Please note:

To view the Fall 2017 Academic Calendar go to http://www.sfu.ca/students/calendar/2017/fall.html

Department of Biomedical Physiology & Kinesiology Simon Fraser University Calendar | Spring 2018

Kinesiology Major

Bachelor of Science

This bachelor of science (BSc) degree offers students the option of completing either the Active Health and Rehabilitation Concentration, or completing the general program instead.

The program is accredited with the Canadian Council of University Physical Education and Kinesiology Administrators (CCUPEKA).

Please read descriptions of required BPK courses before enrolling in the program.

Note that students cannot combine a double major, nor a double minor, nor a major/minor program in the areas of kinesiology, biomedical physiology and behavioural neuroscience.

Admission Requirements

Bachelor of Science Program entry is possible via

  • direct admission from high school
  • transfer from a recognized post-secondary institution
  • internal transfer from within Simon Fraser University

Admission is competitive. A separate admission average for each of the three entry routes is established each term, depending on spaces available and subject to the dean’s approval.

Direct Admission from High School

For information, see the Admission website for information.

Post-secondary Transfer

Students transferring to Simon Fraser University for the kinesiology major will first transfer into the Faculty of Science. Students may then apply for admission to the kinesiology major program through the internal transfer process as outlined below.

Internal Transfer

Simon Fraser University students applying for admission to the kinesiology major program must complete the following courses with a grade of C- or better.

Students complete all of

  • BISC 101 General Biology (4)
  • CHEM 121 General Chemistry and Laboratory I (4)
  • BPK 142 Introduction to Kinesiology (3)

and one of

  • MATH 150 Calculus I with Review (4)
  • MATH 151 Calculus I (3)
  • MATH 154 Calculus I for the Biological Sciences (3)

and one of

  • PHYS 101 Physics for the Life Sciences I (3)
  • PHYS 120 Mechanics and Modern Physics (3)
  • PHYS 125 Mechanics and Special Relativity (3)
  • PHYS 140 Studio Physics - Mechanics and Modern Physics (4)

Applicants are selected based on an admission grade point average (GPA) calculated over these five required courses, together with any of

  • CHEM 122 General Chemistry II (2)
  • CHEM 281 Organic Chemistry I (4)
  • BPK 201 Biomechanics (3)
  • BPK 205 Introduction to Human Physiology (3)
  • BPK 207 Sensorimotor Control and Learning (3)
  • STAT 201 Statistics for the Life Sciences (3)

and one of

  • MBB 201 Biochemistry of the Cell (3)
  • MBB 231 Cellular Biology and Biochemistry (3)

and one of

  • MATH 152 Calculus II (3)
  • MATH 155 Calculus II for the Biological Sciences (3)

and one of

  • PHYS 102 Physics for the Life Sciences II (3)
  • PHYS 121 Optics, Electricity and Magnetism (3)
  • PHYS 126 Electricity, Magnetism and Light (3)
  • PHYS 141 Studio Physics - Optics, Electricity and Magnetism (4)

Apply for admission as soon as the five required courses have been completed. Unsuccessful applicants may complete a minimum of four courses from the nine additional courses to improve the admission GPA. A C- grade or better is required in each course used for the admission application. Those not meeting the biomedical physiology and kinesiology admission GPA upon completion of all nine additional courses will be advised of alternatives. All courses completed towards the program will be included in the application process.

For students transferring some core courses from another post-secondary institution, only courses completed at Simon Fraser University (and not previously completed elsewhere) are used in the biomedical physiology and kinesiology admission GPA.

Normally, at least 15 units from core courses are required as a basis for the GPA calculation. Exceptions must be approved by the department.

Application Procedure

Students should complete a program approval form available at the biomedical physiology and kinesiology general office and submit it to the academic advisor by June 1 for fall term approval, October 1 for spring term approval, or February 1 for summer term approval.

 

Prerequisite and Required Course Grades

Students enrolling in biomedical physiology and kinesiology courses must have a grade of C- or better in prerequisite courses. Students enrolled in kinesiology certificate, minor, major (including concentrations), honours, second degree, and post baccalaureate diploma programs must have grade of C- or better in all required courses.

Continuance Requirement

After a student has completed 24 credits, a Science cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of not less than 2.50 is required for continuance in the major. Students, whose Science CGPA falls below 2.50, will be sent a warning letter and if at the end of the subsequent term the Science CGPA is less than 2.50, these students shall be withdrawn from the BIF or KIN Major. Students who have completed 90 or more units and whose Science CGPA falls below a 2.50, but is at least 2.00, will be allowed to complete their Biomedical Physiology or Kinesiology major. Students must achieve a minimum of a C- grade in all required courses.

Additional Clarification will be posted on BPK's websites

http://www.sfu.ca/bpk/undergrad_program/faqs/continuancegpa.html

Program Requirements

Students complete 120 units, as specified below.

Program planners for majors are posted on the BPK webiste www.sfu.ca/bpk/undergrad_program/forms.html.

Lower Division Requirements

The program’s lower division requirements are structured as a common core set, an additional set of courses for the Kinesiology General Program, or the optional Active Health and Rehabilitation Concentration, and general elective courses that include the University's breadth requirements.

Students complete all of the following.

Core Courses

BISC 101 - General Biology (4)

An introduction to the biochemical and physiological mechanisms of living organisms. Topics covered include cell structure and function, DNA replication and the flow of genetic information, enzyme function, metabolism and physiology of microorganisms, plants, and animals. Prerequisite: High school biology 12 (or equivalent) with a C grade or better, or BISC 100 with C- or better, or BISC 113 with C+ or better, or HSCI 100 with C+ or better. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kevin Lam
Peter Hollmann
Zamir Punja
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Th 9:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
D101 Peter Hollmann
Tu 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCB 8206, Burnaby
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D102 Peter Hollmann
Tu 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SSCB 8210, Burnaby
RCB 7100, Burnaby
D103 Peter Hollmann
Tu 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCB 8206, Burnaby
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D104 Peter Hollmann
Tu 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SSCB 8210, Burnaby
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D105 Peter Hollmann
Tu 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCB 8206, Burnaby
AQ 4125, Burnaby
D106 Peter Hollmann
Tu 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCB 8210, Burnaby
AQ 4125, Burnaby
D107 Peter Hollmann
We 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCB 8206, Burnaby
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D108 Peter Hollmann
We 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SSCB 8210, Burnaby
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D109 Peter Hollmann
We 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCB 8206, Burnaby
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D110 Peter Hollmann
We 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SSCB 8210, Burnaby
RCB 7100, Burnaby
D111 Peter Hollmann
We 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCB 8206, Burnaby
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D112 Peter Hollmann
We 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
Fr 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCB 8210, Burnaby
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D113 Peter Hollmann
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Th 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5014, Burnaby
SSCB 8206, Burnaby
D114 Peter Hollmann
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
Th 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
WMC 2531, Burnaby
SSCB 8210, Burnaby
D115 Peter Hollmann
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Th 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5016, Burnaby
SSCB 8206, Burnaby
D116 Peter Hollmann
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Th 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5004, Burnaby
SSCB 8210, Burnaby
CHEM 121 - General Chemistry and Laboratory I (4)

Atomic and molecular structure; chemical bonding; thermochemistry; elements; periodic table; gases liquids, solids, and solutions. This course includes a laboratory component. Prerequisite: BC high school chemistry 12 or CHEM 109 or CHEM 111. Students may not count both CHEM 120 and 121 for credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tim Storr
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
We, Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
D101
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 7100, Burnaby
D102
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 2104, Burnaby
D103
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 2104, Burnaby
D104
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SECB 1013, Burnaby
D105
Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
RCB 5118, Burnaby
D106
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 5118, Burnaby
D107
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 5120, Burnaby
D108
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5008, Burnaby
D109
Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 5118, Burnaby
D110
Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 5118, Burnaby
D111
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
BLU 9655, Burnaby
D112
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 9655, Burnaby
LA04 Sessional
We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LA06 Sessional
Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LB04 Sessional
We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LB06 Sessional
Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LE01
TBD
CHEM 122 - General Chemistry II (2)

Chemical equilibria; electrochemistry; chemical thermodynamics; kinetics. Students who intend to take further laboratory courses in chemistry should take CHEM 122 concurrently with CHEM 126. Prerequisite: CHEM 121 or 120. Recommended: MATH 152 (or 155) and PHYS 121 (or 102) as a corequisite. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 John Canal
Mo, We, Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
D101
We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
TASC2 8500, Burnaby
D102
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
TASC2 8500, Burnaby
D103
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
TASC2 8500, Burnaby
D104
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2532, Burnaby
D105
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 7100, Burnaby
D106
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SECB 1011, Burnaby
D107
We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
BLU 10011, Burnaby
D108
Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5039, Burnaby
D109
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
BLU 9655, Burnaby
D110
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
D111
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5039, Burnaby
D112
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
D200
We, Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 2600, Surrey
D201
Mo 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SUR 2980, Surrey
D202
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SUR 2980, Surrey
D203
Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 2980, Surrey
D204
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 2980, Surrey
D205
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SUR 2980, Surrey
D206
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 2980, Surrey
D300
We, Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 2600, Surrey
D301
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SUR 2980, Surrey
CHEM 281 - Organic Chemistry I (4)

Structure, bonding, physical and chemical properties of simple organic compounds. Introduction to spectroscopy. Kinetics and mechanisms of organic reactions. This course includes a laboratory component. Prerequisite: CHEM 121. Corequisite: CHEM 122. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Andrew Bennet
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 3182, Burnaby
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
D101
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5039, Burnaby
D102
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
TASC2 8500, Burnaby
D104
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 5120, Burnaby
D105
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 5118, Burnaby
D107
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 5120, Burnaby
D108
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 3250, Burnaby
D110
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
D111
Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
LA03 Uwe Kreis
Tu 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSB 8120, Burnaby
LA04 Uwe Kreis
We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSB 8120, Burnaby
LA06 Uwe Kreis
Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSB 8120, Burnaby
LA07 Uwe Kreis
Fr 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSB 8120, Burnaby
LB03 Uwe Kreis
Tu 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSB 8120, Burnaby
LB04 Uwe Kreis
We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSB 8120, Burnaby
LB06 Uwe Kreis
Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSB 8120, Burnaby
LE01
TBD
BPK 142 - Introduction to Kinesiology (3)

Basic procedures for the assessment of the status and performance of the individual according to the principles of anthropometry, functional anatomy, biomechanics, exercise physiology, and motor learning. Prerequisite: Recommended: Grade 11 Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Students with credit for KIN 142 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jim Carter
Tu, Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
D101
We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCK 8640, Burnaby
D102
We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCK 8640, Burnaby
D103
We 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SSCK 8640, Burnaby
D104
We 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCK 8640, Burnaby
D105
Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCK 8640, Burnaby
D106
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCK 8640, Burnaby
D107
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCK 8640, Burnaby
D108
Fr 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCK 8640, Burnaby
D109
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCK 8640, Burnaby
D110
Fr 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SSCK 8640, Burnaby
D200 Mike Walsh
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 2750, Surrey
D201 Mike Walsh
We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 2970, Surrey
D202 Mike Walsh
We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 2970, Surrey
D203 Mike Walsh
We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 2970, Surrey
BPK 143 - Exercise: Health and Performance (3)

Introduces the student to exercise physiology. Focuses on personal exercise prescription to improve aerobic capacity, muscular strength and endurance, and flexibility. Also discusses athletic conditioning, e.g. speed and power training. The effects of nutritional and environmental factors on exercise and the role of exercise in weight control and stress management are considered. Prerequisite: Recommended: medical clearance from a personal physician. Students with credit for KIN 143 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tony Leyland
Mo, We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SWH 10041, Burnaby
D101
Mo, We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
GYM 191, Burnaby
D102
Mo, We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
GYM 191, Burnaby
D103
Mo, We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
GYM 191, Burnaby
BPK 201 - Biomechanics (3)

This course will cover the application of basic mechanics to human movement. It will provide students with a basic understanding of how forces act on body segments and how movements are produced. The subject matter of this course is relevant to quantifying all forms of physical activity, from activities of daily living, physically challenged movement patterns, to elite athletic performance. It also has applications in medical settings, including rehabilitation and sports medicine. Prerequisite: MATH 150, 151 or 154, MATH 152 or 155 (may be taken concurrently), PHYS 101 (or 120 or 125 or 140), BPK (or KIN) 142. Students with credit for KIN 201 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tony Leyland
Mo, We 4:30 PM – 5:50 PM
SSCC 9002, Burnaby
D101
Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D102
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D103
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
BLU 11911, Burnaby
D104
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D105
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 7101, Burnaby
D106
We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
BPK 205 - Introduction to Human Physiology (3)

An introductory survey of human physiology with an emphasis on mechanisms of regulation and integration. Anatomy of structures will be detailed only when it is critical to a functional understanding. Although this is intended as a survey course, some topics will be covered in reasonable detail in order to give insight into mechanisms of function. BPK (or KIN) 208 may not be used as a substitute for BPK (or KIN) 205 by students in the Kinesiology Major and Honors programs. Kinesiology majors and honors students who have taken BPK (or KIN) 105 must also take BPK (or KIN) 205. For students taking both of these courses, credit will only be given for BPK (or KIN) 205. Prerequisite: BISC 101, CHEM 281, PHYS 101 and 102. Students with credit for KIN 205 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nadine Wicks
Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 3520, Burnaby
AQ 3181, Burnaby
WMC 3260, Burnaby
D101
Mo 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5009, Burnaby
D102
Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D103
We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5009, Burnaby
D104
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
D105
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5014, Burnaby
D106
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
BPK 207 - Sensorimotor Control and Learning (3)

Students are introduced to basic concepts in the sensorimotor planning and control of movement. Topics include the factors and disorders affecting movement, sensory and motor physiology, sensorimotor integration, current theories of motor control, and motor learning. Taught from a behavioral and neurophysiological perspective that explores psychological influences on motor control. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 142 or permission of instructor. Students with credit for KIN 207 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Dylan Cooke
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 3182, Burnaby
BLU 9660, Burnaby
D101
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCK 8650, Burnaby
D102
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SSCK 8650, Burnaby
D103
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCK 8650, Burnaby
D104
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SSCK 8650, Burnaby
D105
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCK 8650, Burnaby
D106
Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SSCK 8650, Burnaby
STAT 201 - Statistics for the Life Sciences (3)

Research methodology and associated statistical analysis techniques for students with training in the life sciences. Intended to be particularly accessible to students who are not specializing in Statistics. Students cannot obtain credit for STAT 201 if they already have credit for - or are taking concurrently - STAT 101, 203, 285, or any upper division STAT course. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D900 Jack Davis
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 2600, Surrey
SUR 2600, Surrey
OP09
TBD

and one of

MBB 201 - Biochemistry of the Cell (3)

An introduction to cellular processes with an emphasis on protein structure and function. Topics that will be explored include transcription, translation and protein synthesis, basic metabolic pathways, biomembranes, organelles, vesicle transport, the cytoskeleton and cell signaling. Prerequisite: BISC 101; CHEM 281 as prerequisite or corequisite.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Frederic Pio
Mo, Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
EDB 7618, Burnaby
SSCK 9500, Burnaby
D101
We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 3255, Burnaby
D102
We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 7100, Burnaby
D103
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 3533, Burnaby
D104
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 3533, Burnaby
D105
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5007, Burnaby
MBB 231 - Cellular Biology and Biochemistry (3)

A study of the molecular processes which underlie cell structure and function, integrating ultrastructural, physiological and biochemical approaches. Modern techniques used in the analysis of organelle and cell function are integral parts of the course. Prerequisite: MBB 222, BISC 101, CHEM 281 with grades of C- or better. Corequisite or Prerequisite: CHEM 282 or CHEM 283.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Michael Silverman
Mo, We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
DFA 300, Burnaby
D101
Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 2104, Burnaby
D102
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 2104, Burnaby
D103
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5008, Burnaby
D104
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5007, Burnaby
D105
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
D106
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 2104, Burnaby
D107
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
BLU 10031, Burnaby
D108
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 5118, Burnaby

and one of

MATH 150 - Calculus I with Review (4)

Designed for students specializing in mathematics, physics, chemistry, computing science and engineering. Topics as for Math 151 with a more extensive review of functions, their properties and their graphs. Recommended for students with no previous knowledge of Calculus. In addition to regularly scheduled lectures, students enrolled in this course are encouraged to come for assistance to the Calculus Workshop (Burnaby), or Math Open Lab (Surrey). Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least B+, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least B-, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 151, 154 or 157 may not take MATH 150 for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100
Mo, Tu, We, Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
WMC 3520, Burnaby
D200
Mo, We, Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 2750, Surrey
SUR 2750, Surrey
OP01
TBD
OP02
TBD
MATH 151 - Calculus I (3)

Designed for students specializing in mathematics, physics, chemistry, computing science and engineering. Logarithmic and exponential functions, trigonometric functions, inverse functions. Limits, continuity, and derivatives. Techniques of differentiation, including logarithmic and implicit differentiation. The Mean Value Theorem. Applications of differentiation including extrema, curve sketching, Newton's method. Introduction to modeling with differential equations. Polar coordinates, parametric curves. Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least A, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least B, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 150, 154 or 157 may not take MATH 151 for further credit. Quantitative.

MATH 154 - Calculus I for the Biological Sciences (3)

Designed for students specializing in the biological and medical sciences. Topics include: limits, growth rate and the derivative; elementary functions, optimization and approximation methods, and their applications; mathematical models of biological processes. Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least B, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least C, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 150, 151 or 157 may not take MATH 154 for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ladislav Stacho
Mo 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
We, Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
OP01
TBD

and one of

MATH 152 - Calculus II (3)

Riemann sum, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, definite, indefinite and improper integrals, approximate integration, integration techniques, applications of integration. First-order separable differential equations and growth models. Sequences and series, series tests, power series, convergence and applications of power series. Prerequisite: MATH 150 or 151; or MATH 154 or 157 with a grade of at least B. Students with credit for MATH 155 or 158 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Brenda Davison
Mo, We, Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
D200
Mo, We, Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 5280, Surrey
D300
Mo, We, Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
WMC 2810, Burnaby
OP01
TBD
OP02
TBD
MATH 155 - Calculus II for the Biological Sciences (3)

Designed for students specializing in the biological and medical sciences. Topics include: the integral, partial derivatives, differential equations, linear systems, and their applications; mathematical models of biological processes. Prerequisite: MATH 150, 151 or 154; or MATH 157 with a grade of at least B. Students with credit for MATH 152 or 158 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Petr Lisonek
Mo, We, Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
D200 Natalia Kouzniak
Mo, We, Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SUR 5280, Surrey
OP01
TBD
OP02
TBD

and one of

PHYS 101 - Physics for the Life Sciences I (3)

Force and motion, conservation of energy and momentum, fluids, properties of soft matter and thermal physics with applications taken from the life sciences. Prerequisite: BC Principles of Physics 12 or PHYS 100 or equivalent, with a minimum grade of C-. This prerequisite may be waived, at the discretion of the department, as determined by the student's performance on a regularly scheduled PHYS 100 final exam. Please consult the physics advisor for further details. Corequisite: MATH 150 or 151 or 154 or 157; BISC 100 or 101 or 102. Students with credit for PHYS 120, 125 or 140 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Karen kavanagh
Mo, We, Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
D101
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2531, Burnaby
D102
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
WMC 2523, Burnaby
D103
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2521, Burnaby
D104
Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 2521, Burnaby
D105
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 11911, Burnaby
D106
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D107
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5005, Burnaby
D108
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D109
We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D110
We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D111
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
D112
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D113
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D114
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D115
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 4125, Burnaby
D116
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D117
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5008, Burnaby
D118
Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
D200 Eldon Emberly
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SUR 2975, Surrey
SUR 2975, Surrey
D201 Eldon Emberly
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 2975, Surrey
PHYS 120 - Mechanics and Modern Physics (3)

A general calculus-based introduction to mechanics. Topics include translational and rotational motion, momentum, energy, gravitation, and selected topics in modern physics. Prerequisite: BC Principles of Physics 12 or PHYS 100 or equivalent, with a minimum grade of C-. This prerequisite may be waived, at the discretion of the department, as determined by the student's performance on a regularly scheduled PHYS 100 final exam. Please consult the physics advisor for further details. Corequisite: MATH 150 or 151 or 154 must precede or be taken concurrently. Students with credit for PHYS 101, 125 or 140 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Erol Girt
Mo, We, Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 3181, Burnaby
D101
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
TASC2 7201, Burnaby
D102
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
BLU 10901, Burnaby
D103
Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
D104
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 7101, Burnaby
D105
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D106
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5008, Burnaby
D107
We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7101, Burnaby
D108
We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 6100, Burnaby
D109
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
D110
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D111
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D112
Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
PHYS 125 - Mechanics and Special Relativity (3)

An enriched course in mechanics for students with good preparation in physics and mathematics. Special relativity and classical topics such as translational and rotational dynamics and conservation laws will be given a much more sophisticated treatment than in our other first-year courses. Prerequisite: Permission of the department. Co-requisite: MATH 125 or MATH 151. Students with credit for PHYS 101, 120 or PHYS 140 may not take PHYS 125 for further credit. Quantitative.

PHYS 140 - Studio Physics - Mechanics and Modern Physics (4)

A general calculus-based introduction to mechanics taught in an integrated lecture-laboratory environment. Topics include translational and rotational motion, momentum, energy, gravitation, and selected topics in modern physics. Prerequisite: BC Principles of Physics 12, or PHYS 100 or equivalent, with a minimum grade of C-. Corequisite: MATH 150 or 151 or 154 must precede or be taken concurrently. Students with credit for PHYS 125 or 120 or 101 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

and one of

PHYS 102 - Physics for the Life Sciences II (3)

Waves and optics; electricity and magnetism; modern physics emphasizing radioactivity, with applications taken from the life sciences. Prerequisite: PHYS 101 or 120 or 125 or 140 and MATH 154 or 150 or 151 or 157, all with a minimum grade of C-. Corequisite: BISC 100 or 101 or 102. Recommended Corequisites: MATH 152, 155 or 158, PHYS 130. Students with credit for PHYS 121, 126, or 141 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sarah Johnson
Mo, We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
D101
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
D102
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
D104
Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
BLU 11911, Burnaby
D105
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 10901, Burnaby
D106
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5047, Burnaby
D107
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D108
We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D109
We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 7105, Burnaby
D110
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D111
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
TASC2 7201, Burnaby
D112
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
TASC2 7201, Burnaby
D113
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
TASC2 7201, Burnaby
D114
Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
TASC2 7201, Burnaby
D115
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 3513, Burnaby
OP01
We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCP 9416, Burnaby
PHYS 121 - Optics, Electricity and Magnetism (3)

A general calculus-based introduction to electricity, magnetism and optics. Topics include electricity, magnetism, simple circuits, optics and topics from applied physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 120 or 125 or 140 (or PHYS 101 with a grade of A or B). Corequisite: MATH 152 or 155 must precede or be taken concurrently. Students with credit for PHYS 102, 126 or 141 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Levon Pogosian
Paul Haljan
Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 3182, Burnaby
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
D101
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D102
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 7101, Burnaby
D103
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D104
We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D105
We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 5100, Burnaby
D106
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D107
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D108
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D109
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D110
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D111
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D112
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D113
Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
PHYS 126 - Electricity, Magnetism and Light (3)

An enriched course in electromagnetism for students with good preparation in physics and mathematics. Classical topics such as waves, electricity and magnetism, as well as wave particle duality and the birth of Quantum Mechanics, will be given a much more sophisticated treatment than in our other first year courses. Prerequisite: PHYS 125 and permission of the department. Co-requisite: MATH 126 or MATH 152. Students with credit in PHYS 102, 121 or 141 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mike Hayden
Mo, We, Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5006, Burnaby
D101
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5030, Burnaby
PHYS 141 - Studio Physics - Optics, Electricity and Magnetism (4)

A general calculus-based introduction to electricity, magnetism and optics taught in an integrated lecture-laboratory environment. Topics include electricity, magnetism, simple circuits, optics and topics from applied physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 120 or PHYS 125 or PHYS 140, with a minimum grade of C- (or PHYS 101 with a minimum grade of B). Corequisite: MATH 152 or 155 must precede or be taken concurrently. Students with credit for PHYS 126 or 121 or 102 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Neil Alberding
Mo, We, Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SUR 2975, Surrey
D101 Neil Alberding
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 2975, Surrey
D200 Neil Alberding
Mo, We, Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 2975, Surrey
D201 Neil Alberding
Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SUR 2975, Surrey
LA01 Neil Alberding
We, Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 2975, Surrey
LA02 Neil Alberding
We, Fr 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SUR 2975, Surrey

Kinesiology General Program

Students who choose the Kinesiology General Program will complete

One of

BPK 110 - Human Nutrition: Current Issues (3)

An introduction of the principles of human nutrition with an emphasis on topics of current interest. The material is presented in a Canadian context to focus on nutrition practices and problems in this country. Students will gain an understanding of factors affecting food selection and the role of nutrition in maintaining good health. Students will develop the ability to discriminate between reliable and unreliable information on the subject of food and nutrition. Students with credit for KIN 110 may not take BPK 110 for further credit. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
C200 Distance Education
D100 Diana Bedoya
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
DFA 300, Burnaby
D101
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D102
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
D103
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5035, Burnaby
D104
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
D105
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D106
We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
D107
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
D108
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D109
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 4125, Burnaby
D110
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D111
Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D112
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
D113
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
D114
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
D115
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 7101, Burnaby
D300 Amandio Vieira
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 2740, Surrey
D301
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 2995, Surrey
D302
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SUR 2995, Surrey
D303
Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 2995, Surrey
E100 Andrew Blaber
We 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
HCC 2945, Vancouver
E101
We 8:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 3122, Vancouver
E102
We 7:30 PM – 8:20 PM
HCC 3122, Vancouver
BPK 140 - Contemporary Health Issues (3)

Explores health from a holistic perspective, in which health is viewed as physical, psychological, and social well-being. Considers genetics, environment, personal health behaviors (such as diet, exercise, stress management, and drug use), socioeconomic status, health care delivery systems, and aging with the intent to improve students' abilities to evaluate health information. Students with credit for KIN 140 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
C200 Distance Education
D100 Andrew Blaber
Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
D101
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D102
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
D103
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
D104
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5014, Burnaby
D105
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 4125, Burnaby
D106
Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D107
Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D108
Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D109
Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D110
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D200 Mike Walsh
Mo 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SUR 2750, Surrey
D201
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 2970, Surrey
D202
Mo 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
SUR 2970, Surrey
D203
Mo 7:30 PM – 8:20 PM
SUR 2970, Surrey
BPK 180W - Introduction to Ergonomics (3)

Intended for students with a potential interest in ergonomics or human factors. The course surveys the design of work, the workplace environment, information systems, and consumer products. Topics include musculoskeletal disorders, manual materials handling, workplace design, organization of work, design of human/machine interfaces, environmental ergonomics, industrial design, and legal and social issues. Prerequisite: Grade 12 Biology or Physics, Grade 12 Math. Students with credit for BPK (or KIN) 180 and KIN 180W may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

BPK 241 - Sports Injuries - Prevention and Rehabilitation (3)

Includes delineation of the role of the sports therapist and will study the structural and functional characteristics of the body with regard to the prevention of injury in sport. A first aid approach to athletic injuries will be developed with practical experience in routine treatments. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 142. Students with credit for KIN 241 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sessional
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 8100, Burnaby
D101
We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCK 8605, Burnaby
D102
We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCK 8605, Burnaby
D103
We 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SSCK 8605, Burnaby
D104
We 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCK 8605, Burnaby

Lower Division Active Health and Rehabilitation Concentration

Students who choose this concentration will complete all of

BPK 110 - Human Nutrition: Current Issues (3)

An introduction of the principles of human nutrition with an emphasis on topics of current interest. The material is presented in a Canadian context to focus on nutrition practices and problems in this country. Students will gain an understanding of factors affecting food selection and the role of nutrition in maintaining good health. Students will develop the ability to discriminate between reliable and unreliable information on the subject of food and nutrition. Students with credit for KIN 110 may not take BPK 110 for further credit. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
C200 Distance Education
D100 Diana Bedoya
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
DFA 300, Burnaby
D101
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D102
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
D103
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5035, Burnaby
D104
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
D105
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D106
We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
D107
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
D108
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D109
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 4125, Burnaby
D110
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D111
Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D112
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
D113
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
D114
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
D115
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 7101, Burnaby
D300 Amandio Vieira
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 2740, Surrey
D301
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 2995, Surrey
D302
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SUR 2995, Surrey
D303
Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 2995, Surrey
E100 Andrew Blaber
We 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
HCC 2945, Vancouver
E101
We 8:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 3122, Vancouver
E102
We 7:30 PM – 8:20 PM
HCC 3122, Vancouver
BPK 140 - Contemporary Health Issues (3)

Explores health from a holistic perspective, in which health is viewed as physical, psychological, and social well-being. Considers genetics, environment, personal health behaviors (such as diet, exercise, stress management, and drug use), socioeconomic status, health care delivery systems, and aging with the intent to improve students' abilities to evaluate health information. Students with credit for KIN 140 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
C200 Distance Education
D100 Andrew Blaber
Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
D101
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D102
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
D103
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
D104
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5014, Burnaby
D105
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 4125, Burnaby
D106
Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D107
Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D108
Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D109
Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D110
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D200 Mike Walsh
Mo 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SUR 2750, Surrey
D201
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 2970, Surrey
D202
Mo 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
SUR 2970, Surrey
D203
Mo 7:30 PM – 8:20 PM
SUR 2970, Surrey
BPK 241 - Sports Injuries - Prevention and Rehabilitation (3)

Includes delineation of the role of the sports therapist and will study the structural and functional characteristics of the body with regard to the prevention of injury in sport. A first aid approach to athletic injuries will be developed with practical experience in routine treatments. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 142. Students with credit for KIN 241 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sessional
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 8100, Burnaby
D101
We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCK 8605, Burnaby
D102
We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCK 8605, Burnaby
D103
We 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SSCK 8605, Burnaby
D104
We 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCK 8605, Burnaby

Breadth and Writing Requirements

For students admitted prior to September 2006, a minimum of six units must be selected from the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences.

For students admitted September 2006 or later, a minimum of six units of designated humanities breadth (B-Hum) courses, and a minimum of six units of designated social sciences breadth (B-Soc) courses must be completed.

At least three units of lower division course work should also be identified as writing-intensive (W) courses. The quantitative (Q), science breadth (B-Sci) and undesignated breadth (UB) requirements are satisfied through completion of the Kinesiology lower division core course set and hence do not require additional work. For more information, see www.sfu.ca/ugcr.

Upper Division Requirements

All of the following courses must be completed with a grade of C- or higher.

Upper Division Core

All students complete all of the following courses

BPK 304W - Inquiry and Measurement in Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology (3) +

This course covers the evaluation of measurement quality, test construction and assessment, and computer techniques for data capture and signal processing relevant to issues in Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology. Prereq statistical knowledge will be put into practice when discussing typical research designs, modeling and hypothesis testing in Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 142, 201, 205, and STAT 201. Students with credit for BPK (or KIN) 304 may not repeat this course for further credit. Writing/Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Richard Ward
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 8100, Burnaby
ASB 10900, Burnaby
D101 Richard Ward
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 3148.1, Burnaby
D102 Richard Ward
Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 3148.1, Burnaby
D103 Richard Ward
Th 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 3148.1, Burnaby
D104 Richard Ward
Th 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
AQ 3148.1, Burnaby
BPK 305 - Human Physiology I (3)

A detailed examination of the physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiac, vascular and respiratory systems. The course focuses on integration of physiological mechanisms at the molecular, cellular and systems levels. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 205, MBB 231 (or 201), MATH 155 (or 152). Majors from outside BPK require BPK (or KIN) 205 (or BISC 305), MBB 231 (or 201), MATH 155 (or 152) plus permission of the instructor. Students with credit for KIN 305 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Thomas Claydon
Mo, We, Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
WMC 3260, Burnaby
D101
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D102
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D103
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 4125, Burnaby
D104
Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D105
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
BPK 306 - Human Physiology II (3)

A detailed examination of the physiology and pathophysiology of the nervous system, skeletal muscle and connective tissue. The course focuses on integration of physiological mechanisms at the molecular, cellular and systems levels. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 207, Co-requisite BPK 305. Majors from outside BPK require BPK (or KIN) 205 (or BISC 305), MBB 231 (or 201), MATH 155 (or 152) plus permission of the instructor. Students with credit for KIN 306 may not take this course for further credit.

BPK 310 - Exercise/Work Physiology (3)

The study of human physiological responses and adaptations to acute and chronic exercise/work. Cardiorespiratory, cellular and metabolic adaptations will be studied and discussed in detail. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 205, MBB 201 (or 231). Recommended: BPK (or KIN) 201. Students with credit for KIN 310 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ryan Peter Dill
Mo 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
HCC 1530, Vancouver
BPK 326 - Functional Anatomy (4)

Pursues a systematic study of human anatomy with emphasis on functional applications. A comparative study of organs and body systems using laboratory dissections to provide an understanding of the three dimensional organization of the human body. Participation in all labs is required. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 142, 201, 205 and at least 60 units. Behavioral Neuroscience Major and Honours students req BPK (or KIN) 142, 205, PSYC 280 and at least 60 units. Students with credit for BPK (or KIN) 324 or BPK (or KIN) 325 or KIN 326 may not repeat this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Leanne Ramer
Mo, We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SECB 1012, Burnaby
D101
Mo, We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCK 9618, Burnaby
D102
Mo, We 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SSCK 9618, Burnaby
BPK 340 - Active Health: Behavior and Promotion (3)

Relationships among health, physical activity, and other health-associated behaviors are examined. In addition, the theories and models of health behavior, in the context of intervention and promotion strategies, are discussed. Pertinent background information is provided, concerning the influence of fitness on various disease states, as well as the epidemiology of health and exercise behaviors. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 142, STAT 201 (or PSYC 201). Recommended: BPK (or KIN) 140. Students with credit for KIN 340 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Steve Brown
Th 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
BLU 10021, Burnaby

and one of*

BPK 301 - Biomechanics Laboratory (3)

A laboratory course on the quantitative biomechanical evaluation of human movement. Students will learn analysis techniques for quantifying kinematics and kinetics of body segments in athletes, normal populations, and special populations during activities such as walking and jumping. Experiments will look at the nature of muscular force generation, and the mechanical impedance properties of the musculoskeletal system, as well as patterns of muscle activation, using surface EMG. Prerequisite: PHYS 102 (or 121 or 126 or 141), BPK (or KIN) 201. Students with credit for KIN 301 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 James Wakeling
Tu 8:30 AM – 12:20 PM
TASC2 7440, Burnaby
BPK 407 - Human Physiology Laboratory (3)

Experiments dealing with the nervous, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems are covered. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 305 and 306, one of which must already have been completed and the other can be taken concurrently. Students with credit for KIN 407 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jim Carter
Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCK 8605, Burnaby
D200 Jim Carter
Fr 8:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCK 8605, Burnaby
D300 Jim Carter
Fr 12:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCK 8605, Burnaby

* Students can complete both BPK 301 and 407, and count one as an elective.

+ BPK 304W satisfies the University’s breadth requirements of three upper division units in writing

General Program or Concentration Upper Division  Requirements

Students complete either the general program requirements as listed immediately below, or they can choose to complete the requirements for the Active Health and Rehabilitation Concentration (see below).

General Program

This program option requires a total of at least 45 upper division units, which is composed of the upper division core courses as shown above and the following additional requirements.

Students who choose this option will complete an additional 21 biomedical physiology and kinesiology units chosen from upper division BPK courses, excluding BPK (or KIN) 325, 342, 457, 459, 491, 495 and 499. MBB 321 may be used to satisfy three units of this requirement.

As well, an additional three upper division units, chosen from any department within the University including BPK, but excluding BPK 325, 342, 457, 459, 491,495 and 499.

Students admitted in September 2006 or later are also required to complete the University's writing, quantitative and breadth (WQB) requirements, which includes the requirement of completing three units of writing-intensive credit at the upper division. The W component may be included within the 45 upper division unit total for this general program.

Active Health and Rehabilitation Concentration

This program option requires a total of at least 45 upper division units, which is composed of the upper division core courses shown above and the following additional requirements. Students who choose this concentration will complete additional BPK units as specified below, including all of

BPK 303 - Kinanthropometry (3)

A study of human size, shape, proportion, composition, maturation and gross function related to basic concepts of growth, exercise, performance and nutrition. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 105 or 142, and STAT 201 or an equivalent statistics course. Students with credit for KIN 303 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Richard Ward
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
ASB 10900, Burnaby
D101 Richard Ward
We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCK 8650, Burnaby
D102 Richard Ward
We 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SSCK 8650, Burnaby
D103 Richard Ward
We 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCK 8650, Burnaby
BPK 343 - Active Health: Assessment and Programming (3)

An extension of BPK (or KIN) 143, Exercise Management, designed to provide students with an opportunity to appreciate principles of exercise leadership, assess individual fitness needs, design programs and monitor effects of prescribed exercise. The course includes a 34 hour practicum. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 142, 143 and 205; STAT 201 or an equivalent statistics course, BPK (or KIN) 340 (may be taken concurrently). Students must successfully complete a Criminal Record Check prior to enrolling. Students with credit for BPK (or KIN) 342 or KIN 343 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ryan Peter Dill
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2220, Burnaby
D101
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCK 8605, Burnaby
D102
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SSCK 8605, Burnaby

and four of

BPK 307 - Human Physiology III (3)

A detailed examination of the physiology and pathophysiology of the gastrointestinal, renal, endocrine, immune and reproductive systems. The course focuses on integration of physiological mechanisms at the molecular, cellular and systems levels. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 305, Co-requisite BPK (or KIN) 306. Majors from outside BPK require BPK (or KIN) 205 (or BISC 305), MBB 231 (or 201), MATH 155 or 152 plus permission of the instructor.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Victoria Claydon
William Cupples
Mo, We, Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SECB 1011, Burnaby
D101
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
D102
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D103
Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
BPK 308 - Experiments and Models in Systems Physiology (3)

Lab exercises will provide a hands-on experience in the acquisition of physiological data and mathematical and computer modeling of physiological systems. Lectures will provide an advanced understanding of select human physiological systems. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 208 or all of BPK (or KIN) 205, 201, STAT 201 and a strong mathematical background. Students with credit for KIN 308 may not take this course for further credit.

BPK 311 - Applied Human Nutrition (3)

The principles of nutritional biochemistry are applied to nutrition in life cycle - pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence and aging. The second part of the course deals with common disease conditions where nutrition plays an important role in prevention or treatment or both. The course is presented in the Canadian context featuring sources of help on Canadian practice, standards and regulations. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 105 or 205 (formerly KIN 100), and 110. Students with credit for BPK (or KIN) 220 or BPK (or KIN) 311 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Amandio Vieira
Fr 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SECB 1012, Burnaby
D101
Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 4125, Burnaby
D102
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 4125, Burnaby
BPK 312 - Nutrition for Fitness and Sport (3)

This course examines the theory and application of nutrition for fitness and sport. Students will study issues around dietary practices commonly promoted for performance enhancement, including mechanisms, effectiveness, risks and regulations. Students will learn skills for critical evaluation of nutrition research and nutrition claims, and will employ these in several small group projects investigating specific nutrition issues and products. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 105 (or 205), and 110. Students with credit for KIN 312 or BPK (or KIN) 424 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Matthew White
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 9000, Burnaby
D101
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D102
Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 7101, Burnaby
D103
Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7101, Burnaby
BPK 375 - Human Growth and Development (3)

The fundamentals of physiological growth and development from conception to maturity. Topics included form a strong foundation for those interested in designing appropriate activity programs for children of all ages. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 105 or 205, and 142. Students with credit for KIN 375 may not take this course for further credit.

BPK 381 - Psychology of Work (3)

The application of psychological principles and methods to the study of human performance at work. A systems approach will be taken to study the interactions among the individual worker, his/her task, groups of workers, and the management structure of the organization. Prerequisite: PSYC 210 or both of BPK (or KIN) 207 and STAT 201. Corequisite: STAT 201 may be taken concurrently. Recommended: KIN 180. Students with credit for KIN 381 may not take this course for further credit.

BPK 382 - Workplace Health (3)

The focus of this course will be the study of the physical environment and its effects on the health, safety and performance of the worker. Physical problems associated with noise, vibration, lighting, radiation, dust and ventilation will be examined together with methods of recognition, treatment, protection and prevention. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 142, 201, 205. Students with credit for KIN 382 may not repeat this course for further credit. Quantitative.

BPK 401 - Muscle Biomechanics (3)

The mechanics and function of skeletal muscle, from the level of single muscle fibres to the whole muscle-tendon unit. The role of muscle structure, recruitment patterns and contractile conditions to the force development, power output and efficiency of contractions will be considered. Theoretical, experimental and computational aspects will be covered. Prerequisite: 90 credits, BPK (or KIN) 201 and 205, or BPK (or KIN) 208. Students with credit for BPK (or KIN) 421, Muscle Biomechanics, may not take this course for further credit.

BPK 402 - Mechanical Behavior of Biological Tissues (3)

Extension of BPK 201 provides students with an understanding of structure-function relations in musculoskeletal tissues (bone, cartilage and muscle) in health and disease. Includes effect of disease and aging on physiological and biomechanical properties, mechanics and prevention of tissue injury, and design of implants and prostheses. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 201. Students with credit for KIN 402 may not take this course for further credit.

BPK 408W - Cellular Physiology Laboratory (3)

An advanced laboratory course in cellular physiological techniques providing students with theoretical and practical training in cellular physiology laboratory techniques such as DNA and RNA manipulation and quantification, immunofluorescence imaging of protein expression, tissue contraction studies and recording of nerve action potentials and modulation. Prerequisite: STAT 201 and BPK 305 for BPK Majors or BISC 305 for BISC Majors. Enrollment of non-BPK and non-BISC majors require permission of the instructor. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nadine Wicks
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5006, Burnaby
D101 Angela Wilson
Nadine Wicks
Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSB 8169, Burnaby
BPK 412 - Molecular Cardiac Physiology (3)

This course entails a detailed analysis of the molecular and cellular basis of cardiac function. The material will be derived from myriad disciplines including: structure (histology and ultrastructure, molecular), biophysics, biomechanics, physiology, electrophysiology, biochemistry and molecular biology. A particular emphasis will be placed on the mechanisms by which inherited arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies manifest as a pathological phenotype. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 305. Students with credit for KIN 412 may not repeat this course for further credit.

BPK 415 - Neural Control of Movement (3)

An in depth study of the neurophysiology of movement. Illustrates general principles of neural control by exploring specific movement tasks including standing, walking, reaching/grasping, and eye movements. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 306 or BISC 305. Students with credit for KIN 415 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Daniel Marigold
Tu, Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5016, Burnaby
BPK 417W - Obesity, Adipocyte Function and Weight Management (3)

Discusses mechanisms of health and disease with respect to a range of molecular mechanisms of physiology and organ system function, including how adipokines have an effect on metabolic alterations in immunology and hormone production in diabetes, stress and cardiovascular disease. Health behavior change in obesity and impact of dietary habits upon hyperlipidemia and apolipoprotein metabolism are addressed in addition to nutritional challenges in weight management and obesity. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 110, 306, 314 (or 311), 340. Students with credit for BPK (or KIN) 417 or KIN 417W may not repeat this course for further credit. Writing.

BPK 420 - Selected Topics in Kinesiology I (3) ^

Selected topics in areas not currently offered as formal courses within the undergraduate course offerings in the School of Kinesiology. The topics in this course will vary from term to term, depending on faculty availability and student interest. Prerequisite: To be announced in the Undergraduate Schedule of Classes and Examinations.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Damon Poburko
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 10061, Burnaby
D101 Damon Poburko
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
BLU 10031, Burnaby
D102 Damon Poburko
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
BPK 421 - Selected Topics in Kinesiology II (3) ^

Selected topics in areas not currently offered as formal courses within the undergraduate course offerings in the School of Kinesiology. The topics in this course will vary from term to term, depending on faculty availability and student interest. Prerequisite: to be announced.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Peter Ruben
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5018, Burnaby
BPK 422 - Selected Topics in Kinesiology III (3) ^

Selected topics in areas not currently offered as formal courses within the undergraduate course offerings in the School of Kinesiology. The topics in this course will vary from term to term, depending on faculty availability and student interest. Prerequisite: To be announced.

BPK 423 - Selected Topics in Kinesiology IV (3) ^

Selected topics in areas not currently offered as formal courses within the undergraduate course offerings in the School of Kinesiology. The topics in this course will vary from term to term, depending on faculty availability and student interest. Prerequisite: To be announced in the Undergraduate Schedule of Classes and Examinations.

BPK 426 - Neuromuscular Anatomy (3)

This course explores human neuromuscular anatomy using a lecture format supplemented by course readings, an anatomy atlas and tutorials which are presented in an interactive fashion via the Macintosh Computer Laboratory on campus. A strong grounding will be given in neuroanatomy with additional emphasis on the limb musculature and its innervation. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 324 or BPK (or KIN) 325 or BPK (or KIN) 326. Students with credit for KIN 426 may not complete this course for further credit.

BPK 431 - Integrative Cancer Biology (3)

Core concepts in cancer biology ranging from the clinical and pathological basis of carcinogenesis to the molecular and cellular changes involved in cancer development. Emphasis will be on the complex interactions of lifestyle factors, genetics and social cultural determinants on cancer risk. Prerequisite: MBB 231 (or MBB 201) and at least 90 units. Students with credit for KIN 431 may not complete this course for further credit.

BPK 432 - Physiological Basis of Temperature Regulation (3)

The study of human temperature regulation in extreme environments. Physiological responses in hot and cold environments will be studied at molecular, cellular and whole body/systems physiology levels. The course focuses on the mechanisms of control of human temperature as well as unresolved topics in this area of physiology. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 305 or BISC 305. Recommended BPK (or KIN) 407. Students with credit for BPK 420, Physiological Basis of Temperature Regulation, may not take this course for further credit.

BPK 443 - Advanced Exercise Prescription (3)

This course covers evidence-based practice and quantitative modeling skills for prescribing effective exercise programs to any individual who has a specific health, rehabilitation or performance goal. Programming considerations for various special populations (e.g., those with chronic disease, elite athletes) will be emphasized through laboratory-based case studies representing diverse professional settings such as active rehabilitation, strength & conditioning and clinical exercise physiology. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 304W, 310 and 343. Students with credit for BPK 344 or BPK 423-Advanced Exercise Prescription may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Dave Clarke
We 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5005, Burnaby
D101
We 6:30 PM – 8:20 PM
AQ 5004, Burnaby
D102
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
BPK 444 - Cardiac Disease: Pathophysiology and Assessment (3)

Examines the etiology, prevention, and rehabilitation of cardiovascular disease. Involves the assessment of patient risk factors, and non-invasive cardiovascular assessments. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the recording and interpretation of the electrocardiogram in health and disease. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 305. Recommended: BPK (or KIN) 110, 306, 310 and 343. Students taking KIN 444 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Victoria Claydon
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5037, Burnaby
D101
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCK 8650, Burnaby
D102
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCK 8650, Burnaby
BPK 445 - Advanced Cardiac Rehabilitation (3)

Builds upon the knowledge and skills learned in BPK (or KIN) 444 through advanced ECG interpretation, exercise stress testing, and patient counseling. Students will be required to complete a 30 hour practicum within a community or hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation program. In addition, this course will introduce students to relevant research questions in cardiac rehabilitation and how this field is expanding and evolving. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 444. Students must successfully complete a Criminal Record Check. Students with credit for KIN 445 may not take this course for further credit.

BPK 446 - Neurological Disorders (3)

Examines neural and neuromuscular diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, stroke, and myasthenia gravis. Emphasizes currently favoured hypotheses, underlying evidence and pathogenic mechanisms. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 306. Recommended: BPK (or KIN) 336 and/or BPK (or KIN) 415. Students with credit for KIN 446 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Charles Krieger
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5016, Burnaby
RCB 8100, Burnaby
BPK 448 - Rehabilitation of Movement Control (3)

This course is aimed at students interested in neuromuscular rehabilitation. Students will learn about the pathological origins of movement disorders associated with impaired function of sensory and motor systems. The course will be focused on the stages and strategies for recovery of voluntary control of essential functions. The range of rehabilitation interventions available to assist recovery and restore voluntary control will be explored, with special emphasis on advanced techniques to restore control of movement and bodily functions in paralyzed people. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 201 or 207, and BPK 306, or for biomedical engineering students, BPK (or KIN) 201, 208 and 308. Students with credit for KIN 448 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Andy Hoffer
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
Th 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 3210, Burnaby
AQ 3003, Burnaby
BPK 458 - Prevention and Management of Cardiovascular Disease (3)

A multi-disciplinary approach to understanding the pathology, risk factors and treatments for the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease. Physical examination, as well as non-invasive cardiac imaging techniques will be discussed and demonstrated. Both theoretical and practical perspectives inform the course's approach to the principles of behavioural change (diet, physical exercise, and smoking cessation) and risk factor management. Prerequisite: BPK(or KIN) 305 or HSCI 321. Students with credit for HSCI 471 or BPK 421 (Fall 2013) may not complete this course for further credit. Credit will not be given for both BPK 458 and HSCI 458.

BPK 461 - Physiological Aspects of Aging (3)

Designed for those who require a serious but fairly broad discussion of specific physiological aspects of aging. The overall emphasis is on humans and other mammalian species and the varieties of aging changes they manifest. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 105 or 205 (formerly KIN 100), 142 and 90 units. Students with credit for KIN 461 may not repeat this course for credit.

BPK 481 - Musculoskeletal Disorders (3)

Considers the prevalence, distribution, risk factors, mechanisms, management and prevention of disorders of muscle, connective tissue, joint, and bone. Covers tendonitis, bursitis, carpal tunnel syndrome and other overuse injuries from work and sport; whiplash-associated disorders; arthritis; osteoporosis; chronic pain; fibromyalgia. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 201 and 326. Students with credit for KIN 481 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Steve Brown
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
Fr 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
BLU 10021, Burnaby
BLU 10021, Burnaby
D101
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D102
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
BPK 482 - Ergonomics and Rehabilitation (3)

Examines the role of ergonomics within the rehabilitation process. Provides knowledge about tools and techniques for improving the rehabilitation process for patients, heath care providers and organizations. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN)180W, 201, 326, and 381. Corequisite: BPK (or KIN) 481. Students must successfully complete a Criminal Record Check before enrolling.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Anne-Kristina Arnold
Mo 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCK 8640, Burnaby

A maximum of six credits from the following may be used towards the above requirements

BPK 496 - Directed Study Literature (3) ^

Directed reading and literature research on topics selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. A short proposal of the project, approved by the course supervisor, must be submitted for approval to the chair of the undergraduate program committee by the end of the first week of classes of the term. May be repeated once for credit with a different course supervisor. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 304W (may be taken concurrently) or PSYC 210, and permission from the chair of the undergraduate program committee. Usually, upper level standing with at least 75 units in the Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology program will be required.

BPK 498 - Directed Study Experiential (3) ^

Directed study and research selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. A short proposal of the project approved by the course supervisor, must be submitted for approval to the chair of the undergraduate program committee by the end of the first week of classes of the term. May be repeated once for credit with a different course supervisor. Prerequisite: BPK (or KIN) 304W (may be taken concurrently) or PSYC 210, and permission from the chair of the undergraduate program committee. Usually, upper level standing with at least 75 units in the Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology program will be required.

^can be counted toward area of concentration if relevant to active health or rehabilitation kinesiology. Please see the head of the area of concentration for permission to count any of these courses toward the area of concentration requirement. 

and one additional upper division biomedical physiology and kinesiology course, excluding BPK (or KIN) 325, 342, 457, 459, 491, 495 and 499

and an additional three units of upper division units chosen from any department within the University including BPK, but excluding BPK 325, 342, 457, 459, 491, 495 and 499.

Unspecified and Partially Specified Electives

General Program

A total of 24 elective units are also required. These 24 units must include units from courses that will satisfy the University breadth requirement of six units each of designated humanities breadth (B-Hum) and social science breadth (B-Soc), and three units of lower division writing (W). For more information, please visit http://www.sfu.ca/ugcr.

Active Health and Rehabilitation Concentration

A total of 18 elective units are also required. These 18 units must include units from courses that will satisfy the University breadth requirement of six units each of designated humanities breadth (B-Hum) and social science breadth (B-Soc), and three units of lower division writing (W) as well as six units of designated CCUPEKA courses. For more information, please visit http://www.sfu.ca/ugcr.

The following courses can be used to satisfy the CCUPEKA requirements. They are also either B-Hum, B-Soc or both and will count toward the Simon Fraser University breadth requirements. Although courses can satisfy more than one requirement, they only count once towards the total number of units required for the degree. For example: EDUC 100W-3 satisfies B-Hum, W and CCUPEKA but will only count as 3 units, not 9 units, towards the total of 120 units required for the degree.

Social Science and Humanities Course List

ARCH 201 - Reconstructing the Human Past (4)

A survey of methods used by archaeologists to discover and interpret the past. Examples will be drawn from selected sites and cultures around the world. S. Students who have taken ARCH 101 may not enrol in ARCH 201. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 David Maxwell
Mo, We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SECB 1010, Burnaby
CMNS 110 - Introduction to Communication Studies (3)

An introduction to selected theories about human communication. This course is required for a major, honours or minor in communication. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
C200 Distance Education
D100 Gary McCarron
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
DFA 300, Burnaby
D101
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SSCK 8660, Burnaby
D102
Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCK 8660, Burnaby
D103
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCK 8660, Burnaby
D104
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SSCK 8660, Burnaby
D105
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCK 8660, Burnaby
D106
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SSCK 8660, Burnaby
D107
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
TASC2 7460, Burnaby
D108
Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
TASC2 7460, Burnaby
D109
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
TASC2 7460, Burnaby
D110
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
TASC2 7460, Burnaby
D111
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
TASC2 7460, Burnaby
D112
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
TASC2 7460, Burnaby
J100 John Hughes
We 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
HCC 2205, Vancouver
COGS 100 - Exploring the Mind (3)

This course provides a basic integrative overview of how cognitive science aspires to integrate the empirical findings, theories, and methods of psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, computing science and philosophy. Prerequisite: Open to all students. Students with credit for COGS 200 may not take COGS 100 for further credit. Breadth-Hum/Social Sci/Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Endre Begby
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 3003, Burnaby
AQ 3003, Burnaby
D900 Jeremy Turner
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
Fr 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SUR 3170, Surrey
SUR 3170, Surrey
CRIM 101 - Introduction to Criminology (3)

Topics will include: examination of different terms and concepts commonly used in criminology, such as crime, delinquency, deviance, criminal, victim, rehabilitation and treatment. Criminology as a body of knowledge and as a profession. Position and subject matter of criminology. Relationship between criminology and other academic disciplines. Specificity of criminology. Relationship between theory and practice. History and evolution of criminological thought. Elements of continuity and discontinuity between classical and modern theories of criminality. Levels of explanations in criminology. Practical applications of criminology. The foundations of a modern criminal policy. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Barry Cartwright
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
D101
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D102
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D103
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D104
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D105
Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D106
Th 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D107
Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D108
Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D109
Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D110
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D111
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D112
Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D113
Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D114
Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D115
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D116
Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D117
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D118
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D119
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D120
Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D900 Carols Ponce
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 2600, Surrey
D901
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SUR 2710, Surrey
D902
Tu 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SUR 2710, Surrey
D903
Tu 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
SUR 2710, Surrey
D904
We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SUR 2990, Surrey
D905
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SUR 2990, Surrey
D906
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SUR 2990, Surrey
D907
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 2990, Surrey
D908
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SUR 2990, Surrey
D909
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 2990, Surrey
CRIM 355 - The Forensic Sciences (3)

Examines the use and interpretation of physical forensic evidence in court. It will critically examine and evaluate the major forensic sciences used in criminal investigations today, as well as look at the crime scene. Subjects examined will include forensic pathology, odontology, biology, DNA evidence, firearms evidence, toxicology chemistry and questioned documents. Techniques will be illustrated with case studies. Prerequisite: 45 units. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Gail Anderson
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
EDB 7618, Burnaby
D101
Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
D102
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
D103
Tu 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
D104
We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
D105
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
D106
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
D107
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
D108
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
D109
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
D110
We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
D111
We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
DIAL 390W - Semester: Dialogue (5)

The Dialogue component of the Semester in Dialogue will immerse students in the art and practice of thinking and communicating. The focus will be on strategies and methods to use in understanding diverse perspectives. Students will have an opportunity to expand their verbal and written communication skills as well as explore dialogue as a developing academic field. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students should apply prior to the term in which they wish to enrol. Students can be accepted into either the Summer Institute in Dialogue (DIAL 390W and 391W, 10 units) or the Semester in Dialogue (fall or spring term, DIAL 390W, 391W and 392W, 15 units), but not both. Writing/Breadth-Hum/Soc Sci.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Diane Finegood
Mo, Tu, We, Th, Fr 9:30 AM – 4:50 PM
HCC 3050, Vancouver
DIAL 391W - Semester: Seminar (5)

Topics covered each term will vary, but generally each course will examine a subject that encourages broad approaches and probes provocative issues. The course will consist of discussions led by faculty, frequent visits from relevant off-campus experts, a heavy reading load, and a number of individual and group student projects. Learning will be active rather than passive, stimulating students to research, explore and discuss rather than following a lecture format. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students should apply prior to the term in which they wish to enrol. Students can be accepted into either the Summer Institute in Dialogue (DIAL 390W and 391W, 10 units) or the Semester in Dialogue (fall or spring semester, DIAL 390W, 391W and 392W, 15 units) but not both. Writing/Breadth-Hum/Soc Sci.

DIAL 392W - Semester: Final Project (5)

For their final project, each student will produce a manuscript suitable for submission to a major public media outlet on a topic relevant to the course focus for that term. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students should apply prior to the term in which they wish to enrol. Students can be accepted into either the Summer Institute in Dialogue (DIAL 390W and 391W, 10 units) or the Semester in Dialogue (fall or spring semester, DIAL 390W, 391W and 392W, 15 units), but not both. Writing/Breadth-Hum/Soc Sci.

EDUC 100W - Selected Questions and Issues in Education (3)

An introduction to a small but representative sample of basic questions and issues in education. Students will examine questions relating to: the concept or idea of education; learning and the learner; teaching and the teacher; and more generally, the broader contexts of education. This course also introduces students to different ways of exploring educational questions and issues from philosophical and critical analysis, to historical and cross-cultural studies, to empirical research. Cannot be taken for credit by students with credit for 300 and 400 level education courses. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
C200 Distance Education
D200 Michele Schmidt
Th 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SECB 1012, Burnaby
D300 Paula MacDowell
Mo 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 3050, Surrey
ENGL 111W - Literary Classics in English (3)

Examines literary “classics”, variously defined, apprehending them both on their own terms and within larger critical conversations. May incorporate the comparative study of work in related artistic fields and engage relevant media trends. Includes attention to writing skills. Students with credit for ENGL 101W may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 David Coley
Mo, We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
D101
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D102
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5026, Burnaby
D103
Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D104
Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5026, Burnaby
D105
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 3513, Burnaby
D106
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 3511, Burnaby
D107
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D108
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D109
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 6125, Burnaby
D110
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 5100, Burnaby
ENGL 112W - Literature Now (3)

Introduces students to contemporary works of literature in English and/or contemporary approaches to interpreting literature. May focus on one or multiple genres. Includes attention to writing skills. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Stephen Collis
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SWH 10081, Burnaby
SSCC 9002, Burnaby
D101
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D102
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D103
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
D104
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 4115, Burnaby
D105
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
D106
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2523, Burnaby
D107
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D109
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D110
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
ENGL 113W - Literature and Performance (3)

Introduces students to plays and performance works created and adapted for the stage, and/or the performative dimensions of other literary forms. May be organized historically, generically or thematically. The course may also explore the links between literary and performance theory. Includes attention to writing skills. Students with credit for ENGL 103W may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nicky Didicher
Mo, We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SSCC 9002, Burnaby
D101
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
TASC2 7201, Burnaby
D102
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 3251, Burnaby
D104
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 3251, Burnaby
D105
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
BLU 10901, Burnaby
D106
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 4115, Burnaby
D107
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5035, Burnaby
D109
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
ENGL 114W - Language and Purpose (3)

Introduces students to the relationships between writing and purpose, between the features of texts and their meaning and effects. May focus on one or more literary or non-literary genres, including (but not limited to) essays, oratory, autobiography, poetry, and journalism. Includes attention to writing skills. Students with credit for ENGL 104W may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Matthew Hussey
Tu, Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
D101
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
TASC2 7201, Burnaby
D102
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D103
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
D104
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
D105
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D106
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D107
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
BLU 11911, Burnaby
D109
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5046, Burnaby
D900 Orion Kidder
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 3240, Surrey
D901
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SUR 2995, Surrey
D902
Tu 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
SUR 2995, Surrey
ENGL 115W - Literature and Culture (3)

An Introduction to the study of literature within the wider cultural field, with a focus on contemporary issues across genres and media. Students with credit for ENGL 105W may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Susan Brook
Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 3520, Burnaby
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
D101
Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D102
Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D103
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 2533, Burnaby
D104
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 2531, Burnaby
D105
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 2523, Burnaby
D106
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 2521, Burnaby
D107
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5020, Burnaby
D108
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5014, Burnaby
D109
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D110
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D900 Clint Burnham
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 3090, Surrey
D901
Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SUR 3010, Surrey
D902
Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SUR 3260, Surrey
D903
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 3010, Surrey
D904
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 3260, Surrey
D905
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SUR 3010, Surrey
GERO 300 - Introduction to Gerontology (3)

Examination of the aging process from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Physical and health factors in aging, economic and vocational factors in aging, family and community relations of older people, social policy and politics of aging. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on normal aging. Prerequisite: 60 units. Students who have taken GERO 101 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Sarah Canham
Mo 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
HSCI 120 - Introduction to Human Sexuality and Sexual Behavior (3)

Introductory information about human sexuality across a broad spectrum of topic areas. Sexual function is a fundamental part of a full and healthy life, but misinformation, concerns, problems, and dysfunctions are prevalent. An evidence-based introduction to human sexual function and dysfunction, and normal psychosexual development across a range of sexual behaviors. A perspective on the effects of socialization on sexual attitudes and behavior. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Lauren Currie
Mo 4:30 PM – 7:20 PM
AQ 3182, Burnaby
HSCI 140 - Complementary and Alternative Medicine (3)

A scientific, critical, and evidence-based examination of integrative, complementary, and alternative approaches to health. Why so many people are skeptical of conventional medicine and contemporary treatment modalities. Incorporation of traditional medicines into mainstream medicine. the need to investigate, and to protect the public from fraud. The extent to which both complementary and mainstream medicine can withstand the scrutiny of an evidence-based approach. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mandana Salajegheh
We 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
BLU 9660, Burnaby
HSCI 160 - Global Perspectives on Health (3)

An introduction to the differences in health and health services among the nations of the globe. Vulnerable sub-populations worldwide and their special health needs. Mechanisms whereby events in one country can impact health in another. Future worldwide health risks, their economic and health consequences. SARS, avian 'flu,' West Nile virus, 'mad cow disease,' antibiotic resistant malaria or tuberculosis. Dangers to rich and poor nations from ignoring health problems in developing world. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Kate Tairyan
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
IAT 100 - Digital Image Design (3)

This is a project-based course that introduces the theory and hands-on practice of art and design in digital media. As the introductory course in IAT, this course teaches the core fundamental principles in 2D visual design, sequential and animation design. Students learn the fundamentals of digital photography and vector image creation. The theory is contextualized in contemporary new media design practice and is broadly applicable across disciplines. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kenneth Zupan
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SUR 2600, Surrey
D101 Kenneth Zupan
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 3130, Surrey
D102 Kenneth Zupan
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 3140, Surrey
D103 Kenneth Zupan
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 3130, Surrey
D104 Kenneth Zupan
We 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SUR 3130, Surrey
D105 Kenneth Zupan
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SUR 3130, Surrey
D106 Kenneth Zupan
We 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SUR 3140, Surrey
D107 Kenneth Zupan
We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 3130, Surrey
D108 Kenneth Zupan
We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 3140, Surrey
IAT 202 - New Media Images (3)

Explores the computational nature of technology as applied to contemporary art and design. It is a studio-based, media production course that explores new forms of art and design that are mediated by or modeled after computing processes as opposed to transforming or digitizing existing forms. Prerequisite: IAT 100 and a minimum of 15 units. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Susan Clements-Vivian
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 2600, Surrey
D101 Susan Clements-Vivian
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 3050, Surrey
D102 Susan Clements-Vivian
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 3100, Surrey
D103 Susan Clements-Vivian
Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 3050, Surrey
D104 Susan Clements-Vivian
Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 3100, Surrey
IAT 206W - Media Across Cultures (3)

Introduces a discursive framework for media, design and cultural interfaces enabling students to interpret, negotiate, and engage with new media with an awareness of the significance of cultural and contextual difference. Assessment is based on written and project work. Prerequisite: completion of 18 units. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Niranjan Rajah
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 2740, Surrey
D101 Niranjan Rajah
We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 2995, Surrey
D102 Niranjan Rajah
We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 3260, Surrey
D103 Niranjan Rajah
We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 2995, Surrey
D104 Niranjan Rajah
We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 3260, Surrey
PHIL 100W - Knowledge and Reality (3)

An introduction to some of the central problems of philosophy. Topics to be discussed include the different theories of reality; the nature and sources of knowledge, truth, evidence, and reason; the justification of belief and knowledge about the universe. These topics and problems will be considered as they arise in the context of issues such as: relativism versus absolutism; the existence of God; personal identity; the nature of the mind and its relation to the body; free will and determinism; the possibility of moral knowledge. Open to all students. Students with credit for PHIL 100 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jennifer Warriner
Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
DFA 300, Burnaby
D101
Mo 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D103
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 6100, Burnaby
D104
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 5100, Burnaby
D105
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5046, Burnaby
D106
Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 5100, Burnaby
D107
Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5046, Burnaby
D110
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 3531, Burnaby
D113
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D114
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D115
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 7105, Burnaby
D116
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D117
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D118
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
E200 Lyle Crawford
Tu 6:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 1600, Vancouver
PHIL 120W - Moral Problems (3)

A critical examination of a range of questions and problems we confront as moral agents, such as: the nature and scope of our moral responsibilities, the source of our moral and civil rights, and the role of moral emotions, like resentment, love and forgiveness. Students with credit for PHIL 120 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sam Black
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
D101
Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5026, Burnaby
D102
Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D103
Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D104
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 3515, Burnaby
D105
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D106
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D107
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D108
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D109
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D110
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7105, Burnaby
D111
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 6100, Burnaby
D112
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5026, Burnaby
D113
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D114
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D115
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5026, Burnaby
D116
Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 4125, Burnaby
D117
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
PHIL 144 - Introduction to Philosophy of Science (3)

An introduction to philosophical issues concerning the nature of science. Topics to be discussed include the distinction between science and pseudo-science, the nature of scientific method, the nature of explanation in the natural and social sciences, the phenomenon of scientific change, the relationship between scientific theory and observation, and the objectivity of social science. Students with credit for PHIL 244 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities/Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Simon Pollon
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 3005, Burnaby
SSCC 9000, Burnaby
D101
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
D102
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
D103
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
PHIL 150 - History of Philosophy I (3)

A survey of philosophic thought from late antiquity to the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the works of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Aquinas. The views of these great thinkers have helped to shape the ways in which we see the world. This course is therefore recommended to everyone with an interest in our intellectual heritage. Open to all students. Breadth-Humanities.

PHIL 151 - History of Philosophy II (3)

A survey of philosophic thought from the Renaissance to the 20th Century. Special attention will be given to the works of Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Hegel and Mill. The views of these great thinkers have helped to shape the ways in which we see the world. This course is therefore recommended to everyone with an interest in our intellectual heritage. Open to all students. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jennifer Warriner
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 6136, Burnaby
D900 Jason Leardi
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SUR 5100, Surrey
PHIL 300 - Introduction to Philosophy (3)

An introductory course specifically intended for students in other departments who have at least 60 units. This course is more advanced than 100 and 200 division courses and is of interest to students not only in the humanities, but also in the natural and social sciences. Normally, students with credit for PHIL 100 may not take this course for further credit. This course does not count towards the upper division requirements for a student pursuing a minor, major, or honors program in philosophy. Prerequisite: At least 60 units. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Jennifer Warriner
Mo 4:30 PM – 7:20 PM
HCC 2510, Vancouver
PSYC 100 - Introduction to Psychology I (3)

Acquaints the student with the major issues in contemporary psychology and considers the historical antecedents. Special attention is given to questions of methodology and research design in psychology. Topics in physiological psychology, perception, learning and motivation are considered. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 George Alder
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Th 9:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
D900 Sherrie Atwood
Mo 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SUR 2600, Surrey
PSYC 102 - Introduction to Psychology II (3)

Acquaints the student with major issues in contemporary psychology and considers their historical antecedents. Topics in learning, cognition, social psychology and abnormal psychology are considered. Recommended: PSYC 100 is recommended but not required. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Russell Day
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
Th 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
D900 Trishia Coburn
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SUR 2600, Surrey
PSYC 106 - Psychological Issues in Contemporary Society (3)

Relates contemporary knowledge from psychology to current social problems. Provides relevant information from studies pertaining to problems such as attitude development, prejudice, race relations, addiction, behavior technology, and family pathology. Course can be repeated for credit. See Psychology department website for course description. Students may not take this course for further credit if similar topics are covered. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
J100 Sherrie Atwood
Th 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
SUR 2750, Surrey
REM 100 - Global Change (3)

This course provides students with an overview of global environmental change and its causes from a social science perspective, historically and at the present time. Population growth, an increasing ecological footprint and changes in ideology, social organization, economy and technology will be critically reviewed. New ways of thinking in natural and social science will be considered in relation to specific issues such as land, soil and food; energy, raw materials and solid waste; air pollution and transportation; water, oceans and fisheries; climate change; forestry and biodiversity; urbanization, and alternative futures. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Pascal Haegeli
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 3520, Burnaby
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
D101
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D102
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
D103
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D104
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D105
Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
D106
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 2104, Burnaby
D107
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 11911, Burnaby
D108
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D109
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 7101, Burnaby
D110
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
SA 101 - Introduction to Anthropology (A) (4)

An introduction to the study of human social and cultural life from an anthropological perspective. The course will explore the scope and nature of the discipline of anthropology through study of selected cases drawn from both technologically simple communities and complex modern industrial societies. Students with credit for SA 170 may not take SA 101 for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences. Equivalent Courses: SA170. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Bascom Guffin
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
EDB 7618, Burnaby
D101
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
D102
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5035, Burnaby
D103
Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5020, Burnaby
D104
Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5014, Burnaby
D105
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2521, Burnaby
D106
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2501, Burnaby
D900 Bascom Guffin
Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SUR 5240, Surrey
D901
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 5060, Surrey
D902
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 5320, Surrey
D903
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 2990, Surrey
D904
Th 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SUR 2990, Surrey
SA 150 - Introduction to Sociology (S) (4)

The study of basic concerns of sociology, such as social order, social change, social conflict and social inequality. Breadth-Social Sciences. Equivalent Courses: PSA.101. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Kyle Willmott
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
D101
Mo 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D102
Mo 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D103
Mo 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D104
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 2120, Burnaby
D105
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5046, Burnaby
D106
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D107
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D108
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2501, Burnaby
D109
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D110
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
WMC 2523, Burnaby
D111
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
WMC 2501, Burnaby
D112
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D113
We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 3517, Burnaby
D114
We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 3515, Burnaby
D115
We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5026, Burnaby
D116
We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 3515, Burnaby
D117
We 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
D118
We 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
TASC2 7201, Burnaby
D900 Kyle Willmott
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SUR 3090, Surrey
D901
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 3010, Surrey
D902
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 3150, Surrey
D903
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 3010, Surrey
D904
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 3260, Surrey
D905
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SUR 3010, Surrey
D906
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SUR 3260, Surrey

The following courses qualify for CCUPEKA humanities or social science units, but not toward the Simon Fraser University breadth requirements.

CA 129 - Movement Fundamentals (3)

This studio/theory course incorporates techniques of body awareness, centering, and structural realignment. The emphasis is on body conditioning and body connectedness. This course will be of interest to dancers, actors, kinesiologists, and athletes. This is one of four courses required for entry into the dance major and extended minor program. Students with credit for FPA 129 may not take this course for further credit.

GERO 302 - Health Promotion and Aging (3)

This course includes an examination of the development of contemporary understanding and practice of health promotion. Students will be given the opportunity to explore theories and models designed to explain health related behaviors and the determinants of health. Strategies for behavioral change and development of socio-environmental approaches will be discussed in the context of an aging Canadian population. Prerequisite: 60 units. Recommended: GERO 300.

GERO 404 - Health and Illness in Later Life (3)

An examination of issues related to health and illness among older adults, drawing upon theories and concepts from biological, social and public health sciences. An introduction to assessment and intervention skills useful to persons working with older adults in a broad range of practice settings. Prerequisite: 60 units, GERO 300.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sharon Koehn
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
HCC 2205, Vancouver
GERO 420 - Sociology of Aging (4)

The structural and behavioral implications of aging. Topics include demographic aspects of aging; the relationship of aging to political, economic, familial and other social institutions; the psychological significance of aging. Prerequisite: 60 units. Recommended: GERO 300. Students with credit for SA 420 and students may not take this course for further credit.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
PHIL 105 - Critical Thinking (3)

An introduction to the evaluation of arguments as they are encountered in everyday life. The central aim will be to sharpen skills of reasoning and argumentation by understanding how arguments work and learning to distinguish those which actually prove what they set out to show from those which do not. Open to all students. Student with credit for PHIL XX1 may not take this course for further credit. Q/Breadth-Social Sci/Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jennifer Wang
Tu, Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
WMC 3520, Burnaby
D101
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 3517, Burnaby
D102
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D103
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
D104
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D105
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
D106
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
BLU 10901, Burnaby
D107
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
D108
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D109
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D110
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 7101, Burnaby
D111
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D112
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 7102, Burnaby
PHIL 110 - Introduction to Logic and Reasoning (3)

The aim of this course is to familiarize students with fundamental techniques of correct reasoning. Special attention is given to the methods of logic in particular, and to their role in the discovery of truth not only within science and philosophy but within all forms of rational enquiry. Open to all students. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nicolas Fillion
Mo, We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 10041, Burnaby
D101
Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
D102
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D103
Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D104
Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D105
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
BLU 11911, Burnaby
D106
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D107
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D108
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 7101, Burnaby
D900 Jonathan Katz
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 3250, Surrey
D901
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 3290, Surrey
D902
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SUR 3290, Surrey
PHIL 210 - Natural Deductive Logic (3)

This course studies a natural deductive system of propositional and quantificational logic, the first-order theory of identity and the first-order theory of relations. Topics include the metatheory of propositional logic and the application of formal theory to the assessment of natural language arguments. Quantitative.

SA 218 - Illness, Culture and Society (A) (4)

The study of socio-cultural factors related to health and illness. Focus will be on patterns of health seeking activity, systems of health care, causal and symbolic factors involved in physical and mental illness, and the medicalization of life in contemporary society. The disciplinary focus of the course will vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Students with credit SA 460 when offered as Medical Anthropology may not take SA 218 for further credit.

SA 318 - The Anthropology of Medicine (A) (4)

Explores the role of biomedicine in society and culture through inquiry into the social and ideological organization of health and healing. Special attention will be paid to how biomedical categories structure experiences of the body, how means of life and death are shaped through medical interventions, and how social relations organize the delivery of biomedical technologies. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Professional School Transfer

Students are eligible to receive a bachelor of science (BSc) degree after the completion of their second year of professional study if they have completed at least 90 units of Simon Fraser University credit normally comprising the following:

  • all lower division requirements
  • the upper division core requirements for their major
  • acceptance into an accredited professional program in dentistry, medicine, optometry, chiropractic, or veterinary medicine

Professional program courses must not duplicate those already completed at Simon Fraser University and must be acceptable for transfer credit to the University. Candidates apply for transfer credit and for receipt of the degree through Student Services.

University Degree Requirements

Students must also satisfy University degree requirements for degree completion.

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student’s major subject
Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth Must be outside the student’s major subject, and may be lower or upper division
6 units Social Sciences: B-Soc
6 units Humanities: B-Hum
6 units Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth 6 units outside the student’s major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements)

Students choosing to complete a joint major, joint honours, double major, two extended minors, an extended minor and a minor, or two minors may satisfy the breadth requirements (designated or not designated) with courses completed in either one or both program areas.

 

Residency Requirements and Transfer Credit

  • At least half of the program's total units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.
  • At least two thirds of the program's total upper division units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.

Elective Courses

In addition to the courses listed above, students should consult an academic advisor to plan the remaining required elective courses.