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Department of Gerontology Simon Fraser University Calendar | Spring 2018

Gerontology

Post Baccalaureate Diploma

This program, for those with a bachelor’s degree who are working or plan to work with the elderly, provides a broadly based, multidisciplinary perspective on aging as well as requisite knowledge and skills for meaningful intervention and application of research findings to practice.

Admission Requirements

  • completion of a bachelor’s degree from a recognized university with a minimum graduation grade point average of 2.5
  • three reference letters attesting to personal qualities and characteristics, ability to complete a post baccalaureate program, and career potential and dedication to the gerontology field. Obtain an application package from the program office including letter of reference forms, program information and a separate application to the gerontology diploma program.

Consult the department for information on application.

Program Requirements

Successful completion of 32 units, as laid out below.

A 2.5 CGPA is required on courses applied toward the diploma. Students entering without experience of working directly with older persons in a job or volunteer setting may be required to complete a practicum. A criminal record check is required prior to starting the practicum.

Most diploma program courses have prerequisites that should be completed before enrolling in the program. Contact the program advisor for information on prerequisites and general program requirements.

Courses other than those listed below may be designated for gerontology diploma credit from term to term. Check with the department for this course list.

Students complete all of

Required Courses

Students complete a minimum of 17 units, including all of

GERO 300 - Introduction to Gerontology (3) *

Examination of the aging process from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Physical and health factors in aging, economic and vocational factors in aging, family and community relations of older people, social policy and politics of aging. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on normal aging. Prerequisite: 60 units. Students who have taken GERO 101 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Sarah Canham
Mo 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
GERO 420 - Sociology of Aging (4)

The structural and behavioral implications of aging. Topics include demographic aspects of aging; the relationship of aging to political, economic, familial and other social institutions; the psychological significance of aging. Prerequisite: 60 units. Recommended: GERO 300. Students with credit for SA 420 and students may not take this course for further credit.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
or SA 420 - Sociology of Aging (S) (4)

The structural and behavioral implications of aging. Topics included will be: demographic aspects of aging; the relationship of aging to political, economic, familial and other social institutions; the psychological significance of aging. Prerequisite: 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or SA 201W, or acceptance into the diploma program in gerontology, or by consent of instructor. This course is identical to GERO 420 and students cannot take both courses for credit. Students may use GERO 420 to fulfil their major or minor requirements in lieu of SA 420.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
GERO 450 - Evaluation of Health Programs for Older Adults (4)

How to design, implement and evaluate health and social programs and services for older adults. Divergent theoretical and methodological perspectives including process and impact evaluation methods will be covered. Prerequisite: 60 units. GERO 301 or PSYC 201 or SA 255 or HSCI 307. Recommended: GERO 101 or 300. Students must successfully complete a Criminal Record Check.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Susan Crawford
We 4:30 PM – 8:20 PM
HCC 2925, Vancouver
PSYC 357 - Adulthood and Aging (3)

Considers human development from young adulthood to old age. Included are theories of adult development and aging; environmental and biological factors in aging; and the effects of aging on sensation, perception, learning, cognition, personality, psychopathology, and social relations. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 250 or acceptance into the diploma program in gerontology.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Wendy Loken Thornton
Tu 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 3159, Burnaby

and one of

GERO 301 - Research Methods in Gerontology (3) ^, *

This course examines research methodology applied to the field of gerontology. Key areas covered include: operationalizing gerontological concepts; sampling older populations; longitudinal designs; outcome and process evaluation of seniors' programs; and elementary data analyses. Prerequisite: 60 units.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
PSYC 301 - Intermediate Research Methods and Data Analysis (4) *

A continuation of PSYC 201 and 210. Provides extensions of the basic theory and methods of research design and data analysis. Includes discussions of the analysis of substantive problems, the choice of appropriate research designs, and special problems that arise in the analysis of psychological data. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 210 and a minimum CGPA of 2.67. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Michael Maraun
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5018, Burnaby
D101
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 3515, Burnaby
D102
Tu 9:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
SA 355 - Quantitative Methods (S) (4) *

Examines the methods, concepts and statistical procedures central to quantitative sociological research. Emphasizing the meaningful application of statistical analysis to social issues, the course provides intermediate quantitative research skills. Students use statistics software to conduct applicable statistical analyses and interpret results. Prerequisite: SA 255 and SA 257. Students with credit for SA 355 may not take POL 315 for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Suzanna Crage
Mo 9:30 AM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5040, Burnaby

or any other approved research methodology course*

* should be completed at the beginning of the program

^, * recommended and should be completed at the beginning of the program.

Elective Courses

Students complete a minimum of 15 units from the following list of courses

BPK 461 - Physiological Aspects of Aging (3)

Designed for those who require a serious but fairly broad discussion of specific physiological aspects of aging. The overall emphasis is on humans and other mammalian species and the varieties of aging changes they manifest. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 105 or 205 (formerly KIN 100), 142 and 90 units. Students with credit for KIN 461 may not repeat this course for credit.

EDUC 351 - Teaching the Older Adult (3)

This is a basic course in adult education for students from all disciplines, of particular interest to those working (or preparing to work) with older adults. The goal is to assist students to develop more effective strategies for meeting the needs of an aging population through education. Prerequisite: 60 units.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
C200 Distance Education
GERO 302 - Health Promotion and Aging (3)

This course includes an examination of the development of contemporary understanding and practice of health promotion. Students will be given the opportunity to explore theories and models designed to explain health related behaviors and the determinants of health. Strategies for behavioral change and development of socio-environmental approaches will be discussed in the context of an aging Canadian population. Prerequisite: 60 units. Recommended: GERO 300.

GERO 401 - Environment and Aging (3)

Impact of the macro- and microenvironment as it affects the aged. Discussion of planned housing and institutional living arrangements, territoriality and the need for privacy, home range and use of space, urban planning, responsive design of housing and care facilities, effects of relocation and institutionalization. Prerequisite: 60 units. Recommended: GERO 300.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Atiya Mahmood
Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
HCC 2205, Vancouver
GERO 403 - Counselling Issues with Older Adults (3)

An examination of the ways of adapting counselling theory and practice to meet the needs of older adults and their families. Emphasis will be placed on counselling techniques and outcomes appropriate to the needs of persons living independently, with their families, or in institutional settings. Prerequisite: GERO 300 and PSYC 357 or GERO 420.

GERO 404 - Health and Illness in Later Life (3)

An examination of issues related to health and illness among older adults, drawing upon theories and concepts from biological, social and public health sciences. An introduction to assessment and intervention skills useful to persons working with older adults in a broad range of practice settings. Prerequisite: 60 units, GERO 300.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sharon Koehn
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
HCC 2205, Vancouver
GERO 406 - Death and Dying (3)

The focus of this course is to provide the student with an in-depth understanding of the process of dying. By examining the process of dying, one's personal response to death as well as society's reaction and responsibilities toward dying, the student will gain new insights in caring for the dying person. Prerequisite: 60 units. Recommended: GERO 300.

GERO 407 - Nutrition and Aging (3)

This course examines specific nutritional conditions and concerns of the aging population. It does so by exploring the nutrient needs of the elderly as determined by physiological changes of aging, metabolic effects of common diseases, and biochemical interactions of medications. The course includes a broad investigation of the psychological, sociological, and physical factors which influence food choice and ultimately nutritional status in aging. Prerequisite: 60 units and GERO 300 or KIN 110.

GERO 408 - Families over the Life Course (4)

This course entails a comprehensive interdisciplinary study of families and aging. In addition to providing an overview of theory and research on this topic, a variety of substantive issues will be critically examined, including: families in mid life, sibling relationships, divorce and remarriage, dating in later life, care giving, poverty, elder abuse, and policy development. Prerequisite: 60 units. Recommended: GERO 300.

GERO 409 - Mental Health and Aging (3)

Psychopathology often presents in distinct ways among older adults. The intent of this course is to examine disorders with their onset in later life and those that extend into later years. Students will derive an understanding of the diagnostic criteria for various disorders, prevalence, theories of etiology, and selected empirically validated interventions. Prerequisite: GERO 300. Recommended: GERO 403, PSYC 241. Students with credit for GERO 411, when the course was offered under this title, may not take this course for further credit.

GERO 410 - Special Topics in Gerontology I (3)

Selected psychological, sociological, economic, biological and practical aspects of the aging of individuals and populations. Prerequisite: 60 units. Recommended: GERO 300.

GERO 411 - Special Topics in Gerontology II (3)

Selected psychological, sociological, economic, biological and practical aspects of the aging of individuals and populations. Prerequisite: 60 units. Recommended: GERO 300.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sharon Koehn
We 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
HCC 1505, Vancouver
GERO 412 - Special Topics in Gerontology III (3)

Selected psychological, sociological, economic, biological and practical aspects of the aging of individuals and populations. Prerequisite: 60 units. Recommended: GERO 300.

GERO 413 - Sexuality and Aging (3)

Focuses on all aspects of sex and aging and the issues that arise around sexual behavior as we age. An interdisciplinary perspective, taking into account the physiological, psychological, interpersonal and social influences which shape our understanding of sexuality in the aged. Prerequisite: Recommended: GERO 101 or 300. Students who have completed this topic under GERO 410 may not complete this course for further credit.

SA 319 - Transnational Aging (A) (4)

Explores how mobility and migration across borders influence the lives of older people, with attention to how multigenerational transnational families mutually negotiate care and support. Political and socio-cultural factors will be examined through case studies from around the world in order to assess how we age in a transnational world. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Parin Dossa
Tu, Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7100, Burnaby