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Department of Philosophy Simon Fraser University Calendar | Spring 2018

Philosophy Honours

Bachelor of Arts

This program is for students who are capable of self-direction who wish to pursue advanced work in philosophy with the benefit of individual attention.

Admission Requirements

Submit an honours program application (available in the department office), and consult the advisor.

Entering students must first complete 60 units including 12 upper division philosophy units, and must fulfil lower division requirements as listed below.

Normally a 3.5 grade point average (GPA) or higher in upper division philosophy courses is expected for entrance and continuance but does not by itself guarantee either.

Program Requirements

Students complete 132 units, as specified below.

Lower Division Requirements

Students complete a total of at least 15 units, including one of

PHIL 150 - History of Philosophy I (3)

A survey of philosophic thought from late antiquity to the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the works of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Aquinas. The views of these great thinkers have helped to shape the ways in which we see the world. This course is therefore recommended to everyone with an interest in our intellectual heritage. Open to all students. Breadth-Humanities.

PHIL 151 - History of Philosophy II (3)

A survey of philosophic thought from the Renaissance to the 20th Century. Special attention will be given to the works of Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Hegel and Mill. The views of these great thinkers have helped to shape the ways in which we see the world. This course is therefore recommended to everyone with an interest in our intellectual heritage. Open to all students. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jennifer Warriner
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 6136, Burnaby
D900 Jason Leardi
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SUR 5100, Surrey

and one of

PHIL 110 - Introduction to Logic and Reasoning (3)

The aim of this course is to familiarize students with fundamental techniques of correct reasoning. Special attention is given to the methods of logic in particular, and to their role in the discovery of truth not only within science and philosophy but within all forms of rational enquiry. Open to all students. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nicolas Fillion
Mo, We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 10041, Burnaby
D101
Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
D102
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D103
Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D104
Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D105
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
BLU 11911, Burnaby
D106
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D107
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D108
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 7101, Burnaby
D900 Jonathan Katz
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 3250, Surrey
D901
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 3290, Surrey
D902
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SUR 3290, Surrey
D903
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 3290, Surrey
PHIL 210 - Natural Deductive Logic (3)

This course studies a natural deductive system of propositional and quantificational logic, the first-order theory of identity and the first-order theory of relations. Topics include the metatheory of propositional logic and the application of formal theory to the assessment of natural language arguments. Quantitative.

and all of

PHIL 201 - Epistemology (3)

A critical overview of recent accounts of the nature and scope of human knowledge and of justified or rational belief, and of philosophical issues that these accounts are intended to address. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 100W (or equivalent), 120W (or equivalent), 121, 144, 150, 151, or COGS 100. Students who have taken PHIL 301 cannot take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rosemary Twomey
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SECB 1010, Burnaby
SECB 1010, Burnaby
PHIL 203 - Metaphysics (3)

An examination of central problems of metaphysics such as space and time, universals and particulars, substance, identity and individuation and personal identity. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 100W (or equivalent), 120W (or equivalent), 121, 144, 150, 151, or COGS 100.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jennifer Wang
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5030, Burnaby
WMC 3510, Burnaby
PHIL 221 - Ethical Theory (3)

An examination of the major ethical theories, including deontology, consequentialism and virtue ethics. Applications of theses theories and related topics in value theory may also be discussed. Prerequisite: One of: PHIL 100W (or equivalent), PHIL 120W (or equivalent), PHIL 121, PHIL 144, PHIL 150 or PHIL 151.

Upper Division Requirements

Students complete at least 50 units, including one course at the 400 division, and at least one of

PHIL 320 - Social and Political Philosophy (3)

An examination of an issue or selection of issues in social and political philosophy. Contemporary or historical readings or a mixture of these will be used. Possible topics include: justice, the law and legal systems, sovereignty, power and authority, democracy, liberty and equality. Sometimes the course will focus on the views of historically important political philosophers, such as Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Bentham, Mill and Marx. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 220, 221 or ENV 320W.

PHIL 321 - Topics in Moral Philosophy (3)

An advanced investigation of central issues and theories in moral philosophy. In any given term, the course may focus on a general theory or concept or concern, for example meta-ethics, utilitarianism, or theories of rights. Sometimes it will focus on a particular problem or problems, such as medical ethics, moral personhood, or free will and moral responsibility. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 220, 221 or ENV 320W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nicholas Smyth
Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
BLU 10031, Burnaby
PHIL 322 - History of Ethics (3) *

An examination of an issue or selection of issues in the history of moral or political philosophy. Historical readings will be the primary focus and may include important figures such as Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Hume, and Kant. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 150, 151, 220 or 221.

PHIL 329 - Law and Philosophy (3)

Explores in detail classic problems in the law using the methods and resources of philosophy. Topics may include: the philosophy of punishment and theories of moral responsibility; charter equality rights and the nature of social equality; constitutional interpretation and the philosophy of language; the assessment of evidence and formal epistemology; the intellectual origins of the theory of natural law and natural rights. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 220, 221, ENV 320W, or with permission of instructor. Students with credit for PHIL 333 in Spring 2016 cannot take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Evan Tiffany
We 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 3253, Burnaby
PHIL 421W - Advanced Topics in Ethical Theory (4)

A highly focused, advanced examination of a selection of topics in normative or meta-ethics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: two 300 level PHIL courses; it is strongly recommended that students have taken some prior course in moral theory. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sam Black
We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby

and at least one of

PHIL 302 - Topics in Epistemology and Metaphysics (3)

An exploration of philosophical issues concerning, e.g.: causation, time, modality, or the self; the realism/nominalism or realism/idealism debate; relativism; the concept of truth; naturalized epistemology; global epistemological skepticism or perhaps a 'local' form of skepticism such as skepticism about induction or about sensory belief. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PHIL 201 or 203.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Philip Hanson
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
WMC 3250, Burnaby
WMC 3510, Burnaby
PHIL 341 - Philosophy of Science (3)

A study of the nature of scientific enquiry, classificatory systems, laws and theories, the role of observation in science, the demarcation between science and non-science, causality, the status of theoretical constructs, and teleological explanation. Prerequisite: Either one of: PHIL 201 or 203; or both of PHIL 100W (or equivalent) and COGS 200.

PHIL 343 - Philosophy of Mind (3)

A study of theories of the mind, consciousness, and human action. Prerequisite: Either one of: PHIL 201 or 203; or both of PHIL 100W (or equivalent) and COGS 200.

PHIL 344 - Philosophy of Language (3)

An introduction to the major philosophic theories of language. Topics to be considered include the relationship between language and mind, language and the world, language and society. Prerequisite: Either one of: PHIL 201 or 203; or both of PHIL 100W (or equivalent) and COGS 200.

and at least two of

PHIL 322 - History of Ethics (3)

An examination of an issue or selection of issues in the history of moral or political philosophy. Historical readings will be the primary focus and may include important figures such as Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Hume, and Kant. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 150, 151, 220 or 221.

PHIL 350 - Ancient Philosophy (3)

Examines central philosophical themes and figures in ancient philosophy. Topics may include justice, knowledge, the good life, time, change, appearance and reality, the nature of God, and others. Historical readings will be the central focus and may include works by Plato, Aristotle, Thales, Anaximander, Pythagoras, Parmenides and others. Prerequisite: PHIL 100W (or equivalent) or 150.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rosemary Twomey
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Th 9:30 AM – 11:20 AM
WMC 3250, Burnaby
SECB 1013, Burnaby
PHIL 352 - 17th Century Philosophy (3)

An examination of some central issues in 17th century philosophy. Themes may include: changing theories of causation, of the mind, and of the relation between mind and world. Historical readings will be the primary focus and may include important figures such as Descartes, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Malebranche, Spinoza, Leibniz, and Locke. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 100W (or equivalent) or 151. Students who have completed PHIL 353 or PHIL 354 prior to Fall 2006 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 David Heide
Mo 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 2200, Burnaby
PHIL 356 - 18th Century Philosophy (3)

An examination of some central issues of 18th century philosophy. Themes may include the development of the theory of ideas and epistemology associated with it. The primary focus may include important figures such as Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Condillac. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 100W (or equivalent) or 151. Students with credit for PHIL 355 prior to Fall 2006 may not take this course for further credit.

PHIL 357 - Topics in the History of Philosophy (3)

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 100W (or equivalent), 150, or 151.

PHIL 358 - 19th Century Philosophy (3)

An examination of some major figures in 19th century philosophy. Themes may include German idealism and romanticism, British idealism, positivism and American pragmatism; studied figures may include Schopenhauer, Fichte, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Comte, Kierkegaard, Brentano,Meinong, Mill, Pierce and James, depending on theme. Prerequisite: PHIL 100W (or equivalent) or 151.

PHIL 451W - Advanced Topics in the History of Philosophy (4)

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: two 300 level PHIL courses. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 David Heide
Fatema Amijee
Th 4:30 PM – 8:20 PM
RCB 5118, Burnaby

In addition, honours students complete the following two honours tutorial courses. To enroll in an honours tutorial, an honours student must prepare, in consultation with the proposed faculty supervisor, a document (normally one page or less) summarizing the topic and content of the tutorial and submit it to the Undergraduate Curriculum Chair for approval. Tutorials are usually approved only after the student is prepared for rigorous independent study by having completed sufficient upper-division coursework.

Tutorials offer sufficient time to examine in-depth several philosophical topics in a general area such as ethics, metaphysics, philosophy of mind, etc. The honours candidate must achieve a grade of B or higher in each honours tutorial to receive the honours degree.

PHIL 477 - Honours Tutorial I (5)

At least eight weeks prior to the term in which they wish to enrol in PHIL 477, honours students should arrange for faculty supervision of the course and arrange for departmental approval of a proposed syllabus. Open only to honours students. PHIL 477 is a requisite for all honours students. It must be taken concurrently with or prior to PHIL 478.

PHIL 478 - Honours Tutorial II (5)

At least eight weeks prior to the term in which they wish to enrol in PHIL 478, honours students should arrange for faculty supervision of the course and arrange for departmental approval of a proposed syllabus. Open only to honours students. Prerequisite: PHIL 478 is a requisite for all honours students. It must be taken concurrently with or consecutively to PHIL 477.

* unless counted as a history stream requirement

Seminars and Special Topics Courses

A student may not enrol in a philosophy seminar or selected topics course which duplicates work for which the student has received credit in another philosophy seminar or special topics course.

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Honours Requirements

For all bachelor of arts (BA) honours programs, students complete 132 units, which includes

  • at least 60 units that must be completed at Simon Fraser University
  • satisfaction of the writing, quantitative, and breadth requirements
  • students complete at least 60 upper division units, which must include at least 50 units in upper division courses in a Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences honours program; no more than 15 upper division units that have been transferred from another institution can be used toward this requirement
  • Students complete lower division requirements for at least one Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences honours program
  • students are required to achieve an overall cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and upper division CGPA of at least 3.0, and an honours program CGPA and upper division CGPA of at least 3.0

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student’s major subject
Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth Must be outside the student’s major subject, and may be lower or upper division
6 units Social Sciences: B-Soc
6 units Humanities: B-Hum
6 units Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth 6 units outside the student’s major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements)

Students choosing to complete a joint major, joint honours, double major, two extended minors, an extended minor and a minor, or two minors may satisfy the breadth requirements (designated or not designated) with courses completed in either one or both program areas.

 

Residency Requirements and Transfer Credit

  • At least half of the program's total units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.
  • At least two thirds of the program's total upper division units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.

Elective Courses

In addition to the courses listed above, students should consult an academic advisor to plan the remaining required elective courses.