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Department of Philosophy Simon Fraser University Calendar | Spring 2018

Ethics

Certificate

Students complete a minimum of 18 units, which includes three core courses in ethical theory (9-10 units) and three elective courses drawn from one of the streams listed below (9-12 units). In certain cases, students may devise their own stream in consultation with the philosophy undergraduate chair.

Students are responsible for completing prerequisites for any of the following courses. Note that students may gain entry to any of this certificate's philosophy courses by taking one of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121 or 221.

A minimum grade of C- is required in all courses that are used to fufill the requirements of the certificate. An overall Simon Fraser University cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 2.25 must be maintained. All upper division philosophy courses must be completed at Simon Fraser University.

Program Requirements

Core Courses

Students complete both of

PHIL 320 - Social and Political Philosophy (3)

An examination of an issue or selection of issues in social and political philosophy. Contemporary or historical readings or a mixture of these will be used. Possible topics include: justice, the law and legal systems, sovereignty, power and authority, democracy, liberty and equality. Sometimes the course will focus on the views of historically important political philosophers, such as Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Bentham, Mill and Marx. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 220, 221 or ENV 320W.

PHIL 321 - Topics in Moral Philosophy (3)

An advanced investigation of central issues and theories in moral philosophy. In any given term, the course may focus on a general theory or concept or concern, for example meta-ethics, utilitarianism, or theories of rights. Sometimes it will focus on a particular problem or problems, such as medical ethics, moral personhood, or free will and moral responsibility. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 220, 221 or ENV 320W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nicholas Smyth
Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
BLU 10021, Burnaby

and one of

PHIL 322 - History of Ethics (3)

An examination of an issue or selection of issues in the history of moral or political philosophy. Historical readings will be the primary focus and may include important figures such as Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Hume, and Kant. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 150, 151, 220 or 221.

PHIL 327 - Global Health Ethics (3)

Ethical issues related to public health as they are located in and influenced by a global context. Consideration of several ethical approaches including utilitarianism, deontic ethics, and the capabilities approach, as well as theories of justice. Application of approaches to topics ranging from global markets in human organs to international migration of health workers and pharmaceutical testing in the developing world. Prerequisite: 60 units and one of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121 or 221; or HSCI 319. PHIL 327 is identical to HSCI 327 and students may not receive credit for both. Students who have completed HSCI 320 or the spring 2011 offering of PHIL 331 may not complete this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jeremy Snyder
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 9011, Burnaby
PHIL 328 - Environmental Philosophy (3)

A survey of contemporary issues in environmental ethics. Topics may include: animal rights, the intrinsic value of nature, 'deep ecology', obligations to future generations, conservation, environmental justice, as well as relevant background materials in ethical theory. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 220, 221 or ENV 320W. Students who have completed PHIL 318 may not take this course for further credit.

PHIL 421W - Advanced Topics in Ethical Theory (4)

A highly focused, advanced examination of a selection of topics in normative or meta-ethics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: two 300 level PHIL courses; it is strongly recommended that students have taken some prior course in moral theory. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sam Black
We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby

any 300 or 400 division PHIL special topics course in ethics (consult the philosophy undergraduate advisor to confirm whether a given special topics course qualifies as an ethics course)

Concentration in Ethics, Justice and Law

The stream is primarily for students in the School of Criminology, or those who are majoring in political science who wish to focus their studies around issues of ethics and justice as it relates to law.

Students complete three of

ECON 427W - Industrial Organization: Law and Economics (3)

An in depth examination of the application of economic reasoning to the law. The course considers how legal relationships influence behavior and how economic models can explain the structure of the law. A selected number of topics will be covered, and may include the economic approach to common law; property rights; contracts; torts; criminal behavior; family law; and corporate bankruptcy law. Prerequisite: ECON 201 or 301, and BUEC 333 or ECON 302. Students with credit for BUEC 427 or BUEC 495 cannot take this course for further credit. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Douglas Allen
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
AQ 5036, Burnaby
CRIM 314 - Mental Disorder, Criminality and the Law (3)

Critical examination of the impact of psychiatry and related clinical professions on the criminal justice system. Relationship between institutions of mental health and legal control. The relevance of psychiatric theory and decision-making for the processing of mentally disordered offenders. The role of forensic clinicians in the courts, prisons, mental hospitals and related agencies. Specific issues addressed in this course will include psychiatric assessment, criminal responsibility, fitness to stand trial, prediction of dangerousness, treatment of mentally ill criminals and the penal and therapeutic commitment of the insane. Prerequisite: CRIM 101. Recommended: CRIM 131.

CRIM 331 - Advanced Criminal Law (3)

An extension of CRIM 230, this course will examine Canadian criminal law in greater depth as well as in comparison with other jurisdictions. Each term several substantive areas will be analysed closely. The areas to be examined will be determined by student interest but may include sexual offences, public order offences, mental disorder and the criminal process, property offences, etc. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and 230.

CRIM 333 - Gender, Law and the State (3)

A consideration of the relationship of women and men to the State, law and society. Analysis of concepts such as patriarchal relations, criminalization, racism and sexuality, using feminist and masculinity theories. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and 135. Recommended: CRIM 213.

CRIM 334 - Law and Human Reproduction (3)

Overview of theoretical perspectives and available research on debates linked with human reproduction. Reconsideration of the effects of legislation, social policy and social change on contraception, birth, abortion, adoption, eugenics policies, new reproductive technologies, sexualities, and other topics. Historical and contemporary examples will be used. Feminist perspectives will be featured along with other approaches to human reproduction. Students with credit for CRIM 416, 417, 418 under the title Law and Reproduction, or GSWS 334 (or WS 334), may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 335 - Human Rights and Civil Liberties (3)

A study of the relationship between the government and the individual. Focus upon the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and its interpretation by the judiciary. Examination of the issues of equality before the law, freedom of speech, freedom of religion and freedom of expression. A study of human rights at the international, federal and provincial levels. Prerequisite: CRIM 330.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Tamara O'Doherty
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SECB 1013, Burnaby
D101
We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D102
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D103
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D104
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
CRIM 338 - Philosophy of Law (3)

Introduction to the philosophy of law. Concepts of law, constitution and sovereignty. The nature and sources of the law. Examination of natural law, legal positivism, Kelsen's pure theory of law, legal realism, modern normative and analytical theories, critical legal theory and feminist theory. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and 135.

CRIM 429 - Indigenous Peoples and International Law (3)

An examination of how relations between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples framed and were framed by the development of international law from the 15th century onward. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 or FNST 101 or 201 or permission of instructor. Students with credit for CRIM 416, or 418 under the title "Indigenous Peoples and International Law" or "Indigenous Peoples and Evolving International Relations", or FNST 429 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ted Palys
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 9095, Burnaby
or FNST 429 - Indigenous Peoples and International Law (3)

An examination of how relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples framed and were framed by the development of international law from the 15th century onward. Prerequisite: FNST 101 or 201W, or CRIM 101, or permission of instructor. Students with credit for CRIM 429, or under CRIM 416 or 418 under the title "Indigenous Peoples and International Law" or "Indigenous Peoples and Evolving International Relations" may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ted, Dr. Palys
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 9095, Burnaby
GSWS 334 - Law and Human Reproduction (3)

Overview of theoretical perspectives and available research on debates linked with human reproduction. Reconsideration of the effects of legislation, social policy and social change on contraception, birth, abortion, adoption, eugenics policies, new reproductive technologies, sexualities, and other topics. Historical and contemporary examples will be used. Feminist perspectives will be featured along with other approaches to human reproduction. Students with credit for CRIM 416, 417, 418 under the title Law and Reproduction, or CRIM 334, may not take this course for further credit.

POL 324 - The Canadian Constitution (4)

An analysis of the Canadian constitution from a theoretical and comparative perspective. Amendment, entrenchment, civil rights. Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department.

POL 344 - International Law (4)

Sovereignty, nationality, jurisdiction, arbitration. Examination of selected cases exemplifying present trends in the international legal order. Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
E100 Linda Elmose
Th 4:30 PM – 8:20 PM
AQ 4120, Burnaby
POL 417 - Human Rights Theories (4)

This course introduces students to the problems involved in the assertion of universal moral standards across political and cultural divides. These issues will be explored at a theoretical level, and in the context of specific human rights controversies. Prerequisite: Eight upper division units in political science or permission of the department. Recommended: PHIL 220 or 320.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Michael Laurence
Tu 4:30 PM – 8:20 PM
SWH 10061, Burnaby
PSYC 376 - Experimental Psychology and Law (3)

The roles of experimental developmental, cognitive, and social psychology in the understanding of behavior and perceptions of individuals in legal contexts. Topics include eyewitness testimony, autobiographical memory, interviewing, deception detection, and juror decision-making. Prerequisite: PSYC 201W and PSYC 268. Recommended: PSYC 210.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education

Concentration in Ethics, Business and Economics

This stream is intended for students in the Beedie School of Business, or those who are majoring in economics.

Students complete three of

BUS 303 - Business, Society and Ethics (3)

This course examines and reviews contemporary thinking on the changing role of business and business persons in the operations of society, particularly Canadian society. The course explores the changing legal, ethical and regulatory environments of business focusing on the critical alignments -- values, policies, technology and legal approaches -- between the modern organization and its broader public. Prerequisite: 60 units. Students with credit for BUS 103, COMM 103, or COMM 303 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Thomas Culham
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SECB 1014, Burnaby
D200 Kathleen Burke
Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
SUR 5240, Surrey
D300 Kathleen Burke
Th 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2230, Burnaby
D400 Sessional
We 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 4150, Burnaby
D500 Michaela Lucas
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 2200, Burnaby
E100 Sessional
Tu 4:30 PM – 7:20 PM
WMC 2220, Burnaby
BUS 432 - International Human Resource Management (3)

Significance of multinational complexity and diversity (cultural, economic, demographic, etc.) to the human resource function. Interplay among human resource functions (employee procurement, allocation, utilization), types of employees, and countries of operation. Prerequisite: BUS 360W and one of BUS 381 or 374; 60 units. Recommended: BUS 346.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 David C Thomas
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 3250, Burnaby
BUS 449 - Ethical Issues in Marketing (3)

A critical examination of topics such as consumerism, marketing ethics, and social responsibility, efficiency of marketing or ecological marketing. The particular emphasis may vary depending on the interests of the class and instructor. Prerequisite: BUS 343, 360W; 60 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Christine Pitt
Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
SUR 5360, Surrey
CRIM 336 - Corporate Crime and Corporate Regulation (3)

An examination and analysis of the nature, scope and impact of corporate crime, the principal organizational, social, political and economic factors involved in the definition and commission of such crime, and the ways in which governments and organizations respond to the problem. Particular types of corporate crime will be used as vehicles for exploring the legal and administrative framework that defines and regulates corporate wrongdoing. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and 135. Recommended: ECON 101.

ECON 342 - International Trade (3)

Topics discussed in this course are: gains from trade in a classical world; the modern theory of international trade; factor price equalization; empirical tests and extensions of the pure theory model; economic growth and international trade; the nature and effects of protection; motives and welfare effects of factor movements; multinational enterprises; the brain drain; customs union theory; pollution control and international trade. Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205; 60 units or permission of the department. Students with credit for ECON 442 cannot take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Stephen Easton
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 3181, Burnaby
D101
Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D102
Mo 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D103
Tu 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D104
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D105
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D106
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5026, Burnaby
D107
We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5026, Burnaby
D108
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5026, Burnaby
ECON 354 - Comparative Economic Institutions (3)

People in small scale societies face numerous economic problems and have devised a variety of institutions to solve them. Using detailed case studies as a source of empirical information, we will develop economic concepts and models that help to make sense of these institutional arrangements. Prerequisite: ECON 103 and 105; 60 units. Students with credit for ECON 387 in Fall 1998 or Fall 1999, or ECON 383 in Fall 2001 or Fall 2003 may not take this course for further credit.

ECON 355W - Economic Development (4)

Analysis of theories of economic development. Consideration will be given to the requirements of successful development, to aspects of international co-operation, and to procedures of economic planning. Problems of emerging countries and models of various developing economies will be studied. Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205; 60 units. Students with credit for ECON 355 or ECON 455 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 M EMRUL HASAN
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 9002, Burnaby
D101
Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
WMC 2523, Burnaby
D102
Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 2523, Burnaby
D103
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
WMC 2523, Burnaby
D104
We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D105
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D106
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D107
Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D108
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D109
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D110
Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
D111
We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D112
Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
ECON 392 - Public Economics: Role of Government (3)

The study of the normative rationale for government in a market economy through an analysis of distributional issues, public goods, externalities, non-competitive market structures, and asymmetric information. Prerequisite: ECON 201 or 301; 60 units. Quantitative.

GSWS 308 - Women in the Economy: Paid and Unpaid Labour (4)

Explores the nature and conditions of women's paid and unpaid labour in the economy as well as various theories which explain labour market discrimination, the impact of national public policies on women's labour and the transnational interconnections that affect women's paid and unpaid labour. Prerequisite: 30 units including three units in GSWS or WS or GDST. Students who have completed SA 335 or WS 310 under the title Women and Work may not complete this course for further credit.

Concentration in Ethics and Global Justice

This stream is intended primarily for students in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, or the Faculty of Health Sciences who wish to focus their studies around issues of justice in an international and multicultural context.

Students complete three of

CRIM 315 - Restorative Justice (4)

The course will contrast restorative justice with the dominant adversarial/retributive/punitive model of justice through a critical analysis of these two paradigms of justice. Several key principles, assumptions, and concepts necessary for understanding the foundation and practice of restorative justice will be introduced and explored. Prerequisite: 45 units. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Brenda Morrison
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 10041, Burnaby
D101
Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 11901, Burnaby
D102
Fr 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5026, Burnaby
D103
Fr 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D104
Mo 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D105
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 6122, Burnaby
D106
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5035, Burnaby
D107
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 2120, Burnaby
FNST 401 - Aboriginal Peoples and Public Policy (3)

An examination of First Nations and Aboriginal peoples' perspectives on political, social and legal issues involving their rights as first citizens of Canada and North America, and the practical and political relations with various levels of government. Issues examined include: Aboriginal rights and title questions, self government models and concepts, constitutional matters, the impact of federal government policies, including their impact on women's lives, and Aboriginal community and First Nations politics. Prerequisite: FNST 101 and 201W. Recommended: POL 221.

FNST 419 - Aboriginal/Indigenous Justice (3)

An in-depth examination of Aboriginal/Indigenous conceptions of justice in dealing with crime and other trouble in Indigenous communities, and in relations among peoples. Prerequisite: FNST 101 or 201W, or CRIM 101, or permission of the instructor. Students with credit for CRIM 416, 418, or 419 may not take this course for further credit.

FNST 429 - Indigenous Peoples and International Law (3)

An examination of how relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples framed and were framed by the development of international law from the 15th century onward. Prerequisite: FNST 101 or 201W, or CRIM 101, or permission of instructor. Students with credit for CRIM 429, or under CRIM 416 or 418 under the title "Indigenous Peoples and International Law" or "Indigenous Peoples and Evolving International Relations" may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ted, Dr. Palys
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 9095, Burnaby
FNST 443W - Aboriginal Peoples, History and the Law (4)

Traces the development of legal doctrine pertaining to Aboriginal peoples in Canada and the United States, including its shared roots in British colonial law and policy. Prerequisite: 45 units including FNST 101, 201W and one other FNST course; or permission of the instructor. Students with credit for HIST 443, or HIST 485 or 486 under this topic may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

GSWS 308 - Women in the Economy: Paid and Unpaid Labour (4)

Explores the nature and conditions of women's paid and unpaid labour in the economy as well as various theories which explain labour market discrimination, the impact of national public policies on women's labour and the transnational interconnections that affect women's paid and unpaid labour. Prerequisite: 30 units including three units in GSWS or WS or GDST. Students who have completed SA 335 or WS 310 under the title Women and Work may not complete this course for further credit.

GSWS 314 - Race, Class and Gender (4)

An examination of feminist, Marxist and anti-racist theories pertaining to the historical development, social construction, and interactive nature of race, class and gender relations. Prerequisite: 15 units. Students with credit for either GSWS 301 (or WS 301) or GSWS 310 (or WS 310) as Special Topics: Race, Class and Gender may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Habiba Zaman
Tu 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 10011, Burnaby
GSWS 327 - Aboriginal Women in Canada (4)

Themes and issues relating to the historical and contemporary experiences of aboriginal women in Canada: Indigenous theories of gender; evolution and political function of stereotypes of Indigenous women in Canada; history of Canadian legislation regulating Indigenous identity; relevance of feminist analysis; and history of activism. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students who have taken FNST 322 under this topic may not take this course for further credit. FNST 327 and GSWS 327 (or WS 327) are identical and students may not take both courses for credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Deanna Reder
Mo, We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 9095, Burnaby
HSCI 308 - Sickness and Wealth: Health in Global Perspective (3)

New formations of wealth and power that contribute to international health disparities and consideration of the relations of power both between and within nation-states that make some people sick and keep others well. Economic and political collusions that make people sick. Infectious disease and child survival, health implications of war, biotech, and the politics of food and water. Prerequisite: 45 units. Recommended: HSCI 130.

HSCI 319W - Applied Health Ethics (3)

Practical ethical and legal issues in health sciences, emphasizing population and public health. Case studies approach highlighting current ethical dilemmas and decision-making in the context of global to local legal frameworks. Prerequisite: 45 units including nine HSCI units, one of which must be a 200 division course. HSCI 319 is identical to PHIL 319 and students cannot receive credit for both courses. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Diego Silva
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 3260, Burnaby
D101
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 10401, Burnaby
D102
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 11401, Burnaby
D103
Th 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
BLU 10401, Burnaby
D104
Th 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
BLU 11401, Burnaby
D105
Th 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
BLU 10401, Burnaby
HSCI 406 - Global Perspectives in Indigenous Health (3)

Examination of the health and health problems of Indigenous peoples from a global perspective. Comparative study of social and historical factors affecting Indigenous peoples that contribute to health conditions and health status. Efforts of Indigenous peoples to restore health to their Nations. Prerequisite: 60 units and completion of HSCI 305 and either HSCI 340 or HSCI 319W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100
Th 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
SSCC 9000, Burnaby
IS 302 - Introduction to Humanitarian Intervention (4)

Investigates complex emergencies and the outcomes of conflict, specifically forced migration by refugees and internally displaced people (IDPs). Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Geetanjali Gill
Fr 9:30 AM – 1:20 PM
HCC 2945, Vancouver
IS 410 - Politics, Institutions and Development (4)

The quality of institutions' exercises a crucial influence on the prospects for development. Aims are to interrogate this claim through analysis of different paths of economic growth and change across the developing world. Examination of the ways in which politics influences economic growth and distribution; the relationships between political systems and patterns of development; and the politics of institutions and state formation. Prerequisite: 90 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Leslie Armijo
Th 8:30 AM – 12:20 PM
HCC 2235, Vancouver
IS 427 - Globalization, Poverty and Inequality (4)

Analyzes the origins and the economic consequences of globalization and the uneven process of economic development around the world in relation to poverty, by considering the measurement of poverty, its causes and dynamics, as well as public policy for poverty reduction. Prerequisite: 45 units.

POL 312 - Modern Political Thought (4)

A discussion of selected political philosophers in the western tradition from Hobbes to Rawls. Prerequisite: POL 210 or equivalent, or permission of the department.

POL 344 - International Law (4)

Sovereignty, nationality, jurisdiction, arbitration. Examination of selected cases exemplifying present trends in the international legal order. Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
E100 Linda Elmose
Th 4:30 PM – 8:20 PM
AQ 4120, Burnaby
POL 346 - International Organization (4)

An examination of the structures and processes and the main substantive decisions of the United Nations and related international organizations. Based upon in-depth study of the UN Charter, the Security Council, General Assembly, Secretary-general and Secretariat and their constitutional and political interactions since 1945, with special attention to the theory and practice of international organization advanced by the principal Western countries, the Soviet Union and Soviet bloc, the People's Republic of China and leading Third World countries. Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 James Busumtwi-sam
Th 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
BLU 10021, Burnaby
D101
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 6125, Burnaby
D102
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
D103
Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
POL 411 - Normative Political Theory (4)

Advanced seminar examining selected themes, debates and texts in recent normative political philosophy, with an emphasis on contemporary democratic theory. Prerequisite: POL 210 or 312 or 313; or permission of the department.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 David Laycock
Tu 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 2531, Burnaby
POL 416 - Feminist Social and Political Thought (4)

This course will examine the works of major feminist thinkers and the problems of developing feminist theory. Prerequisite: Eight upper division units in political science or permission of the department.

POL 417 - Human Rights Theories (4)

This course introduces students to the problems involved in the assertion of universal moral standards across political and cultural divides. These issues will be explored at a theoretical level, and in the context of specific human rights controversies. Prerequisite: Eight upper division units in political science or permission of the department. Recommended: PHIL 220 or 320.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Michael Laurence
Tu 4:30 PM – 8:20 PM
SWH 10061, Burnaby
SA 363 - Process of Development and Underdevelopment (SA) (4)

An examination of sociological and anthropological theories of development and underdevelopment as applied to the Third World. The nature and consequences of world system linkages; colonialism and decolonization; patterns of social change in selected societies and regions. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 388 - Comparative Studies of Minority Indigenous Peoples (A) (4)

The social and cultural patterns of aboriginal populations within various modern nation-states. Their relations with majority societies and with other indigenous groups across the world. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 418 - International Health: Global Policies and Local Realities (A) (4)

An investigation of the social, cultural, and political issues that contribute to problems of ill-health in resource-poor countries and the major efforts in international public health to address these problems. It explores the application of knowledge about social, and especially gender relations in international health, with particular attention to local perspectives and grassroots initiatives. Institutional frameworks intended to promote health development are examined in historical and contemporary perspective through case studies on topics such as: malaria, population control, maternal health, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis. Prerequisite: 90 credit hours, which must include SA 101 or 150. Highly recommended: SA 218, 302W and 318. Breadth-Social Sciences.

SA 430 - States, Cultures and Global Transitions (SA) (4)

Through a program of focused readings, case studies, and films, this course offers a new perspective on the study of globalization. It balances classical themes with contemporary approaches to global processes of economic, political, and cultural transformation. The course tackles such topics as the material aspects of cooperation and coercion, class relations in structures of capital accumulation and global governance, and cultural dynamics. Alternatives to Euro-American centrism are explored through the examples of citizenship, cultural politics, ethnic and religious conflicts, human rights, indigenous rights, and women's rights. Prerequisite: Minimum of 72 units including either SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Students with credit for SA 463 completed in 2004-3 may not complete this course for further credit.

Concentration in Ethics and the Environment

This stream is intended for students in the Faculty of Environment or students majoring in biological sciences or economics who wish to add a concentration in ethics to their studies. The SA and GSWS courses also opens this stream to Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences students and the broader University community.

Students complete three of

ARCH 365 - Archaeological Perspectives on Human Ecology (3)

Examines methods, theories, and concepts for understanding how past cultures interacted with their bio-physical surroundings. Integrates diverse kinds of data and knowledge to understand these relationships. Topics to be addressed include local and traditional ecological knowledge, paleoenvironmental reconstruction, human-environment interaction, human-induced environmental changes, paleodiet, and domestication. Prerequisite: ARCH 201; or any two of ARCH 100, REM 100, GEOG 100, EVSC 100; and 45 credits.

ARCH 386 - Archaeological Resource Management (3)

Surveys the origins, implementations, and need for archaeological heritage legislation on an international and national scale. Topical issues associated with contract archaeology, public archaeology, native heritage, and avocational societies are incorporated. Prerequisite: ARCH 201.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Bob Muir
We 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 6136, Burnaby
BISC 204 - Introduction to Ecology (3)

An introduction to biotic-environmental relationships and dynamics; ecological concepts; population dynamics, variation, adaptation and evolution. Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102 with a grade of C- or better. Students with credit for GEOG 215 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jennifer Cory
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Th 9:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 3181, Burnaby
BLU 9660, Burnaby
D101
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D102
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
D103
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D104
Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
BLU 10901, Burnaby
D105
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
D106
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
BISC 309 - Conservation Biology (3)

An examination of the primary threats to biodiversity, how biological processes contribute to the persistence of populations and structure of communities, and species and landscape approaches to conservation in the real world. Prerequisite: BISC 204 with a grade of C- or better. Students who have taken BISC 474 in Spring 2006 or BISC 475 in Spring 2008 as special topics courses titled 'Conservation Ecology' cannot take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nick Dulvy
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Th 9:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SSCC 9000, Burnaby
SSCC 9000, Burnaby
D101
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D102
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D103
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D104
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D105
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
BISC 419 - Wildlife Biology (3)

Theoretical and applied aspects of ecology and behavior in relation to wildlife populations and their habitats, with emphasis on important mammals and birds in British Columbia. Prerequisite: BISC 304 with a grade of C- or better. Recommended: BISC 316 and STAT 201.

BISC 440 - Biodiversity (3)

The production and organization of biodiversity (investigations of species, and an in-depth look at taxonomy, systematics and phylogenetics). Evolutionary and ecological theories behind the patterns of biodiversity (the current and future geographic distribution of species, and how biodiversity is related to ecosystem function). The values society gives biodiversity (how our values are reflected in law and regulation). Prerequisite: BISC 300, STAT 201 or equivalent, both with C or better, plus 75 units. Students with credit for BISC 440W may not repeat this course for further credit.

ECON 260 - Environmental Economics (3)

Economic analysis of environmental problems (water and air pollution, etc.). Evaluation of market failures due to externalities and public goods. Market and non-market regulation of environmental problems. Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200. Students with credit for ECON 360 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kristin Dust
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
ECON 362 - Economics of Natural Resources (3)

Application of economic analysis to natural resource problems and efficient management practice; public policy considerations in respect to development and conservation; benefit-cost analysis. Prerequisite: ECON 201 or 301; 60 units. Quantitative.

ENV 321 - Ecological Economics (4)

Introduces students to the concepts and methods of ecological economics. Provides students with grounding in the core principles of conventional economics applied to the environment but then extends this to the integration of economics and ecology to create a new ecological-economic understanding of environmental change and sustainability. Prerequisite: Minimum of 45 units. Students with credit for REM 321 cannot take ENV 321 for further credit.

or REM 321 - Ecological Economics (4)

Introduces students to the concepts and methods of ecological economics. Provides students with grounding in the core principles of conventional economics applied to the environment but then extends this to the integration of economics and ecology to create a new ecological-economic understanding of environmental change and sustainability. Prerequisite: minimum of 45 units. Students with credit for ENV 321 cannot take REM 321 for further credit.

GEOG 322 - World Resources (4)

An analysis of the use and development of natural resources from a geographic, economic and institutional perspective. Prerequisite: At least 30 units including GEOG 221. Students with credit for GEOG 322W may not take this course for further credit.

GEOG 325 - Geographies of Consumption (4)

Spaces, places, landscapes, and scales of consumption emphasizing commodity cultures, marketing, retail, ideology, subjectivity, objects, technology, and tourism. Prerequisite: GEOG 221 or 261.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Paul Kingsbury
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCC 9000, Burnaby
D101
Th 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D102
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D103
Fr 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
D104
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
GEOG 381 - Territory, Power, State (4)

Surveys the manner in which power relations are expressed territorially. Attention given to such topics as state sovereignty, colonialism, rights, and law. Prerequisite: GEOG 241. Students with credit for GEOG 381W may not take this course for further credit.

GEOG 386 - Health Geography (4)

A survey of health issues from a geographic perspective, including major spatial influences shaping the health status of populations and health-place relationships. Prerequisite: at least 30 units, including either GEOG 241 or HSCI 130.

GEOG 389W - Nature and Society (4)

Examines the relationship between nature and society, covering the dominant geographical approaches to human-environment interaction, and their social, spatial, and political economic effects. Prerequisite: GEOG 221 or GEOG 241 (Students who received credit for EVSC 200 before 2011 may use it to meet the prerequisite requirement for this course). Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 John Pierce
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 4150, Burnaby
D101
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5020, Burnaby
D102
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2533, Burnaby
D103
We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
GEOG 440 - Property, Land, Society (4)

An examination of property, particularly in relation to land, with an emphasis on its social, political, and spatial dimensions. Prerequisite: 60 units, including eight of upper division geography. Students with credit for GEOG 440W may not take this course for further credit.

HSCI 304 - Perspectives on Human Health and the Environment (3)

Environmental risks and their impacts on human health. Chemical and biological hazards. Methodological approaches to their detection, assessment, management, and mitigation. Prerequisite: Two HSCI 200-level courses, one of which may be taken concurrently.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ryan Allen
Th 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SWH 10081, Burnaby
REM 311 - Applied Ecology and Sustainable Environments (3)

Students will learn to apply the ecological concepts introduced in prereq courses to applied ecological problems at the population, community, and ecosystem levels of organization. Emphasis will be placed on processes which drive ecological dynamics, on recognizing those processes and dynamics in applied contexts, and on interpreting ecological data. Prerequisite: REM 100 or EVSC 100; BISC 204 or GEOG 215; STAT 101 or GEOG 251 or STAT 201 or equivalent. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Scott Harrison
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
BLU 10011, Burnaby
D101
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 3148.2, Burnaby
D102
Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 3148.2, Burnaby
D103
Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 3148.2, Burnaby
REM 356 - Institutional Arrangements for Sustainable Environmental Management (3)

This course provides an overview of some basic legislation, agencies, and policies which currently are in use to regulate the natural environment at the international, nation, provincial, regional, and local levels. Its purpose is to present a basic set of evaluative questions which can be used to address the effectiveness and efficiency of the environmental regulatory and management systems currently in use. Prerequisite: REM 100.

REM 445 - Environmental Risk Assessment (3)

Students receive theory and practical experience in the control and management of hazardous substances in the environment. This includes the application of techniques used to assess toxicological, ecological and human health risks of contaminants within the current regulatory framework. Prerequisite: MATH 151 or 154 or 157; STAT 101 or 103 or 201 or 301 or GEOG 251.

REM 471 - Forest Ecosystem Management (3)

Students will examine the problems of managing forest ecosystems for a variety of societal goals and objectives. The course will start with an examination of the ecological characteristics of forest ecosystems and their dynamics. The second section will focus on the objectives and tools of forest management in an ecological context. The final section of the course will focus on the institutions, economics and policies of forest management, with a focus on British Columbia's historical and current management issues. This course will involve lectures, group discussions, field trips, and exercises. Prerequisite: At least one of REM 311, BISC 304, BISC 310, BISC 404, GEOG 315, or GEOG 316.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ken Lertzman
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
BLU 10011, Burnaby
D101
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5047, Burnaby
D102
We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D103
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5035, Burnaby
SA 326 - Ecology and Social Thought (S) (4)

An examination of recent social thought that is concerned with environmental and ecological themes. It will address a selection from the following themes: technology evaluation; technology and science as ideology; ecology and social inequality; the concepts of ecosystem, environment and wilderness; the self-world relationship; politics of environmental uses; environment and the economy. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 371 - The Environment and Society (SA) (4)

An examination of environmental issues in their social context. Environmental issues are on the leading edge of contemporary public concern and public policy debates. This course will examine such issues as the relationship between social organization and mode of subsistence, the politics of hunger, and the way in which human societies in their particular social, historical, and cultural contexts view and interact with the natural world. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nicholas Scott
Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
HCC 2945, Vancouver

Concentration in Ethics and Health

This stream is intended for students in the Faculty of Health Sciences who are interested in focusing their studies around ethical issues in health, life and death.

Students complete three of

CRIM 314 - Mental Disorder, Criminality and the Law (3)

Critical examination of the impact of psychiatry and related clinical professions on the criminal justice system. Relationship between institutions of mental health and legal control. The relevance of psychiatric theory and decision-making for the processing of mentally disordered offenders. The role of forensic clinicians in the courts, prisons, mental hospitals and related agencies. Specific issues addressed in this course will include psychiatric assessment, criminal responsibility, fitness to stand trial, prediction of dangerousness, treatment of mentally ill criminals and the penal and therapeutic commitment of the insane. Prerequisite: CRIM 101. Recommended: CRIM 131.

GEOG 386 - Health Geography (4)

A survey of health issues from a geographic perspective, including major spatial influences shaping the health status of populations and health-place relationships. Prerequisite: at least 30 units, including either GEOG 241 or HSCI 130.

GERO 302 - Health Promotion and Aging (3)

This course includes an examination of the development of contemporary understanding and practice of health promotion. Students will be given the opportunity to explore theories and models designed to explain health related behaviors and the determinants of health. Strategies for behavioral change and development of socio-environmental approaches will be discussed in the context of an aging Canadian population. Prerequisite: 60 units. Recommended: GERO 300.

GERO 406 - Death and Dying (3)

The focus of this course is to provide the student with an in-depth understanding of the process of dying. By examining the process of dying, one's personal response to death as well as society's reaction and responsibilities toward dying, the student will gain new insights in caring for the dying person. Prerequisite: 60 units. Recommended: GERO 300.

GERO 420 - Sociology of Aging (4)

The structural and behavioral implications of aging. Topics include demographic aspects of aging; the relationship of aging to political, economic, familial and other social institutions; the psychological significance of aging. Prerequisite: 60 units. Recommended: GERO 300. Students with credit for SA 420 and students may not take this course for further credit.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
HSCI 304 - Perspectives on Human Health and the Environment (3)

Environmental risks and their impacts on human health. Chemical and biological hazards. Methodological approaches to their detection, assessment, management, and mitigation. Prerequisite: Two HSCI 200-level courses, one of which may be taken concurrently.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ryan Allen
Th 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SWH 10081, Burnaby
HSCI 305 - The Canadian Health System (3)

A comparative analysis of the Canadian health care financing and delivery systems and policies. History, organizational principles, health care resources, costs, access to care, quality, and equity. Societal and political issues, threats and values that affect Canada's health care system and others around the world. Prerequisite: 60 units, including nine HSCI units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 John Calvert
We 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCK 9500, Burnaby
HSCI 403 - Health and the Built Environment (3)

Relationships between the physical environment in which people live and their health and well being. How the built environment affects physical activity, obesity, exposure to pathogens and toxins, health status, mental health, and risk of illness and injury. How urban form, physical infrastructure, and landscape and building design can promote health. Prerequisite: 60 units including HSCI 330. Students with credit for HSCI 309 may not complete this course for credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sessional
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 9920, Burnaby
HSCI 319W - Applied Health Ethics (3)

Practical ethical and legal issues in health sciences, emphasizing population and public health. Case studies approach highlighting current ethical dilemmas and decision-making in the context of global to local legal frameworks. Prerequisite: 45 units including nine HSCI units, one of which must be a 200 division course. HSCI 319 is identical to PHIL 319 and students cannot receive credit for both courses. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Diego Silva
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 3260, Burnaby
D101
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 10401, Burnaby
D102
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 11401, Burnaby
D103
Th 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
BLU 10401, Burnaby
D104
Th 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
BLU 11401, Burnaby
D105
Th 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
BLU 10401, Burnaby
HSCI 402 - Substance Use, Addiction and Public Health (3)

Examination of substance use and addiction focusing on alcohol and 'illicit drugs" as major psychoactive use categories — within a framework of public health. Major topics covered in the course include fundamental concepts in substance use and addiction: historical, economic, political factors influencing substance use and control, epidemiology and patterns of substance abuse in general and special risk populations, substance use related morbidity, mortality and social harms and their impacts on public health: social and environmental determinants of substance use, risks and harms, prevention, treatment and approaches and interventions and policy/control options to reduce substance use related risks and harms in the population. Prerequisite: HSCI 214.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 William Small
Th 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
BLU 9011, Burnaby
HSCI 404 - Public Policy and Health Systems (3)

Major public policy issues affecting Canadian and international health care systems. How the public policy process affects financing, delivery, and regulation of health programs and services. Theories of policy development in the health sector. Evaluation of the extent to which evidence influences policy decisions. Controversies, including: finance, regulatory issue, system restructuring, models of governance, public vs. private service delivery and resource allocation. Prerequisite: 60 units including one HSCI course.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 John Calvert
Mo 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 9920, Burnaby
HSCI 481 - Senior Seminar in Social Health Science (3)

An in-depth overview of the sociocultural, epidemiological, and policy aspects of population and public health. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: HSCI majors with 90 units, including at least 15 upper division HSCI units. Other prerequisites may vary according to topic.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rochelle Tucker
We 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
BLU 9920, Burnaby