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To view the Fall 2017 Academic Calendar go to http://www.sfu.ca/students/calendar/2017/fall.html

Department of Philosophy Simon Fraser University Calendar | Spring 2018

Philosophy Double Minor

The following curriculum pertains to students who wish to complete a philosophy minor in conjunction with a second minor in another department, school or program.

With the undergraduate advisor, a student may design a minor program with an emphasis that complements a special interest. For example, programs may be designed for students with an interest in law, language, natural or social science, history of ideas, social theory, value theory or logic.

Program Requirements

Lower Division Requirements

Students complete six units, including one of

PHIL 100W - Knowledge and Reality (3)

An introduction to some of the central problems of philosophy. Topics to be discussed include the different theories of reality; the nature and sources of knowledge, truth, evidence, and reason; the justification of belief and knowledge about the universe. These topics and problems will be considered as they arise in the context of issues such as: relativism versus absolutism; the existence of God; personal identity; the nature of the mind and its relation to the body; free will and determinism; the possibility of moral knowledge. Open to all students. Students with credit for PHIL 100 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jennifer Warriner
Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
DFA 300, Burnaby
D101
Mo 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D103
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 6100, Burnaby
D104
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 5100, Burnaby
D105
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5046, Burnaby
D106
Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 5100, Burnaby
D107
Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5046, Burnaby
D110
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 3531, Burnaby
D113
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D114
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D115
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 7105, Burnaby
D116
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D117
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D118
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
E200 Lyle Crawford
Tu 6:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 1600, Vancouver
PHIL 120W - Moral Problems (3)

A critical examination of a range of questions and problems we confront as moral agents, such as: the nature and scope of our moral responsibilities, the source of our moral and civil rights, and the role of moral emotions, like resentment, love and forgiveness. Students with credit for PHIL 120 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sam Black
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
D101
Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5026, Burnaby
D102
Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D103
Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D104
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 3515, Burnaby
D105
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D106
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D107
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D108
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D109
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D110
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7105, Burnaby
D111
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 6100, Burnaby
D112
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5026, Burnaby
D113
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D114
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D115
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5026, Burnaby
D116
Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 4125, Burnaby
D117
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
PHIL 121 - Global Justice (3)

An introduction to the ethical issues arising from interactions of states, NGOs and other international agents. Topics may include international human rights, terrorism, war, gender justice, climate justice, fairness in international trade, cultural diversity and conflict, the rights of indigenous peoples, collective responsibility and restitution for historical wrongdoing, among others. Students who have received credit for PHIL 220 cannot receive credit for this course. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

PHIL 144 - Introduction to Philosophy of Science (3)

An introduction to philosophical issues concerning the nature of science. Topics to be discussed include the distinction between science and pseudo-science, the nature of scientific method, the nature of explanation in the natural and social sciences, the phenomenon of scientific change, the relationship between scientific theory and observation, and the objectivity of social science. Students with credit for PHIL 244 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities/Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Simon Pollon
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 3005, Burnaby
SSCC 9000, Burnaby
D101
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
D102
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
D103
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby

and one of

PHIL 201 - Epistemology (3)

A critical overview of recent accounts of the nature and scope of human knowledge and of justified or rational belief, and of philosophical issues that these accounts are intended to address. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 100W (or equivalent), 120W (or equivalent), 121, 144, 150, 151, or COGS 100. Students who have taken PHIL 301 cannot take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rosemary Twomey
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SECB 1010, Burnaby
SECB 1010, Burnaby
PHIL 203 - Metaphysics (3)

An examination of central problems of metaphysics such as space and time, universals and particulars, substance, identity and individuation and personal identity. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 100W (or equivalent), 120W (or equivalent), 121, 144, 150, 151, or COGS 100.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jennifer Wang
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5030, Burnaby
WMC 3510, Burnaby
PHIL 221 - Ethical Theory (3)

An examination of the major ethical theories, including deontology, consequentialism and virtue ethics. Applications of theses theories and related topics in value theory may also be discussed. Prerequisite: One of: PHIL 100W (or equivalent), PHIL 120W (or equivalent), PHIL 121, PHIL 144, PHIL 150 or PHIL 151.

Upper Division Requirements

Students complete at least 15 upper division units, including one of

PHIL 320 - Social and Political Philosophy (3)

An examination of an issue or selection of issues in social and political philosophy. Contemporary or historical readings or a mixture of these will be used. Possible topics include: justice, the law and legal systems, sovereignty, power and authority, democracy, liberty and equality. Sometimes the course will focus on the views of historically important political philosophers, such as Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Bentham, Mill and Marx. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 220, 221 or ENV 320W.

PHIL 321 - Topics in Moral Philosophy (3)

An advanced investigation of central issues and theories in moral philosophy. In any given term, the course may focus on a general theory or concept or concern, for example meta-ethics, utilitarianism, or theories of rights. Sometimes it will focus on a particular problem or problems, such as medical ethics, moral personhood, or free will and moral responsibility. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 220, 221 or ENV 320W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nicholas Smyth
Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
BLU 10021, Burnaby
PHIL 322 - History of Ethics (3)

An examination of an issue or selection of issues in the history of moral or political philosophy. Historical readings will be the primary focus and may include important figures such as Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Hume, and Kant. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 150, 151, 220 or 221.

and one of

PHIL 302 - Topics in Epistemology and Metaphysics (3)

An exploration of philosophical issues concerning, e.g.: causation, time, modality, or the self; the realism/nominalism or realism/idealism debate; relativism; the concept of truth; naturalized epistemology; global epistemological skepticism or perhaps a 'local' form of skepticism such as skepticism about induction or about sensory belief. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PHIL 201 or 203.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Philip Hanson
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
WMC 3250, Burnaby
WMC 3510, Burnaby
PHIL 341 - Philosophy of Science (3)

A study of the nature of scientific enquiry, classificatory systems, laws and theories, the role of observation in science, the demarcation between science and non-science, causality, the status of theoretical constructs, and teleological explanation. Prerequisite: Either one of: PHIL 201 or 203; or both of PHIL 100W (or equivalent) and COGS 200.

PHIL 343 - Philosophy of Mind (3)

A study of theories of the mind, consciousness, and human action. Prerequisite: Either one of: PHIL 201 or 203; or both of PHIL 100W (or equivalent) and COGS 200.

PHIL 344 - Philosophy of Language (3)

An introduction to the major philosophic theories of language. Topics to be considered include the relationship between language and mind, language and the world, language and society. Prerequisite: Either one of: PHIL 201 or 203; or both of PHIL 100W (or equivalent) and COGS 200.

and one of

PHIL 322 - History of Ethics (3)

An examination of an issue or selection of issues in the history of moral or political philosophy. Historical readings will be the primary focus and may include important figures such as Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Hume, and Kant. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 150, 151, 220 or 221.

PHIL 350 - Ancient Philosophy (3)

Examines central philosophical themes and figures in ancient philosophy. Topics may include justice, knowledge, the good life, time, change, appearance and reality, the nature of God, and others. Historical readings will be the central focus and may include works by Plato, Aristotle, Thales, Anaximander, Pythagoras, Parmenides and others. Prerequisite: PHIL 100W (or equivalent) or 150.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rosemary Twomey
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Th 9:30 AM – 11:20 AM
WMC 3250, Burnaby
SECB 1013, Burnaby
PHIL 352 - 17th Century Philosophy (3)

An examination of some central issues in 17th century philosophy. Themes may include: changing theories of causation, of the mind, and of the relation between mind and world. Historical readings will be the primary focus and may include important figures such as Descartes, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Malebranche, Spinoza, Leibniz, and Locke. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 100W (or equivalent) or 151. Students who have completed PHIL 353 or PHIL 354 prior to Fall 2006 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 David Heide
Mo 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 2200, Burnaby
PHIL 356 - 18th Century Philosophy (3)

An examination of some central issues of 18th century philosophy. Themes may include the development of the theory of ideas and epistemology associated with it. The primary focus may include important figures such as Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Condillac. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 100W (or equivalent) or 151. Students with credit for PHIL 355 prior to Fall 2006 may not take this course for further credit.

PHIL 357 - Topics in the History of Philosophy (3)

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 100W (or equivalent), 150, or 151.

PHIL 358 - 19th Century Philosophy (3)

An examination of some major figures in 19th century philosophy. Themes may include German idealism and romanticism, British idealism, positivism and American pragmatism; studied figures may include Schopenhauer, Fichte, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Comte, Kierkegaard, Brentano,Meinong, Mill, Pierce and James, depending on theme. Prerequisite: PHIL 100W (or equivalent) or 151.

† unless counted as a history stream requirement

Seminars and Special Topics Courses

A student may not enrol in a philosophy seminar or selected topics course which duplicates work for which the student has received credit in another philosophy seminar or special topics course.

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Degree Requirements

For all bachelor of arts (BA) programs, students complete 120 units, which includes

  • at least 60 units that must be completed at Simon Fraser University
  • at least 45 upper division units, of which at least 30 upper division units must be completed at Simon Fraser University
  • at least 65 units (including 21 upper division units) in Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences courses
  • satisfaction of the writing, quantitative, and breadth requirements
  • an overall cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and upper division CGPA of at least 2.0, and a program (major, joint major, extended minor, minor) CGPA and upper division CGPA of at least 2.0

For students in other Faculties, please check your Faculty's overall degree requirements: https://www.sfu.ca/students/calendar/faculties-research.html

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student’s major subject
Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth Must be outside the student’s major subject, and may be lower or upper division
6 units Social Sciences: B-Soc
6 units Humanities: B-Hum
6 units Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth 6 units outside the student’s major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements)

Students choosing to complete a joint major, joint honours, double major, two extended minors, an extended minor and a minor, or two minors may satisfy the breadth requirements (designated or not designated) with courses completed in either one or both program areas.