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To view the Fall 2017 Academic Calendar go to http://www.sfu.ca/students/calendar/2017/fall.html

Department of Political Science Simon Fraser University Calendar | Spring 2018

French Cohort Program in Public and International Affairs Political Science Major with a French Extended Minor

Bachelor of Arts

This cohort program, leading to a political science major with a French extended minor, or a French major with a political science extended minor, is a four year program. It offers students the opportunity to study in Canada's two official languages in British Columbia. This multidisciplinary program, unique in Canada, is delivered primarily in French. It is most suitable for those entering directly from French immersion or Francophone secondary school, who plan to undertake full-time study. However, admission is not limited to such applicants and all interested students who have a high level of French are encouraged to apply for admission.

Non-French cohort program students who wish to enrol in French cohort program courses taught in French must contact the French cohort program advisor.

Admission Requirements

The cohort program normally begins in the fall term, and is for those who have adequate competency in French, as determined by the French language placement test. As it is a cohort program in which students will move together through a significant proportion of their undergraduate studies, those with substantial university transfer credit may need to complete more than the normal 120 units to complete this program.

Program Requirements

Designated Courses

Required courses, as set out below, have sections that are designated as cohort specific (CS), are taught in French and will normally be open only to cohort students.

Cohort Program

This program’s feature is the group cohort setting where students work together in the same specially designed cohort courses. Cohort specific courses and course sections will be offered in French, while some required and elective courses will be taught in English. Visit http://www.sfu.ca/fassfr/fr/frcohort/cours-et-exigences/sequence-de-cours.html for a list of designated program courses, including the language of instruction and the course offerings schedule. At least one term of studies at a francophone university is required.

Lower Division Requirements

Students complete a total of 33 units, comprised of 18 Political Science (POL) units (12 units of which will be taught in the French language) and 15 French (FREN) units, by completing all of

POL 100 - Introduction to Politics and Government (3) *CS

A comprehensive introduction to the study of politics and government for both political science majors and students specializing in other disciplines. The course will explore the major concepts, methods, approaches and issues in political science, as well as the primary components of government structure and the political process. POL 101W is the Writing certified version of POL 100 and students cannot receive credit for both courses. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Eline de Rooij
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
DFA 300, Burnaby
D101
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
BLU 11911, Burnaby
D102
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
BLU 11911, Burnaby
D103
Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 11911, Burnaby
D104
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
BLU 10901, Burnaby
D105
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
BLU 10901, Burnaby
D106
Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 10901, Burnaby
D107
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5047, Burnaby
D108
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
D109
Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
D110
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
BLU 11901, Burnaby
D111
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
BLU 11901, Burnaby
D112
Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 11901, Burnaby
D113
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 2501, Burnaby
D114
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 2501, Burnaby
D115
Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 2501, Burnaby
D116
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
D117
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
POL 200 - Investigating Politics: Research Design and Qualitative Methods (3) *

Introduces different aspects of research design in political science, as well as different qualitative research techniques and the epistemological perspectives that inform them. Introduces important analytical and conceptual skills necessary to understand and evaluate political science research. Students with credit for POL 202 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Darren Bohle
Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
WMC 3535, Burnaby
J100 Darren Bohle
Fr 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
HCC 1425, Vancouver
POL 201 - Introductory Quantitative Methods in Political Science (3) *

Introduces quantitative research techniques in political science. Introduces important analytical and conceptual skills necessary to understand and evaluate quantitative political science research. Prerequisite: POL 200 or permission of department. Students with credit for IS 240 may not take POL 201 for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Josip Dasovic
Tu, Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCK 9500, Burnaby
D101
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5040, Burnaby
D102
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5040, Burnaby
D103
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5040, Burnaby
POL 210 - Introduction to Political Philosophy (3) *CS

An examination of concepts presented by the major political thinkers of the western world. The course surveys those ideas which remain at the root of our political institutions, practices and ideals against a background of the periods in which they were expressed. Prerequisite: POL 100 or 101W or permission of department. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 David Laycock
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 3159, Burnaby
D101
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
BLU 11901, Burnaby
D102
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
BLU 11901, Burnaby
D103
Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D104
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
BLU 10901, Burnaby
D105
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
F100 Remi Leger
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 10051, Burnaby
F101
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 7102, Burnaby
F102
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 7102, Burnaby
POL 244 - Canada in the World (3) CS

Explores Canada's identity, role and status in the world in a comparative perspective. Examines the main internal and external constraints that shape Canadian politics and policies, taking as illustrations a number of key issues and concerns.

POL 253 - Introduction to Public Policy (3) CS

Explores the political dimensions of public policy making in Canada. Reviews theories and techniques in policy analysis, and focuses on the contemporary dynamics of public policy in various economic and social sectors from the point of view of political ideas, interests, institutions, and decision-making. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Stephen Gallagher
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCC 9000, Burnaby
D101
Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
D102
Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
D103
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
D104
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5014, Burnaby
F100 Benoit D├ęcary-Secours
We 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby

*Minimum C grade required.

and all of

FREN 212 - French for Immersion Program Students (3) CS

Designed for French immersion program students who wish to refine their oral and written language competence. Instruction in class and in lab. Prerequisite: Grade 12 French immersion (or equivalent based on placement test). Students with credit for FREN 211 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sessional
Tu, Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 6206, Burnaby
FREN 221 - French Writing I (3) **CS

A reading and writing course with emphasis on vocabulary and logical structure in written expression. Instruction in class, in lab and online. Prerequisite: FREN 211 or 212, or with a grade of A, FREN 210. In the latter case, FREN 211 and 221 may be taken concurrently.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Cecile Ollivier-budisa
We, Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D200 Paola De Rycke
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 2523, Burnaby
WMC 3511, Burnaby
FREN 222 - French Writing II (3) CS

Focusing on grammar and grammatical analysis, and the process of writing. Instruction in class, in lab and online. Prerequisite: FREN 221 or, with a grade of A, FREN 211 or, with a grade of A, FREN 212.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Linda Bruneau-jolly
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 3535, Burnaby
AQ 5009, Burnaby
F100 Sessional
We, Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
FREN 245 - Introduction to Literary Studies (3)

An introduction to French literary studies with selected works in poetry and prose, including theatre. Attention will be given to methods of analysis. The course will be conducted in French. Prerequisite: FREN 222 (students with B+ in FREN 221 can take 222 concurrently with 245). Students with credit for FREN 240 or 230 cannot take FREN 245 for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jorge Calderon
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5020, Burnaby
D200 Sessional
Mo 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 5118, Burnaby
FREN 275 - French Linguistics Today (3)

Introduces to some fundamental questions about human behavior that can be answered by the study of the language forms, structure, and use. Topics such as how did language begin? Where is French from, and how did it change over the years? How does French vary from place to place, from context to context? Prerequisite: FREN 222 (students with B+ in FREN 221 can take 222 concurrently with FREN 275). Students who have credit for FREN 270 or 370 or LING 222 cannot complete this course for further credit. May not be taken concurrently with LING 222. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Christian Guilbault
Tu, Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 5120, Burnaby

**CS Students receiving advanced placement above this level may receive permission to waive or challenge it .

CS cohort specific section

Upper Division Requirements

Students complete a total of 50 units, comprised of 32 Political Science (POL) units and 18 French (FREN) units, including four of

POL 325 - Language and Politics (4) CS

Explores the relationship between language and politics, including the relations of power that shape the choice of state language(s), the origins and effects of language regimes, the politics of linguistic minorities and concerns relating to linguistic justice and equality. Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department. Students with credit for POL 329 Selected Topics in Canadian Government and Politics under the title Language and Politics may not take this course for further credit.

POL 347 - Canadian Foreign Policy (4) CS

An overview of Canadian foreign policy post World War II. Various perspectives are discussed including realism, economic nationalism, liberal internationalism and political economy/dependency analysis. A variety of analytical perspectives are used to examine issue-areas such as foreign trade including the role of NAFTA, defence policy and alliance relations, foreign investment, foreign aid, immigration policy, energy policy and the role of domestic political factors in foreign policy decision-making. Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department.

POL 351 - Immigration, Integration, and Public Policy in Canada (4) CS

Explores the governance challenges related to immigration and integration in Canada using a public policy approach. The course deals with topics concerning immigrant selection (including immigration categories, temporary/permanent Immigration, intergovernmental agreements, etc.) and focuses on immigrant's integration into society (such as nation-building strategies, integration Indicators and discrimination). Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department. Students who have taken Selected Topics course POL 359 with this topic may not take this course for further credit.

POL 359 - Selected Topics in Governance (4) CS

Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Darren Bohle
We 4:30 PM – 8:20 PM
AQ 4120, Burnaby
POL 451 - Public Policy Analysis (4) CS

Examines the conceptual, philosophical and practical aspects of public policy analysis as it is conducted in government, universities, interest groups and policy research institutes. Specific attention is paid to the question of the role of policy research in the process of public policy making and the design of government programs and services. Prerequisite: Eight upper division units in political science or permission of the department. Quantitative.

POL 459 - Selected Topics in Governance (4) CS

Prerequisite: Eight upper division units in political science or permission of the department.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
F100
We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 2503, Burnaby
POL 472 - Diplomacy and Global Governance (4) CS

Examines diplomacy and its role in global governance. Introduces students to the theory and practice of diplomacy, both bilaterally and multilaterally, with particular emphasis on how interactions between state actors and non-state actors contribute to the resolution of global problems. Prerequisite: Eight upper division units in political science or permission of the department.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
F100 Jeremie Cornut
Tu 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 2122, Burnaby
POL 497 - Experiential Learning in Political Science (4) CS

Involves interpretation of, and expansion on, practical experience in political science. Under the supervision of a faculty member, students will undertake a political science research project, involving the participation of local community organizations. Prerequisite: Permission of the department. Students may count only one POL 497 towards meeting their upper division political science requirements.

and an additional four upper division POL courses are required. Normally, two or three courses, equivalent to at least eight units, will be selected from transferable political science courses offered at the institution hosting the exchange term.

and

FREN 301W - Advanced French Composition (3)

A writing course to improve organization and argumentation, paragraph structures and lexical accuracy. Instruction in class and online. Prerequisite: FREN 222 or, with a grade of A, FREN 221. Students with credit for FREN 301 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Catherine Black
Tu 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 3531, Burnaby
AQ 5009, Burnaby
D200 Catherine Black
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5014, Burnaby
AQ 5014, Burnaby

and one course from either Group A or Group B

CS Cohort Specific

Group A

FREN 331 - Accents of French (3)

An introduction to notions paramount to the study of French accents such as linguistic norm, representations and attitudes, phoneme and allophones for instance. Analyses on short corpora will provide students a hands-on experience and will lead to discussions about relevant methodologies. Prerequisite: FREN 275 or 270 or LING 222.

FREN 332 - Social Approaches to French (3)

The aim of this course is to offer students a comprehensive view of a set of issues pertaining to the French language in society. The topics studied in class include: social categories and language variation, new technologies and language evolution, language and identity, and language ideology. Prerequisite: FREN 275 or 270 or LING 222.

FREN 333 - The Magic of French Words (3)

An introduction to the study of the form, structure, evolution and use of French words. Selected topics related to the study of French words in Morphology, Terminology, Orthography, Etymology, Diaphasic and Diatopic Varieties and Language use. Prerequisite: FREN 275 or 270 or LING 222.

FREN 334 - Topics in French Applied Linguistics (3)

The study of selected topics in French Applied Linguistics. The course may be developed around one or a combination of areas such as Computer-mediated-communication, language pathology, language socialization, translation, error analysis, language in contexts, language planning. This course may be repeated once for credit if the topic is different. Prerequisite: FREN 275 or 270 OR LING 222.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Gaelle Planchenault
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 10921, Burnaby

Group B

FREN 340 - Survey of Quebecois Literature (3)

Intermediate study of issues in Quebecois Literature. Prerequisite: FREN 245 or 240. Students with credit for FREN 230 may not take this course for further credit.

FREN 341 - Survey of French Literature to 1600 (3)

Survey of works, themes, or movements in French Literature from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. Prerequisite: FREN 245 or 230 or 240.

FREN 344 - Survey of French Literature after 1789 (3)

An introduction to the history of French literature from the late eighteenth century to the late twentieth century. Prerequisite: FREN 245 or 230 or 240.

FREN 345 - Survey of French Literature from 1600 to 1789 (3)

A survey of works, themes, or movements in French literature of the 17th and 18th centuries. Prerequisite: FREN 301W; FREN 245, 230, or 240.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Somayeh Kamranian
Tu 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 5120, Burnaby
RCB 5120, Burnaby

and one of

FREN 425 - Topics in the Varieties of French (3)

Study of selected topics in French dialectal variation. Subject matter may include, but is not limited to, French Dialects, Canadian French and French Creoles. Prerequisite: FREN 270 or 275 or LING 222, FREN 301W, and at least one 300-level group A (ling.) course. Students with credit for FREN 421 and/or 422 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Anne Bertrand
Fr 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5004, Burnaby
FREN 452 - Topics in French and Francophone Cultures or Cinemas (3)

Study of selected topics relating to French and Francophone cultures or films. Prerequisite: FREN 230 or 240 or 245, FREN 270 or 275 or LING 222, FREN 301W, and at least one 300-level group A (ling.) or group B (lit.) course.

and nine units of 300 and 400 division French (FREN) courses.

Additional Cohort Requirements

Students must complete the following courses, although other appropriate courses may occasionally be substituted.

One of

HIST 102W - Canada since Confederation (3) CS

Canadian social, political, and economic history from 1867, examining aboriginal/settler relations, immigration, regionalism, foreign policy, economic development, culture, and political movements. Students with credit for HIST 102 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mark Leier
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 3520, Burnaby
D101
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
D102
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
D103
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5047, Burnaby
D104
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5035, Burnaby
D105
We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 4125, Burnaby
D106
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 2523, Burnaby
D107
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
D108
We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
D109
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D110
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
D111
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D112
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
F100 Nicolas Kenny
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5020, Burnaby
HIST 214 - Quebec Society, Culture, and Politics (3) CS

Covers Quebec history from the French regime to the recent past, focusing on the evolution of cultural identity, on the nationalist movement, and on the long-standing tension between tradition and modernity. Students who have credit for HIST 328 may not take HIST 214 for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
F100 Nicolas Kenny
Mo 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 5118, Burnaby

and one of

HIST 430 - French Americas (4) CS

Social, cultural, intellectual, economic, and political aspects of the French and Francophone presence in the Americas, from the colonial era to the present. Prerequisite: 45 units, including nine units of lower division history or permission of the instructor. Recommended: HIST 101, 102W, 104.

HIST 436 - British Columbia (4) CS

Selected problems in the social, cultural, economic and political development of British Columbia. Prerequisite: 45 units including nine units of lower division history. Recommended: HIST 101 and 102W.

FCP students are required to complete a minimum of 75 units of courses taught in French, including courses taken at a francophone university.

Canadian college and university transfer students and SFU students who wish to change programs will normally have to complete the required minimum of 75 units of courses taught in French. Exceptions to this requirement may be made following a French language assessment and/or if a Lower Division course equivalence is granted. Where completion of the FCP is permitted with fewer than 75 units of courses taught in French, of the normally reguired 33 Lower Division units for courses taught in French, a minimum of 9 units in Political Science, 6 units in French and 3 units in History must be completed. All required Upper Division courses taught in French must be taken. Final decision is made by the FCP administration in agreement with the departments.

CS Cohort Specific

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Degree Requirements

For all bachelor of arts (BA) programs, students complete 120 units, which includes

  • at least 60 units that must be completed at Simon Fraser University
  • at least 45 upper division units, of which at least 30 upper division units must be completed at Simon Fraser University
  • at least 65 units (including 21 upper division units) in Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences courses
  • satisfaction of the writing, quantitative, and breadth requirements
  • an overall cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and upper division CGPA of at least 2.0, and a program (major, joint major, extended minor, minor) CGPA and upper division CGPA of at least 2.0

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student’s major subject
Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth Must be outside the student’s major subject, and may be lower or upper division
6 units Social Sciences: B-Soc
6 units Humanities: B-Hum
6 units Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth 6 units outside the student’s major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements)

Students choosing to complete a joint major, joint honours, double major, two extended minors, an extended minor and a minor, or two minors may satisfy the breadth requirements (designated or not designated) with courses completed in either one or both program areas.

 

Residency Requirements and Transfer Credit

  • At least half of the program's total units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.
  • At least two thirds of the program's total upper division units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.

Elective Courses

In addition to the courses listed above, students should consult an academic advisor to plan the remaining required elective courses.