Please note:

To view the Fall 2017 Academic Calendar go to http://www.sfu.ca/students/calendar/2017/fall.html

School of Resource and Environmental Management Simon Fraser University Calendar | Spring 2018

Resource and Environmental Management Major

Bachelor of Environment

This major takes full advantage of the expertise existing across FENV units, characteristic of BEnv majors. It will prepare students to enter positions or continue in graduate studies in the broadly defined area of resource management, including fisheries, agriculture, forestry, cultural resources, energy and tourism. REM program requirements, directed by educational goals, provide students with a solid understanding of the interplay of historical, biophysical and socio-cultural factors; Indigenous/First Nations Perspectives; resource use and sustainability; geospatial, statistical and modeling methodologies; decision making, communication, conflict resolution, and legislative/regulatory frameworks as they relate to resource management.

The REM program requirements include courses from each of the areas of study in the BEnv core (i.e. earth systems, ecology, biology, human role in nature, the social and built environments, environmental stewardship and governance, and the global scale).

Resource and Environmental Management Bachelor of Environment students are not eligible for the REM Minor.

Minimum Grades

The minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) for continuation and graduation is 2.00.

Program Requirements

Students complete 120 units, including at least 45 upper division units, as specified below.

Visit the program overview for a suggested course sequence.

Course Substitutions

Substitutions of program requirements, including courses deemed equivalent to these required courses, are not allowed without written permission from the program. Such courses taken without approval will not be applied to graduation requirements. Students should consult their academic advisor for details on obtaining permission for substitutions.

Lower Division

Complete all of

FNST 101 - Introduction to First Nations Studies (3)

Introduces the nature and goals of First Nations Studies as an academic discipline that emphasizes cultures and homelands of First Peoples. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Joyce Schneider
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 3159, Burnaby
D200 Joyce Schneider
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 3159, Burnaby
D201
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 9095, Burnaby
GEOG 111 - Earth Systems (3)

An introduction to landforms, climates, soils and vegetation; their origins, distributions, interrelationships and roles in the ecosystem. Laboratory work and field trips are included. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Andrew Perkins
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
D101
Fr 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 7108, Burnaby
D102
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7110, Burnaby
D103
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7108, Burnaby
D104
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
RCB 7108, Burnaby
D105
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
RCB 7110, Burnaby
D106
We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 7108, Burnaby
D107
We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 7108, Burnaby
D108
We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 7110, Burnaby
D109
We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7110, Burnaby
D110
We 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
RCB 7110, Burnaby
D111
Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 7110, Burnaby
D112
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 7110, Burnaby
D113
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 7110, Burnaby
D114
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7108, Burnaby
D115
Th 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
RCB 7108, Burnaby
D116
Fr 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7108, Burnaby
POL 253 - Introduction to Public Policy (3)

Explores the political dimensions of public policy making in Canada. Reviews theories and techniques in policy analysis, and focuses on the contemporary dynamics of public policy in various economic and social sectors from the point of view of political ideas, interests, institutions, and decision-making. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Stephen Gallagher
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCC 9000, Burnaby
D101
Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
D102
Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
D103
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
D104
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5014, Burnaby
F100 Benoit D├ęcary-Secours
We 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
REM 200 - Introduction to Resource and Environmental Management in Canada (3)

Explores the natural and social science foundations of resource and environmental management and demonstrates how that knowledge can be used in environmental decision-making. Provides a basic understanding of the nature and management of natural resources, strategic thinking for environmental planning, socio-economic and biophysical trade-offs in natural resource decision making and approaches for addressing uncertain knowledge. Prerequisite: One of REM 100, GEOG 100 or 111, or EVSC 100; and completion of at least 30 credits. Breadth-Social Sci/Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Duncan Knowler
Mo, We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 3005, Burnaby
D101
Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
D102
Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
D103
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D104
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
D105
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 4150, Burnaby

Choose 1 of

GEOG 251 - Quantitative Geography (3)

An introduction to basic quantitative techniques for the collection of geographic data. Topics include describing data, gathering samples, theoretical distributions, linking samples and populations, testing significance, and exploring spatial relationships all within practical, real-world application contexts. Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or 111. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Shivanand Balram
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SECB 1012, Burnaby
D101
Fr 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 2109, Burnaby
D102
Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 2109, Burnaby
D103
Fr 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 2109, Burnaby
STAT 101 - Introduction to Statistics (3)

The collection, description, analysis and summary of data, including the concepts of frequency distribution, parameter estimation and hypothesis testing. Intended to be particularly accessible to students who are not specializing in Statistics. Students cannot obtain credit for STAT 101 if they already have credit for - or are taking concurrently - STAT 201, 203, 285, or any upper division STAT course. Quantitative.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
STAT 201 - Statistics for the Life Sciences (3)

Research methodology and associated statistical analysis techniques for students with training in the life sciences. Intended to be particularly accessible to students who are not specializing in Statistics. Students cannot obtain credit for STAT 201 if they already have credit for - or are taking concurrently - STAT 101, 203, 285, or any upper division STAT course. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D900 Jack Davis
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 2600, Surrey
SUR 2600, Surrey
OP09
TBD
STAT 203 - Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences (3)

Descriptive and inferential statistics aimed at students in the social sciences. Scales of measurement. Descriptive statistics. Measures of association. Hypothesis tests and confidence intervals. Students in Sociology and Anthropology are expected to take SA 255 before this course. Intended to be particularly accessible to students who are not specializing in Statistics. Prerequisite: Recommended: a research methods course such as SA 255, CRIM 220, POL 213 or equivalent is recommended prior to taking STAT 203. Students cannot obtain credit for STAT 203 if they already have credit for - or are taking concurrently - STAT 101, 201, 285, or any upper division STAT course. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
OP01
TBD
STAT 270 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3)

Basic laws of probability, sample distributions. Introduction to statistical inference and applications. Prerequisite: or Corequisite: MATH 152 or 155 or 158. Students wishing an intuitive appreciation of a broad range of statistical strategies may wish to take STAT 100 first. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Boxin Tang
Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
We, Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
EDB 7618, Burnaby
SWH 10081, Burnaby
D900 Maryam DehghaniEstarki
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SUR 3170, Surrey
SUR 3170, Surrey
OP01
TBD
OP09
TBD

Choose 1 of

BISC 101 - General Biology (4)

An introduction to the biochemical and physiological mechanisms of living organisms. Topics covered include cell structure and function, DNA replication and the flow of genetic information, enzyme function, metabolism and physiology of microorganisms, plants, and animals. Prerequisite: High school biology 12 (or equivalent) with a C grade or better, or BISC 100 with C- or better, or BISC 113 with C+ or better, or HSCI 100 with C+ or better. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kevin Lam
Peter Hollmann
Zamir Punja
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Th 9:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
D101 Peter Hollmann
Tu 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCB 8206, Burnaby
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D102 Peter Hollmann
Tu 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SSCB 8210, Burnaby
RCB 7100, Burnaby
D103 Peter Hollmann
Tu 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCB 8206, Burnaby
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D104 Peter Hollmann
Tu 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SSCB 8210, Burnaby
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D105 Peter Hollmann
Tu 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCB 8206, Burnaby
AQ 4125, Burnaby
D106 Peter Hollmann
Tu 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCB 8210, Burnaby
AQ 4125, Burnaby
D107 Peter Hollmann
We 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCB 8206, Burnaby
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D108 Peter Hollmann
We 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SSCB 8210, Burnaby
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D109 Peter Hollmann
We 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCB 8206, Burnaby
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D110 Peter Hollmann
We 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SSCB 8210, Burnaby
RCB 7100, Burnaby
D111 Peter Hollmann
We 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCB 8206, Burnaby
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D112 Peter Hollmann
We 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
Fr 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCB 8210, Burnaby
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D113 Peter Hollmann
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Th 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5014, Burnaby
SSCB 8206, Burnaby
D114 Peter Hollmann
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
Th 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
WMC 2531, Burnaby
SSCB 8210, Burnaby
D115 Peter Hollmann
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Th 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5016, Burnaby
SSCB 8206, Burnaby
D116 Peter Hollmann
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Th 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5004, Burnaby
SSCB 8210, Burnaby
BISC 102 - General Biology (4)

Survey of the diversity of life, and its evolutionary history on earth. The student is introduced to the study of genetics, development, and evolution, giving an overview of how these processes interact to produce form and function. Also included are principles of behavior and ecological relationships of organisms to each other and their environment. Prerequisite: High school biology 12 (or equivalent) with a C grade or better, or BISC 100 with C- or better, or BISC 113 with C+ or better, or HSCI 100 with C+ or better. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ronald Ydenberg
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
DFA 300, Burnaby
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
D101 Erin Barley
Tu 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D102 Erin Barley
Tu 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D103 Erin Barley
Tu 1:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
RCB 7101, Burnaby
D104 Erin Barley
Tu 1:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D105 Onkar Bains
We 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
AQ 5050, Burnaby
D106 Onkar Bains
We 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
AQ 5048, Burnaby
D107 Onkar Bains
We 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
AQ 5014, Burnaby
D108 Onkar Bains
We 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
AQ 5047, Burnaby
D109
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
AQ 5035, Burnaby
D110
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D111
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
Th 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
D112
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Th 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
D113 Onkar Bains
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Th 1:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 3531, Burnaby
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
D114 Onkar Bains
Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Th 1:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
D115
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
Fr 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
BLU 11901, Burnaby
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
D116
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Fr 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
BLU 10901, Burnaby
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
D200 Ivona Mladenovic
We, Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SUR 2600, Surrey
D201
Mo 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SUR 2990, Surrey
D202
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SUR 2990, Surrey
D203
Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 2990, Surrey
D204
Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SUR 2710, Surrey
D205
Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SUR 2995, Surrey
D206
Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SUR 2710, Surrey
LAS1 Ivona Mladenovic
Tu 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 2960, Surrey
LAS2 Ivona Mladenovic
Tu 12:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SUR 2960, Surrey
LAS3 Ivona Mladenovic
Tu 3:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SUR 2960, Surrey

Choose 1 of

ENV 221 - Systems Thinking and the Environment (3)

Introduces systems thinking in the context of environmental and sustainability challenges using system archetypes and system dynamics theory. Analytical and modeling techniques are applied to understand and project systems complexity. Prerequisite: One of: Math 12 Foundations of Mathematics, Math 12 Pre-calculus, MATH 100, MATH 197 or MATH 198. And one of: EVSC 100, GEOG 102, GEOG 111 or REM 100. Quantitative.

ENV 222 - Environmental Controversy: An interdisciplinary study of environmental issues (3)

Through lecture, field experiences, guest presentations and group projects, students will explore the complexity within a number of key environmental controversies, exploring its scientific, social, cultural, ethical, legal and personal aspects. Prerequisite: One of the following: ARCH 100, EVSC 100, GEOG 102, GEOG 111, REM 100 or REM 200 and completion of 24 units. Students who have received credit for ENV 399 (Environmental Controversy) cannot receive credit for ENV 222. Breadth-Social Sci/Science.

Choose 1 of

GEOG 253 - Introduction to Remote Sensing (3)

An introduction to the theory and practice of remote sensing, including the relevant physical processes, digital image processing and information extraction, and a review of remote sensing applications. Prerequisite: GEOG 111. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Andres Varhola
Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 3003, Burnaby
D101
We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 2109, Burnaby
D102
We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 2109, Burnaby
D103
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 2109, Burnaby
GEOG 255 - Geographical Information Science I (3)

A basic overview of Geographical Information Systems and Science; GIS software, hardware, data structures and models; spatial data, operations and algorithms; practical applications and limitations. Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or 111 or permission of instructor. Students with credit for GEOG 354 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Taylor Anderson
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SSCC 9000, Burnaby
D101
We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 2111, Burnaby
D102
We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 2111, Burnaby
D103
We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 2111, Burnaby

Choose 1 of

ARCH 201 - Reconstructing the Human Past (4)

A survey of methods used by archaeologists to discover and interpret the past. Examples will be drawn from selected sites and cultures around the world. S. Students who have taken ARCH 101 may not enrol in ARCH 201. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 David Maxwell
Mo, We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SECB 1010, Burnaby
ARCH 286 - Cultural Heritage Management (4)

Examines cultural heritage management as the universal process by which people use places, objects and traditions from the past to educate, entertain, profit, promote change, maintain status quo, create identities, and build communities and nations. The course presents archaeology as one aspect of cultural heritage management and as an activity governed by national laws and international conventions for protecting and making appropriate use of heritage. Using case studies from Canada and abroad, the course explores stewardship as a fundamental professional ethic in archaeology and other fields engaged in studying, applying, and safeguarding personal, familial, communal, national, and transnational heritage. Prerequisite: 30 units including one of ARCH 100, ARCH 201, GEOG 100 or REM 100. Breadth-Humanities.

Choose 1 of

EVSC 100 - Introduction to Environmental Science (3)

Introduces students to the study of environmental science. Lecture material spans contributing disciplines, emphasizing integration of diverse concepts to understand environmental problems. Tutorials develop core academic skills in environmental science context. Students who have completed EVSC 200 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Marnie Branfireun
Fr 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 3310, Surrey
D101 Marnie Branfireun
Fr 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SUR 3150, Surrey
D102 Marnie Branfireun
Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SUR 2995, Surrey
D103 Marnie Branfireun
Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SUR 2995, Surrey
D300 Marnie Branfireun
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SWH 10041, Burnaby
D301 Marnie Branfireun
We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
WMC 2533, Burnaby
D302 Marnie Branfireun
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 2533, Burnaby
D303 Marnie Branfireun
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
D304 Marnie Branfireun
Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
D305 Marnie Branfireun
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5014, Burnaby
D306 Marnie Branfireun
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5020, Burnaby
GEOG 215 - Biogeography (3)

An examination of the abiotic and biotic factors that control the distribution and development of plant communities, including climatic and geological change. Prerequisite: GEOG 111. Students with credit for BISC 204 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sarah Thomsen
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2202, Burnaby
D101
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7108, Burnaby
D102
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 7108, Burnaby
D103
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 7108, Burnaby
BISC 204 - Introduction to Ecology (3)

An introduction to biotic-environmental relationships and dynamics; ecological concepts; population dynamics, variation, adaptation and evolution. Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102 with a grade of C- or better. Students with credit for GEOG 215 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jennifer Cory
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Th 9:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 3181, Burnaby
BLU 9660, Burnaby
D101
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D102
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
D103
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D104
Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
BLU 10901, Burnaby
D105
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
D106
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby

Choose 1 of

FNST 212 - Indigenous Perceptions of Landscape (3)

Indigenous peoples of North America possess perceptions of landscape rooted in their long history with the land. Using methods and theories designed for anthropology, archaeology, land and resource management planning and geography will bring a multi-disciplinary approach to this study of cultural landscapes. Prerequisite: FNST 101 or 201W.

GEOG 221 - Economic Geography (3)

The basic concepts of economic geography, involving consideration of the spatial organization and development of economic and resource based systems. Prerequisite: GEOG 100. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rosemary-Claire Collard
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SECB 1014, Burnaby
D101
Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D102
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
D103
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
GEOG 241 - Social Geography (3)

Systematic consideration of the spatial and environmental bases of societies, in historical and cultural perspective. Prerequisite: GEOG 100. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jason Young
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5018, Burnaby
D101
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
D102
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
D103
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
REM 281 - Introduction to Sustainable Community Development (3)

Builds an understanding of strengths and weaknesses of conventional approaches to development; rationale for alternative approaches; varying interpretations of community and of development; and essential components for creating local economic development strategies. Sustainable community development is introduced as a framework to meet current social and economic needs while ensuring adequate resources are available for future generations. Prerequisite: 30 units. Not permitted for credit toward the Sustainable Community Development Post Baccalaureate Diploma. Students with credit for SCD 201 or REM 201 or SD 281 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

or SD 281 - Introduction to Sustainable Community Development (3)

First required course for the SCD Certificate. Builds an understanding of strengths and weaknesses of conventional approaches to development; rationale for alternative approaches; varying interpretations of community and of development; and essential components for creating local economic development strategies. Sustainable Community Development is introduced as a framework to meet current social and economic needs while ensuring adequate resources are available for future generations. Prerequisite: 30 units or SCD Certificate program approval or permission of the Director of the Sustainable Development Program. Not permitted for credit toward the SCD Post Baccalaureate Diploma. Corequisite: Students may not complete this course concurrently with upper division SD courses. Students with credit for SCD 201 or REM 201 or REM 281 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education

Upper Division

Historical and Socio-Cultural Perspectives (choose two of:)

ARCH 363 - Landscape Archaeology (3)

The interpretation of archaeological evidence to look at the ways that people in the past perceived, constructed, and used their natural surroundings and their built environments. Prerequisite: ARCH 100 or ARCH 201, and 45 credit hours.

ARCH 365 - Archaeological Perspectives on Human Ecology (3)

Examines methods, theories, and concepts for understanding how past cultures interacted with their bio-physical surroundings. Integrates diverse kinds of data and knowledge to understand these relationships. Topics to be addressed include local and traditional ecological knowledge, paleoenvironmental reconstruction, human-environment interaction, human-induced environmental changes, paleodiet, and domestication. Prerequisite: ARCH 201; or any two of ARCH 100, REM 100, GEOG 100, EVSC 100; and 45 credits.

ENV 320W - Ethics and the Environment (3)

An introduction to the field of environmental ethics for non-specialists. Addresses questions such as what obligations we have to future generations and the natural world, as well as the extent of these obligations. Prerequisite: Students must have earned at least 45 units. Students who have taken PHIL 333-3 or ENV 399-3 "Special Topics in Environmental Ethics" prior to or in 2011 and students with credit in PHIL 328-3 may not enroll in this course for further credit. Philosophy Majors and Minors may not take this course for credit towards their major or minor degree. Writing.

GEOG 377 - Environmental History (4)

Examines the reciprocal influences between humans and nature through time. Topics may include settlement, agriculture, technology, politics, urbanization, science, and conservation. Prerequisite: 45 units with nine of lower division Geography units. Students with credit for HIST 377 may not take this course for further credit.

or HIST 377 - Environmental History (4)

Examines the reciprocal influences between humans and nature through time. Topics may include settlement, agriculture, technology, politics, urbanization, science, and conservation. Prerequisite: 45 units, including six units of lower division history. Students with credit for GEOG 377 may not take this course for further credit.

GEOG 389W - Nature and Society (4)

Examines the relationship between nature and society, covering the dominant geographical approaches to human-environment interaction, and their social, spatial, and political economic effects. Prerequisite: GEOG 221 or GEOG 241 (Students who received credit for EVSC 200 before 2011 may use it to meet the prerequisite requirement for this course). Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 John Pierce
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 4150, Burnaby
D101
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5020, Burnaby
D102
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2533, Burnaby
D103
We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2260, Burnaby

Indigenous/First Nations Perspectives (choose one of:)

FNST 332 - Ethnobotany of British Columbia First Nations (3)

This course is an introduction to the study of plant knowledge and use by First Nations peoples in British Columbia. It provides students with information about the role of plants in First Nations' cultures including such areas as foods, medicines, technology, ceremony, ecological indicators, and within First Nations' knowledge and classification systems. Special focus may be placed on the ethnobotany of one or more Aboriginal groups or culture areas. Prerequisite: FNST 101. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Robert Bandringa
Fr 10:30 AM – 1:20 PM
SWH 9095, Burnaby
FNST 353W - First Nations Heritage Stewardship (3)

Examines issues that arise when Aboriginal people must balance economic development and cultural integrity. Topics include self-reflexive internalist research, ethics and best practices in representing Indigenous heritage, public laws and land claim agreements affecting heritage, the exhumation and repatriation of human remains and religious freedom and access to sacred sites and objects. Prerequisite: 45 units or permission of the instructor. Students who have taken FNST 322 previously under this topic may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

FNST 401 - Aboriginal Peoples and Public Policy (3)

An examination of First Nations and Aboriginal peoples' perspectives on political, social and legal issues involving their rights as first citizens of Canada and North America, and the practical and political relations with various levels of government. Issues examined include: Aboriginal rights and title questions, self government models and concepts, constitutional matters, the impact of federal government policies, including their impact on women's lives, and Aboriginal community and First Nations politics. Prerequisite: FNST 101 and 201W. Recommended: POL 221.

FNST 433 - Indigenous Environmental Justice and Activism (4)

Examines contemporary writings regarding Indigenous environmental logic and environmental concerns of contemporary times. Studies effects of resource extraction upon Indigenous nations, globalization, genetic modifications, health, intellectual property, spiritual beliefs, culture and society, art and language and compares these with specific Indigenous logic at the time of contact. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Biophysical Perspectives (choose one of:)

GEOG 315 - World Ecosystems (4)

Distribution, structure, function, and dynamics of the world's major biomes. Attention to comparative aspects among terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and to environmental problems associated with the biomes. Prerequisite: GEOG 215 or BISC 204.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Lance Lesack
We, Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
BLU 10011, Burnaby
D101
We 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 7108, Burnaby
D102
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5035, Burnaby
D103
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 7110, Burnaby
GEOG 317 - Soil Science (4)

An introduction to the study of soils: physical, chemical and biological properties of soils; soil formation, description, classification, survey and use. Field and laboratory techniques of soil analysis. Prerequisite: One of GEOG 213, 214, 215, or CHEM 121. Students with credit for GEOG 318 may not take this course for further credit.

REM 311 - Applied Ecology and Sustainable Environments (3)

Students will learn to apply the ecological concepts introduced in prereq courses to applied ecological problems at the population, community, and ecosystem levels of organization. Emphasis will be placed on processes which drive ecological dynamics, on recognizing those processes and dynamics in applied contexts, and on interpreting ecological data. Prerequisite: REM 100 or EVSC 100; BISC 204 or GEOG 215; STAT 101 or GEOG 251 or STAT 201 or equivalent. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Scott Harrison
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
BLU 10011, Burnaby
D101
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 3148.2, Burnaby
D102
Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 3148.2, Burnaby
D103
Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 3148.2, Burnaby

Resource Management: Information Integration and Trade-offs in Decision Making (choose two of:)

ENV 321 - Ecological Economics (4)

Introduces students to the concepts and methods of ecological economics. Provides students with grounding in the core principles of conventional economics applied to the environment but then extends this to the integration of economics and ecology to create a new ecological-economic understanding of environmental change and sustainability. Prerequisite: Minimum of 45 units. Students with credit for REM 321 cannot take ENV 321 for further credit.

or REM 321 - Ecological Economics (4)

Introduces students to the concepts and methods of ecological economics. Provides students with grounding in the core principles of conventional economics applied to the environment but then extends this to the integration of economics and ecology to create a new ecological-economic understanding of environmental change and sustainability. Prerequisite: minimum of 45 units. Students with credit for ENV 321 cannot take REM 321 for further credit.

GEOG 322W - World Resources (4)

An analysis of the use and development of natural resources from a geographic, economic and institutional perspective. Prerequisite: At least 30 units including GEOG 221. Students with credit for GEOG 322 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Alex Clapp
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCC 9000, Burnaby
D101
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D102
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
GEOG 327 - Geography of Tourism (4)

Factors underlying the changing geography of tourism. Issues of demand, supply and impact are examined. Prerequisite: GEOG 221 or 241, or permission of the instructor.

GEOG 385 - Agriculture and the Environment (4)

An examination of the relationship between agricultural production systems and the biophysical environment, with emphasis on the origins of, and potential solutions to, agri-environmental degradation. Prerequisite: GEOG 221.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Christiana Miewald
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
HCC 2510, Vancouver
D101
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
HCC 2280, Vancouver
D102
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
HCC 1530, Vancouver
D103
Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
HCC 2235, Vancouver
REM 350 - Sustainable Energy and Materials Management (4)

Takes an interdisciplinary approach to sustainable management of society's energy and materials flows. Topics range from thermodynamics and estimates of global resources to market-based policies and governance Institutions. Peak oil, renewable energy and carbon capture and storage are also discussed. The role for green consumerism in light of climate challenge are highlighted. Prerequisite: 45 credit hours.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mark Jaccard
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
SWH 10081, Burnaby
D101
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D102
Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D103
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 4115, Burnaby
D104
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D105
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
D106
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D107
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D108
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D109
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D110
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D111
Tu 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D112
Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
REM 370 - Global Resource Issues in Oceanography (3)

Introduces principles of oceanography, including ocean circulation, ocean carbon cycling, nutrients and biological productivity, oceans and the climate system, and ocean resource contributions to global food supply. Provides basic understanding of ocean resource management including transportation, recreation, fisheries, and mining. Prerequisite: EASC 100, EVSC 100, GEOG 111, or REM 100.

REM 445 - Environmental Risk Assessment (3)

Students receive theory and practical experience in the control and management of hazardous substances in the environment. This includes the application of techniques used to assess toxicological, ecological and human health risks of contaminants within the current regulatory framework. Prerequisite: MATH 151 or 154 or 157; STAT 101 or 103 or 201 or 301 or GEOG 251.

REM 471 - Forest Ecosystem Management (3)

Students will examine the problems of managing forest ecosystems for a variety of societal goals and objectives. The course will start with an examination of the ecological characteristics of forest ecosystems and their dynamics. The second section will focus on the objectives and tools of forest management in an ecological context. The final section of the course will focus on the institutions, economics and policies of forest management, with a focus on British Columbia's historical and current management issues. This course will involve lectures, group discussions, field trips, and exercises. Prerequisite: At least one of REM 311, BISC 304, BISC 310, BISC 404, GEOG 315, or GEOG 316.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ken Lertzman
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
BLU 10011, Burnaby
D101
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5047, Burnaby
D102
We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D103
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5035, Burnaby

Methods to Inform Decision Making (choose one of:)

GEOG 351 - Multimedia Cartography (4)

Elements of cartographic analysis, design and visualization, with an emphasis on digital mapping, animation techniques, cartographic software and internet mapping. Prerequisite: GEOG 255. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Suzana Dragicevic
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
BLU 10011, Burnaby
D101
Fr 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 2111, Burnaby
D102
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 2111, Burnaby
D103
Fr 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 2111, Burnaby
GEOG 352 - Spatial Analysis (4)

Advanced quantitative techniques for spatial analysis of geographic data and patterns. Topics include geostatistics, spatial interpolation, autocorrelation, kriging, and their use in geographic problem solving with spatial analysis software. Prerequisite: GEOG 251 or one of STAT 101, 201, 203 (formerly 103), or 270. Quantitative.

GEOG 353 - Advanced Remote Sensing (4)

Advanced remote sensing principles and techniques, including physics-based modeling, advanced classifiers, automated data processing, and integration of ancillary data products. Prerequisite: GEOG 253. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Andres Varhola
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5018, Burnaby
D101
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 2109, Burnaby
D102
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 2109, Burnaby
GEOG 355 - Geographical Information Science II (4)

An examination of technical components of GIS. Topics include spatial representations, generalization and data management; computational algebra and set theory; digital surfaces and terrain models. Prerequisite: GEOG 255. Quantitative.

GEOG 356 - 3D Geovisualization (4)

3D geovisualization methods, concepts and theory. Bridges conventional geographic visualization with emerging 3D methods. Emphasizes user-centered design and cognitive implications. Prerequisite: GEOG 255.

REM 412 - Environmental Modeling (3)

Students receive hands-on experience in the construction and analysis of computer simulation models of environmental and ecological systems and problems. Prerequisite: REM 100 or EVSC 100; BISC 204 or GEOG 215; STAT 101 or 201 or 203 or 270 or equivalent; 60 units. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Steve Conrad
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
BLU 10011, Burnaby
D101
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 3148.1, Burnaby
D102
Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 3148.1, Burnaby
D103
Mo 9:30 AM – 10:30 AM
AQ 3148.1, Burnaby

Communication and Conflict Resolution (choose one of:)

CMNS 342 - Science and Public Policy: Risk Communication (4)

The course examines communication in the relation between science (technology) and public policy, and more particularly, in the evaluation of risk. Prerequisite: Two of CMNS 260, 261, or 262.

CMNS 347 - Communication in Conflict and Intervention (4)

The role of communication, and in particular the mass media, in various types of conflict and the uses of communication-based strategies in the intervention, arbitration and mediation of those conflicts. Prerequisite: 60 units including CMNS 110 and 130. Recommended: CMNS 247 and 362.

CMNS 349 - Environment, Media and Communication (4)

An examination of how media, culture and communication shape public opinion and behaviour about environmental issues such as global warming, (un)sustainable resource use and pollution, with special attention to the impact of practices such as advertising, public relations, science and risk communication, journalism and advocacy communication upon public discourse about the environment, and the role of dialogue and deliberation in mediating and resolving conflict over environmental issues. Prerequisite: 60 units, including at least one upper division course in CMNS, DIAL, EVSC, GEOG or BlSC. Students with credit for CMNS 388 (in Summer 2010, Spring 2011, or Summer 2012) may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Shane Gunster
Mo 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
HCC 1800, Vancouver
E101
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
HCC 2235, Vancouver
E102
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
HCC 2235, Vancouver
E103
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
HCC 2235, Vancouver
J100 Shane Gunster
Mo 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
HCC 1800, Vancouver
J101
Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
HCC 2205, Vancouver
J102
Mo 8:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 2205, Vancouver
CMNS 447 - Negotiation and Dialogue as Communication (4)

This course provides frameworks and tools with which to understand and evaluate negotiation as a form of communication. The objective of the course is to provide an understanding of the role of communication in the negotiating process, and the consequences of different kinds of negotiation strategies in intercultural, international, competitive, and conflictual situations. It combines theoretical discussion with practical case studies, involves guest negotiators and analysts, and provides an appreciation of the world-wide scale and importance of negotiation as a basis for clarifying relationships. Prerequisite: 75 units, including CMNS 347, and at least one other CMNS or DIAL upper division course.

DIAL 390W - Semester: Dialogue (5)

The Dialogue component of the Semester in Dialogue will immerse students in the art and practice of thinking and communicating. The focus will be on strategies and methods to use in understanding diverse perspectives. Students will have an opportunity to expand their verbal and written communication skills as well as explore dialogue as a developing academic field. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students should apply prior to the term in which they wish to enrol. Students can be accepted into either the Summer Institute in Dialogue (DIAL 390W and 391W, 10 units) or the Semester in Dialogue (fall or spring term, DIAL 390W, 391W and 392W, 15 units), but not both. Writing/Breadth-Hum/Soc Sci.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Diane Finegood
Mo, Tu, We, Th, Fr 9:30 AM – 4:50 PM
HCC 3050, Vancouver
DIAL 460 - Seminar in Dialogue and Public Issues (4)

Focuses on the practical tools and conceptual approaches used in dialogue, with comparisons of the role and impact of dialogue among community, government, corporate, union, First Nations, legal-regulatory, advocacy groups and organizations. Emphasis is on interaction among interest groups and stakeholders, cultures of negotiation and decision-making, techniques of facilitation, and strategies for effective outcomes. Prerequisite: 45 units and permission of instructor. Students with credit for CMNS 460 may not complete this course for further credit.

Legislation, Policy and Regulation (choose one of:)

ARCH 386 - Archaeological Resource Management (3)

Surveys the origins, implementations, and need for archaeological heritage legislation on an international and national scale. Topical issues associated with contract archaeology, public archaeology, native heritage, and avocational societies are incorporated. Prerequisite: ARCH 201.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Bob Muir
We 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 6136, Burnaby
ENV 319 - Environmental Law (3)

Provides a practical introduction to the legal system governing the use and protection of the environment in Canada. A central theme is the difference between the law on paper and the law in practice. Prerequisite: Students must have earned at least 45 units. Students who have taken ENV 399-3 "Special Topics in Enviromental Law" in 2012 may not enroll in this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
HCC 2510, Vancouver
GEOG 445 - Resource Planning (4)

This course introduces the student to the principles and practices of resource planning within a Canadian context. Special attention is paid to land-use planning as it relates to major resource sectors. Prerequisite: One of GEOG 322, 363, 383, or 389.

REM 356 - Institutional Arrangements for Sustainable Environmental Management (3)

This course provides an overview of some basic legislation, agencies, and policies which currently are in use to regulate the natural environment at the international, nation, provincial, regional, and local levels. Its purpose is to present a basic set of evaluative questions which can be used to address the effectiveness and efficiency of the environmental regulatory and management systems currently in use. Prerequisite: REM 100.

Capstone Experience (choose one of:)

DIAL 460 - Seminar in Dialogue and Public Issues (4) *

Focuses on the practical tools and conceptual approaches used in dialogue, with comparisons of the role and impact of dialogue among community, government, corporate, union, First Nations, legal-regulatory, advocacy groups and organizations. Emphasis is on interaction among interest groups and stakeholders, cultures of negotiation and decision-making, techniques of facilitation, and strategies for effective outcomes. Prerequisite: 45 units and permission of instructor. Students with credit for CMNS 460 may not complete this course for further credit.

DIAL 461 - Field Placement in Dialogue (3) *

Students work under faculty supervision in a placement where dialogue is planned or where dialogue occurs. Arrangements are the responsibility of the student, and enrolment is limited. Prerequisite: 45 units and permission of instructor. Students with credit for CMNS 461 may not complete this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Janet Moore
Tara Mahoney
Mo, We 9:30 AM – 3:20 PM
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
,
,
ENV 491 - Directed Study in Environment (3) *

Independent study on environmental topics selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. A directed study proposal must be completed and approved by the instructor, the home departmental advisor and the Faculty of Environment advisor prior to registration. Students may take this course only once. Variable units: 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8. Prerequisite: 60 units, 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

ENV 495 - Environmental Capstone (4)

This project-based course, to be taken in the final year of undergraduate study, will provide students with an opportunity to integrate and demonstrate the knowledge and skills gained through their undergraduate study. Projects involve collaborative work, analytical methodologies and communication of environmental complexity. Prerequisite: 90 units.

GEOG 497 - International Field Study (5) *

A fieldwork based study of a selected region conducted in an international setting. Emphasis is placed on how to understand landscapes by relating concepts and models with direct observation, inference and collection of field evidence, as well as published literature on the selected region. Prerequisite: At least 60 units including 12 units of upper division geography courses.

* Requires ERM director's approval prior to enrollment

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student’s major subject
Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth Must be outside the student’s major subject, and may be lower or upper division
6 units Social Sciences: B-Soc
6 units Humanities: B-Hum
6 units Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth 6 units outside the student’s major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements)

Students choosing to complete a joint major, joint honours, double major, two extended minors, an extended minor and a minor, or two minors may satisfy the breadth requirements (designated or not designated) with courses completed in either one or both program areas.

 

Residency Requirements and Transfer Credit

  • At least half of the program's total units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.
  • At least two thirds of the program's total upper division units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.