Video Design for Social Communication (4)

This workshop examines the growing role that video is playing in a variety of public relations, industrial, advocacy and educational contexts. The emphasis of this course is on issues of communication design in relation to the goals and values in specific communication forums. Prerequisite: 75 units, including CMNS 226 and two of CMNS 220, 326, 358.

CMNS 444 - Political Economy of International Communication (4)

An examination of the domestic and international implications of the development of mass media and telecommunications and the differential impact of the free flow of technology and information. Prerequisite: 75 units, including CMNS 240 or 247, and CMNS 346 or 348.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Anis Rahman
Tu 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 2510, Vancouver
CMNS 446 - Communication, Science and Technology (4)

Explores the relationship between power, politics, and science; investigates stakeholders such as scientists, entrepreneurs, technologists, activists, policy-makers and their world-wide institutional contexts; compares global flows of science and technology through governmental, non-government, and transnational organizations; examines representations of science and technology in media systems and international development programs. Prerequisite: 75 units, including CMNS 346; and one of CMNS 260, 261 or 262. Recommended: CMNS 253 (or 253W) and 362.

CMNS 447 - Negotiation and Dialogue as Communication (4)

This course provides frameworks and tools with which to understand and evaluate negotiation as a form of communication. The objective of the course is to provide an understanding of the role of communication in the negotiating process, and the consequences of different kinds of negotiation strategies in intercultural, international, competitive, and conflictual situations. It combines theoretical discussion with practical case studies, involves guest negotiators and analysts, and provides an appreciation of the world-wide scale and importance of negotiation as a basis for clarifying relationships. Prerequisite: 75 units, including CMNS 347, and at least one other CMNS or DIAL upper division course.

Economics

ECON 355W - Economic Development (4)

Analysis of theories of economic development. Consideration will be given to the requirements of successful development, to aspects of international co-operation, and to procedures of economic planning. Problems of emerging countries and models of various developing economies will be studied. Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205; 60 units. Students with credit for ECON 355 or ECON 455 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 M EMRUL HASAN
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 9002, Burnaby
D101
Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
WMC 2523, Burnaby
D102
Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 2523, Burnaby
D103
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
WMC 2523, Burnaby
D104
We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D105
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D106
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D107
Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D108
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D109
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D110
Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
D111
We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D112
Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5015, Burnaby

Education

EDUC 311 - Foundations in Aboriginal Education, Language, and Culture (3)

An introduction to Aboriginal education in Canada and BC. There will be a critical examination of historical and contemporary issues in education and an exploration of culturally based Aboriginal education grounded in Aboriginal philosophies. Prerequisite: 60 units. Breadth-Humanities.

EDUC 370 - International and Intercultural Education (4)

Practical and theoretical approaches to international and intercultural education, including examinations of the relationships between culture, learning and schooling, and contemporary issues in teacher education from an international perspective. Prerequisite: Completion of at least 60 units, including 3 units in Education.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kumari Beck
Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 2220, Burnaby
EDUC 435 - Infusing Global Perspectives into Curriculum (4)

An examination of the rationale for and concepts of global education including its content, methods and skills objectives, and its place in existing provincial curricula. Prerequisite: 60 units, including three of which must be in Education.

EDUC 441 - Multicultural and Anti-racist Education (4)

Focuses on developing approaches for multicultural and anti-racist teaching. Topics include: diversity of race, language and culture among learners; identifying the operation of racism, prejudice and discrimination in classrooms and schools; becoming familiar with a variety of approaches such as: co-operative learning, culturally appropriate assessment, and community involvement to counteract and prevent negative classroom and school dynamics; identifying bias in curriculum resources; and locating entry points in selected curriculum areas (e.g. language arts, social studies, art, music, etc.) for integrating approaches which employ a range of multicultural/anti-racist curriculum resources. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402 or corequisite EDUC 403. Students with credit for EDUC 382: Diversity in Education: Theories, Policies, Practices may not take this course for further credit.

EDUC 452 - Environmental Education (8)

Examines the educational problems entailed in developing human awareness and understanding of the environment. Explores environmental issues through a multi-disciplinary approach and relates historical and contemporary problems in human-environment interactions to school curricula from the elementary to the secondary level. Includes a laboratory component. Grading will be on a pass/fail basis. A $147.86 field activity fee will be levied in this course. Normally offered in summer session only. Prerequisite: EDUC 401W/402W or corequisite EDUC 403. Students may be required to successfully complete a Criminal Record Check. Students with credit for EDUC 454 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

First Nations Studies

FNST 332 - Ethnobotany of British Columbia First Nations (3)

This course is an introduction to the study of plant knowledge and use by First Nations peoples in British Columbia. It provides students with information about the role of plants in First Nations' cultures including such areas as foods, medicines, technology, ceremony, ecological indicators, and within First Nations' knowledge and classification systems. Special focus may be placed on the ethnobotany of one or more Aboriginal groups or culture areas. Prerequisite: FNST 101. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Robert Bandringa
Fr 10:30 AM – 1:20 PM
SWH 9095, Burnaby
FNST 383 - Indigenous Technology: Art and Sustainability (4)

Examines various art forms and aesthetic expressions of select Indigenous peoples of the Americas. Reviews techniques and protocols for the gathering and preparation of materials and the use of ethnographic materials, and provides learning through hands-on practice. Prerequisite: 45 units and permission of instructor; no previous artistic training and/or experience is required. Students with credit for FNST 322 under the topic 'Indigenous Expressive Arts' with a focus in crafts may not take this course for further credit.

FNST 401 - Aboriginal Peoples and Public Policy (3)

An examination of First Nations and Aboriginal peoples' perspectives on political, social and legal issues involving their rights as first citizens of Canada and North America, and the practical and political relations with various levels of government. Issues examined include: Aboriginal rights and title questions, self government models and concepts, constitutional matters, the impact of federal government policies, including their impact on women's lives, and Aboriginal community and First Nations politics. Prerequisite: FNST 101 and 201W. Recommended: POL 221.

FNST 403 - Indigenous Knowledge in the Modern World (3)

This course explores the subject of traditional Indigenous knowledge and its contemporary implications for First Nations programs in such areas as economic development, ecotourism, spiritualism, language retention, biodiversity, ethnoscience, environmentalism, and heritage conservation. First Nations perspectives on patents, copyrights, and other creative products from traditional culture will also be examined through lecture, guest speakers and seminar presentation. Prerequisite: FNST 101 or FNST 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
J200
Tu 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
HCC 3122, Vancouver
FNST 433 - Indigenous Environmental Justice and Activism (4)

Examines contemporary writings regarding Indigenous environmental logic and environmental concerns of contemporary times. Studies effects of resource extraction upon Indigenous nations, globalization, genetic modifications, health, intellectual property, spiritual beliefs, culture and society, art and language and compares these with specific Indigenous logic at the time of contact. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Geography

GEOG 322 - World Resources (4)

An analysis of the use and development of natural resources from a geographic, economic and institutional perspective. Prerequisite: At least 30 units including GEOG 221. Students with credit for GEOG 322W may not take this course for further credit.

GEOG 323 - Industrial Location (4)

An examination of the factors affecting industrial location and the geographic organization of production systems within and among firms from the perspectives of national, regional and urban development. Prerequisite: GEOG 221.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Patrick Brouder
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 10901, Burnaby
D101
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D102
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 11901, Burnaby
GEOG 324 - Geography of Transportation (4)

An empirical and theoretical examination of the geographical aspects of transportation systems. Prerequisite: GEOG 221 or 241.

GEOG 325 - Geographies of Consumption (4)

Spaces, places, landscapes, and scales of consumption emphasizing commodity cultures, marketing, retail, ideology, subjectivity, objects, technology, and tourism. Prerequisite: GEOG 221 or 261.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Paul Kingsbury
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCC 9000, Burnaby
D101
Th 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D102
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D103
Fr 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
D104
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
GEOG 327 - Geography of Tourism (4)

Factors underlying the changing geography of tourism. Issues of demand, supply and impact are examined. Prerequisite: GEOG 221 or 241, or permission of the instructor.

GEOG 382 - Population Geography (4)

A survey - from geographic perspective - of data, concepts, themes, and debates in the study of population. Particular concern for population numbers, fertility, mortality, and migration over space and time. Prerequisite: GEOG 221 or 241.

GEOG 383 - Regional Development and Planning (4)

Theories and concepts of regional development and planning in the advanced capitalist and third worlds; methods of spatial analysis. Prerequisite: GEOG 221 and GEOG 241.

GEOG 389W - Nature and Society (4)

Examines the relationship between nature and society, covering the dominant geographical approaches to human-environment interaction, and their social, spatial, and political economic effects. Prerequisite: GEOG 221 or GEOG 241 (Students who received credit for EVSC 200 before 2011 may use it to meet the prerequisite requirement for this course). Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 John Pierce
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 4150, Burnaby
D101
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5020, Burnaby
D102
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2533, Burnaby
D103
We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2260, Burnaby

Health Sciences

HSCI 308 - Sickness and Wealth: Health in Global Perspective (3)

New formations of wealth and power that contribute to international health disparities and consideration of the relations of power both between and within nation-states that make some people sick and keep others well. Economic and political collusions that make people sick. Infectious disease and child survival, health implications of war, biotech, and the politics of food and water. Prerequisite: 45 units. Recommended: HSCI 130.

HSCI 340 - Social Determinants of Health (3)

Social determinants of health and health inequities. Explores how and why the social advantages and disadvantages that people experience - based on their social position(s) and social circumstances - determine their health status and overall well-being. Prerequisite: 60 units and two HSCI 200-level courses, one of which may be taken concurrently.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Maya Gislason
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCK 9500, Burnaby
HSCI 406 - Global Perspectives in Indigenous Health (3)

Examination of the health and health problems of Indigenous peoples from a global perspective. Comparative study of social and historical factors affecting Indigenous peoples that contribute to health conditions and health status. Efforts of Indigenous peoples to restore health to their Nations. Prerequisite: 60 units and completion of HSCI 305 and either HSCI 340 or HSCI 319W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100
Th 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
SSCC 9000, Burnaby
HSCI 412 - Health Communication (3)

Theory and strategies for health communication in health systems and in particular cultural contexts. Interpersonal communication in health care, the relationship between belief and the construction of clinical realities, and communication for promoting public health. Social marketing and other strategies for health promotion targeting communities and persons of diverse cultural backgrounds. Communication about environmental and health risks. Prerequisite: HSCI 312 and two HSCI 200-level courses. Students with credit for HSCI 301 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Susan Baxter
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5016, Burnaby
HSCI 431 - The Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic (3)

A multidisciplinary and international focus on the transmission, impact, prevention, and human aspects of the global HIV/AIDS epidemic. Prerequisite: 60 units including either HSCI 212 or 330.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kate Salters
Th 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
AQ 3159, Burnaby

History

HIST 322 - Atlantic and Pacific Migration (4)

Topics in the history of Atlantic and Pacific migrations to the Americas with attention given to the contexts from which the migrants came, why they migrated, and how they adjusted. Examples may be taken from the United States, Canada and Latin America. Prerequisite: 45 units, including six units of lower division history.

HIST 363 - History of Technology (4)

Examines technology from ancient tool use, through the place of invention in the development of civilization. Prerequisite: 45 units, including six units of lower division history. Recommended: HIST 130.

HIST 377 - Environmental History (4)

Examines the reciprocal influences between humans and nature through time. Topics may include settlement, agriculture, technology, politics, urbanization, science, and conservation. Prerequisite: 45 units, including six units of lower division history. Students with credit for GEOG 377 may not take this course for further credit.

HIST 427 - Problems in the History of Aboriginal Peoples (4)

Examination of selected themes in the history of Aboriginal peoples. Content may vary from offering to offering; see course outline for further information. HIST 427 may be repeated for credit only when a different topic is taught. Prerequisite: 45 units including nine units of lower division history.

HIST 432 - Problems in Environmental History (4)

An investigation into the major themes and arguments in the environmental histories of North America, emphasizing how different individuals and groups have used, perceived, and managed their environments over time. Content may vary from offering to offering; see course outline for further information. HIST 432 may be repeated for credit only when a different topic is taught. Prerequisite: 45 units including nine units of lower division history. Students with credit for GEOG 432 may take HIST 432 for credit only when a different topic is taught.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Christina Adcock
We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 2501, Burnaby
HIST 458W - Problems in Latin American Regional History (4)

Advanced concepts and methodology applied to the study of one or more Latin American regions. Examples are: pre-Columbian and colonial Middle America; revolutionary Mexico 1910-1970, Brazil from Slavery to Militarism, frontier society to hyper-urbanism in the La Plata countries. Content may vary from offering to offering; see course outline for further information. HIST 458W may be repeated for credit only when a different topic is taught. Prerequisite: 45 units including nine units of lower division history. Recommended: one of HIST 104, 208, 209W. Writing.

HIST 459W - Problems in the Political and Social History of Latin America (4)

Advanced concepts and methodology applied to the study of traditional and contemporary institutions (the church, the great estate, the peasantry, elite structures) and/or political movements (agrarian revolution, populism, the modernizing military). Emphasis placed on changing historiographical interpretations. Content may vary from offering to offering; see course outline for further information. HIST 459W may be repeated for credit only when a different topic is taught. Prerequisite: 45 units including nine units of lower division history. Recommended: one of HIST 104, 208, 209W. Writing.

Humanities

HUM 325 - The Humanities and the Natural World (4)

A study of the humanistic, scientific, political, and ideological discourses deriving from concern with the natural environment. Using classic and contemporary sources, this course examines the interaction of humans with the non-human world, and includes such topics as human communities and nature, the immersion of the individual in nature, nature and the human habitat. Prerequisite: 45 units. Breadth-Humanities.

International Studies

IS 313W - Nationalism, Democracy and Development in Modern India (4)

An examination of the differing narratives of nation and modernity in the struggle for independence from colonial rule in India, and their implications for the post-colonial state, for politics and for India's economic development. Prerequisite: IS 210 or 220, and 45 units. Writing.

IS 314 - National, Regional, and International Politics in Southeast Asia (4)

Provides an overview of national and political issues in Southeast Asia. Surveying politics in individual countries and regional political institutions, focus is given to particular themes such as democratization and civil society, communism and other forms of authoritarianism, the role of the military, decentralization, religion and politics, the impact of China on the region, and security concerns. Prerequisite: 45 units.

IS 409 - Special Topics I (4)

Specific details of courses to be offered will be published prior to enrolment each term. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Paul Meyer
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
HCC 2235, Vancouver
HCC 1505, Vancouver
IS 410 - Politics, Institutions and Development (4)

The quality of institutions' exercises a crucial influence on the prospects for development. Aims are to interrogate this claim through analysis of different paths of economic growth and change across the developing world. Examination of the ways in which politics influences economic growth and distribution; the relationships between political systems and patterns of development; and the politics of institutions and state formation. Prerequisite: 90 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Leslie Armijo
Th 8:30 AM – 12:20 PM
HCC 2235, Vancouver
IS 429 - Special Topics III (4)

Specific details of courses to be offered will be published prior to enrolment each term. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D400 Brenda Lyshaug
We 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 2280, Vancouver

Political Science

POL 342 - Developing Countries in Global Politics (4)

Problems arising from the disparities in power and wealth between the highly industrialized countries of Europe and North America, and the under-industrialized countries of Asia, Africa and Latin America. Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department.

POL 343 - Global Political Economy (4)

An introduction to the study of the international political economy, with an emphasis on the interaction between the state and markets, and the basic political-institutional relationships of trade, money and finance, international investment, foreign debt and foreign aid. Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kevin Ginnell
Fr 9:30 AM – 1:20 PM
AQ 4120, Burnaby
POL 346 - International Organization (4)

An examination of the structures and processes and the main substantive decisions of the United Nations and related international organizations. Based upon in-depth study of the UN Charter, the Security Council, General Assembly, Secretary-general and Secretariat and their constitutional and political interactions since 1945, with special attention to the theory and practice of international organization advanced by the principal Western countries, the Soviet Union and Soviet bloc, the People's Republic of China and leading Third World countries. Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 James Busumtwi-sam
Th 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
BLU 10021, Burnaby
D101
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 6125, Burnaby
POL 373 - Human Security (4)

Explores what is involved in shifting the focus in the security realm from 'national interest' to the safety and needs of humans. Addresses several contemporary issues of human insecurity such as genocide, terrorism, civil wars and other complex emergencies; the political economy of conflict (small arms, "blood" diamonds); 'new' inequalities (economic, gender, class, ethnicity); and new health risks (e.g. HIV/AIDS, SARS, ecological degradation). Considers recent initiatives and trends that have emerged to deal with these issues (e.g. humanitarian intervention, International Criminal Court, new coalitions of state and non-state actors such as the Ottawa Process on anti-personnel mines). Prerequisite: Six lower division units in Political Science or permission of the department. Students with credit for POL 349 'Special Topics' for credit under this title may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
J100 Denis Dogah
Sa 9:30 AM – 1:20 PM
HCC 1325, Vancouver
POL 374 - Africa in the Global Political Economy (4)

Considers Africa in the historical development of the modern global political economy, from the transatlantic slave trade to the present. Examines contemporary issues associated with Africa in the neo-liberal world order and the politics of resistance and alternative pathways or models of development. Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department.

POL 446W - International Relations in East Asia (4)

An overview and analysis of international relations in East Asia. Prerequisite: Eight upper division units in political science or permission of the department. Writing.

POL 447 - Theories of Global Political Economy (4)

An examination of the major theories of international political economy, and their application to such issues as the politics of trade, aid, monetary relations, and transnational corporations. Prerequisite: Eight upper division units in political science or permission of the department.

Resource and Environmental Management

REM 356 - Institutional Arrangements for Sustainable Environmental Management (3)

This course provides an overview of some basic legislation, agencies, and policies which currently are in use to regulate the natural environment at the international, nation, provincial, regional, and local levels. Its purpose is to present a basic set of evaluative questions which can be used to address the effectiveness and efficiency of the environmental regulatory and management systems currently in use. Prerequisite: REM 100.

Sociology and Anthropology

SA 302W - Global Problems and the Culture of Capitalism (SA) (4)

An introduction to the political economy and culture of capitalism in relation to global problems. Case studies may focus on issues of population, famine, disease, poverty, environmental destruction, social inequality, and nation-state violence. Resistance, rebellion and social movements in response to these problems also will be addressed. Students who took SA 294 in 03-1, 04-1 and 04-2 may not take SA 302 for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Social Sci.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ataman Avdan
Fr 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SECB 1010, Burnaby
J100 Deborah Dergousoff
Mo 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
SUR 2985, Surrey
SA 316 - Tourism and Social Policy (SA) (4)

An examination of tourism from the perspectives of sociology and anthropology, focusing primarily upon the social and cultural impacts of tourism and the social policy implications of tourism development in different societies. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201w.

SA 363 - Process of Development and Underdevelopment (SA) (4)

An examination of sociological and anthropological theories of development and underdevelopment as applied to the Third World. The nature and consequences of world system linkages; colonialism and decolonization; patterns of social change in selected societies and regions. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 371 - The Environment and Society (SA) (4)

An examination of environmental issues in their social context. Environmental issues are on the leading edge of contemporary public concern and public policy debates. This course will examine such issues as the relationship between social organization and mode of subsistence, the politics of hunger, and the way in which human societies in their particular social, historical, and cultural contexts view and interact with the natural world. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nicholas Scott
Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
HCC 2945, Vancouver
SA 396 - Selected Regional Areas (SA) (4)

An examination of selected aspects of social structure, culture and processes of social change in a specific regional area. The focus will vary from term to term. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 418 - International Health: Global Policies and Local Realities (A) (4)

An investigation of the social, cultural, and political issues that contribute to problems of ill-health in resource-poor countries and the major efforts in international public health to address these problems. It explores the application of knowledge about social, and especially gender relations in international health, with particular attention to local perspectives and grassroots initiatives. Institutional frameworks intended to promote health development are examined in historical and contemporary perspective through case studies on topics such as: malaria, population control, maternal health, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis. Prerequisite: 90 credit hours, which must include SA 101 or 150. Highly recommended: SA 218, 302W and 318. Breadth-Social Sciences.

SA 429 - Sex, Work, and International Capital (SA) (4)

Through a program of focused readings, films, and case studies, this course examines the experiences of women in the Third World in relation to the global economy and reorganization of states and cultures. The course challenges conventional ways of thinking about everyday life in households and workplaces, and emphasizes that issues which may seem specifically third World-based are shared by many around the world. An awareness of this commonality helps us assess the balance of structural constraints and opportunities, and stimulates a discussion on the organization of alternative ways of living. Prerequisite: A minimum of 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Students who took SA 463 in 2003 SA 460 in 2003 and SA 360 in 2004 may not take this course for further credit.

SA 430 - States, Cultures and Global Transitions (SA) (4)

Through a program of focused readings, case studies, and films, this course offers a new perspective on the study of globalization. It balances classical themes with contemporary approaches to global processes of economic, political, and cultural transformation. The course tackles such topics as the material aspects of cooperation and coercion, class relations in structures of capital accumulation and global governance, and cultural dynamics. Alternatives to Euro-American centrism are explored through the examples of citizenship, cultural politics, ethnic and religious conflicts, human rights, indigenous rights, and women's rights. Prerequisite: Minimum of 72 units including either SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Students with credit for SA 463 completed in 2004-3 may not complete this course for further credit.

Sustainable Community Development

SD 381 - Sustainable Community Development Theory and Practice (4)

A theoretical foundation for understanding sustainable development at the community level, including an integrated approach to environmental, economic, and social aspects of development. Emphasizes economic and policy instruments, and planning tools, for engaging in and implementing SCD. Prerequisite: SCD certificate program approval and SCD 201 or REM 201 or REM 281 or SD 281 or SCD diploma program approval or completion of 60 units or permission of the Director of the Sustainable Development Program. Students with credit for SCD 301 or REM 301 or REM 381 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
or REM 381 - Sustainable Community Development Theory and Practice (4)

A theoretical foundation for understanding sustainable development at the community level, including an integrated approach to the environmental, economic, and social aspects of development. Emphasizes economic and policy instruments, and planning tools, for engaging in and implementing SCD. Prerequisite: SCD 201 or REM 201 or REM 281 or SD 281 or completion of 60 units. Students with credit for SCD 301 or REM 301 or SD 381 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

SD 481 - Social Enterprise for Sustainable Community Development (4)

Third required course for the SCD Certificate. Introduction to the theory and practice of social enterprise within a SCD context, including the appropriate form of social enterprise for a particular purpose. Prerequisite: SD 381 or SCD 301 or REM 301 or REM 381, or permission of the Director of the Sustainable Development Program. Students with credit for SCD 401 or REM 401 or REM 481 may not complete this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E200 Jeremy Stone
Tu 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 1505, Vancouver
or REM 481 - Social Enterprise for Sustainable Community Development (4)

Introduction to the theory and practice of social enterprise within a SCD context, including the appropriate form of social enterprise for a particular purpose. Prerequisite: SD 381 or SCD 301 or REM 301 or REM 381. Students with credit for SCD 401 or REM 401 or SD 481 may not complete this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E200 Jeremy Stone
Tu 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 1505, Vancouver
SD 483 - Leadership in Sustainable Community Development (4)

Fourth required course for the SCD Certificate. Concerned with approaches SCD leaders require as agents of change, including: tackling complex community issues in addition to offering innovative tools for engaging others in meaningful collaboration processes. Prerequisite: SD 381 or SCD 301 or REM 301 or REM 381, or permission of the Director of the Sustainable Development Program. Students with credit for SCD 403 or REM 403 or REM 483 may not complete this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E200 Mark Roseland
Mo 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 2945, Vancouver
or REM 483 - Leadership in Sustainable Community Development (4)

Concerned with approaches that SCD leaders require as agents of change, including tackling complex community issues in addition to offering the innovative tools for engaging others in meaningful collaboration processes. Prerequisite: SD 381 or SCD 301 or REM 301 or REM 381. Students with credit for SCD 403 or REM 403 or SD 483 may not complete this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E200 Mark Roseland
Mo 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 2945, Vancouver