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Department of Economics Simon Fraser University Calendar | Spring 2018

Economics

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission Requirements

See Graduate General Regulation 1.3.4. Also required is a master of arts (MA) degree, with graduate work in core areas that are equivalent to ECON 802, 807, 835 and 836. Any core area deficiency must be filled by completing the appropriate course(s) in addition to the course work normally required. In certain cases, students may be transferred into the doctor of philosophy (PhD) program from the MA program after meeting MA core and unit requirements (16 courses beyond the BA honours is required for such a PhD program).

Degree Requirements

This program allows specialization in economics, economics and business administration, or economics and a related discipline. Normally, every PhD program will include the following.

1. Successful performance in 11 approved courses beyond the economics MA requirements listed above. Those specializing in economics must include

ECON 803 - Microeconomic Theory II (4)

The course subsequent to ECON 802 which covers advanced Microeconomic theory on a dynamic and general equilibrium basis. Prerequisite: ECON 802. Offered once a year.

ECON 804 - Advanced Topics in Microeconomic Theory (4)

The course following ECON 802 and 803 which covers such topics as equilibrium theory, axiomatic analysis, stability analysis, income distribution, dynamic micro models, and models of non-market economics. Prerequisite: ECON 802 and 803 or equivalent.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
G100 Chris Bidner
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
We 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
WMC 3611, Burnaby
WMC 3611, Burnaby
G101 Chris Bidner
Mo 7:30 PM – 8:20 PM
WMC 3611, Burnaby
ECON 808 - Macroeconomic Theory (4)

An analysis of current theories of aggregate economic behavior. Topics covered in this course may include long-run growth, dynamic general equilibrium models, and business cycle analysis. Students with credit ECON 805 may not take this course for further credit.

ECON 809 - Advanced Macroeconomic Theory (4)

This course covers advanced macroeconomic theory topics. Emphasis will be placed on current research techniques. Topics covered may include: capital and growth theory, real business cycle models, models of fiat money, asset pricing models, endogenous growth models, development traps, macroeconomic complementarities, co-ordination failures, and adaptive behavior in macroeconomic models. Prerequisite: ECON 808. Students with credit for ECON 806 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
G100 John Knowles
We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
Fr 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 3611, Burnaby
WMC 3611, Burnaby
G101 John Knowles
We 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
WMC 3611, Burnaby
ECON 831 - Mathematical Economics (4)

Introduction to mathematics required for PhD level coursework and research in economics. Topics may include real analysis, analysis on metric spaces, differential calculus, convexity, and optimization. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: ECON 331.

ECON 837 - Econometrics I (4)

Develops a foundation for econometric theory and applied econometrics. Topics may include an introduction to measure and probability theory, integration and mathematical expectations, stochastic limit theory, asymptotic theory, mathematical statistics, multiple linear regression, and an introduction to GMM and maximum likelihood estimation. Prerequisite: ECON 835 or equivalent.

ECON 838 - Econometrics II (4)

Develops the core tools of theoretical and applied econometrics including time series, cross sectional, and panel data methods. Topics may include limited dependent variable models, GMM, instrumental variables, ARMA models, unit roots and cointegration, fixed and random effects, incidental parameters, testing, program evaluation, nonlinear regression, semi- and nonparametric methods. Prerequisite: ECON 837.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
G100 Bertille Antoine
Tu 9:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 3611, Burnaby
WMC 3611, Burnaby
G101 Bertille Antoine
Tu 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
WMC 3611, Burnaby

Those specializing in economics and business administration must include

ECON 831 - Mathematical Economics (4)

Introduction to mathematics required for PhD level coursework and research in economics. Topics may include real analysis, analysis on metric spaces, differential calculus, convexity, and optimization. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: ECON 331.

and both of

ECON 803 - Microeconomic Theory II (4)

The course subsequent to ECON 802 which covers advanced Microeconomic theory on a dynamic and general equilibrium basis. Prerequisite: ECON 802. Offered once a year.

ECON 804 - Advanced Topics in Microeconomic Theory (4)

The course following ECON 802 and 803 which covers such topics as equilibrium theory, axiomatic analysis, stability analysis, income distribution, dynamic micro models, and models of non-market economics. Prerequisite: ECON 802 and 803 or equivalent.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
G100 Chris Bidner
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
We 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
WMC 3611, Burnaby
WMC 3611, Burnaby
G101 Chris Bidner
Mo 7:30 PM – 8:20 PM
WMC 3611, Burnaby

or both of

ECON 808 - Macroeconomic Theory (4)

An analysis of current theories of aggregate economic behavior. Topics covered in this course may include long-run growth, dynamic general equilibrium models, and business cycle analysis. Students with credit ECON 805 may not take this course for further credit.

ECON 809 - Advanced Macroeconomic Theory (4)

This course covers advanced macroeconomic theory topics. Emphasis will be placed on current research techniques. Topics covered may include: capital and growth theory, real business cycle models, models of fiat money, asset pricing models, endogenous growth models, development traps, macroeconomic complementarities, co-ordination failures, and adaptive behavior in macroeconomic models. Prerequisite: ECON 808. Students with credit for ECON 806 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
G100 John Knowles
We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
Fr 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 3611, Burnaby
WMC 3611, Burnaby
G101 John Knowles
We 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
WMC 3611, Burnaby

Those specializing in economics must also complete ECON 900 which does not count towards the 11 courses. Other courses may be drawn from those normally offered at the graduate level by this or other related departments. Normally, a student must complete at least five courses of regularly scheduled course work within this department; exceptions to this rule must be approved by the student's supervisory committee and the graduate program committee.

2. Successful performance in written comprehensive examinations.

2.1 Students specializing in economics write comprehensive examinations in economic theory and one other field. In addition, students complete a field either by successfully completing two courses approved by the graduate program chair (other than required or readings courses) with at least an A- average, or a comprehensive examination in the field. The economic theory comprehensive exams consist of separate examinations in micro and macroeconomic theory. The microeconomics comprehensive theory examination usually encompasses topics and readings covered by ECON 802, 803, and 804. The macroeconomics comprehensive theory examination usually encompasses topics and readings in ECON 807, 808, and 809. Comprehensive exams in other fields normally encompass topics and readings presented in the main courses in those fields.

2.2 Students specializing in economics and business administration must write a comprehensive economic theory exam covering topics and guideline readings of either microeconomics (ECON 802, 803, and 804), or macroeconomics (ECON 807, 808 and 809). The student will complete three fields, subject to the following: a) at least two field requirements are satisfied by written examinations; b) at least two are drawn from accounting, finance, management science, marketing and organization behavior.

2.3 Arrangements for students specializing in economics and a related discipline, or economics and business administration and a related field will be recommended by the student’s supervisory committee and approved by the department's graduate program committee.

2.4 Normally, full time students write micro/macro theory comprehensive exams at the first opportunity after the exam period of their second term.

3. An original and significant thesis completed by the candidate under department faculty supervision.

Dissertation Procedures

Thesis Proposal Seminar

This will be given by each candidate to fulfil the ECON 900 course requirement. ECON 900 will be completed in the summer term following completion of the student’s theory comprehensive examinations. Each candidate produces a written paper, makes it available to all interested department members and presents it on a pre-announced date in the departmental seminar. The candidate’s supervisory committee should attend and arrange for others interested to also attend. That committee, along with the candidate, should decide on the future course of thesis research paying due regard to the comments that have been received.

Thesis Core and a Thesis Seminar

These should be given by each candidate after the supervisory committee agrees that the thesis is substantially complete and before it is formally approved for defence. The thesis core should be a paper that describes the major original contributions of the thesis (preferably in a form appropriate for journal submission) and should be available to all interested department members.

Thesis Defence

Procedures for the thesis defence are described in the graduate general regulations (see 1.9 - 1.11).

Satisfactory Performance

Each candidate’s progress is assessed at least once a year in the fall term. Any student who performs unsatisfactorily is subject to the review of unsatisfactory progress described in graduate general regulations (see 1.8.2 Review of Unsatisfactory Progress).

Academic Requirements within the Graduate General Regulations

All graduate students must satisfy the academic requirements that are specified in the Graduate General Regulations, as well as the specific requirements for the program in which they are enrolled.