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School of Engineering Science | Faculty of Applied Sciences Simon Fraser University Calendar | Fall 2019

Engineering Science, Electronics Engineering Option Major

Bachelor of Applied Science

This program leads to a bachelor of applied science degree with an electronics engineering option.

Engineering science students develop skills in systems design with a high level of scientific knowledge. This demanding program is aimed at the superior student. The program produces well educated, innovative engineer/scientists with entrepreneurial skills and attitudes who are oriented to new technologies. Program entry is competitive.

Students undertake a basic core of pure, applied and engineering sciences followed by studies in a specialized option. The general BASc program may be completed in eight academic terms plus a minimum of three co-op terms.

ENSC courses emphasize learning, conceptualization, design and analysis. Built into the program are courses on social impacts of technology, finance, management, design methods and entrepreneurship intended to complement scientific studies. A special, integrated communications course completed throughout the program ensures that all graduates have the communication skills necessary to be effective engineers.

This electronics engineering option directly relates to microelectronics and its applications in communications, control and computing. Engineers in this field design and fabricate systems utilizing electronic components and subsystems.

Admission Requirements

The program begins each fall term. However, admitted students may enter in any term.

For detailed University admission requirements, visit www.sfu.ca/students/admission/admission-requirements.html or email admissionsteam@sfu.ca. For more detailed School of Engineering Science admission information, visit www.sfu.ca/engineering.html, or send an email to asadvise@sfu.ca.

Minimum Admission Requirements

Applicants must be eligible for University admission, must submit a University application, and must have successfully completed the following high school courses: physics 12, mathematics 12, chemistry 12, and English 12.

External Transfer from Another Post-Secondary Institution

Admission is competitive. A minimum of 24 units of transferable coursework is required, including:

  • at least one mathematics course chosen from: MATH 152, MATH 232 (or 240);
  • at least one computing course chosen from: CMPT 128 (or 135; or (125 and 127)), and 225;
  • at least one physics course chosen from: PHYS 121 (or 141), PHYS 221, and PHYS 321

Please see www.sfu.ca/students/admission/admission-requirements.html for further information.

Internal Transfer from Another Simon Fraser University Program

Simon Fraser University students who wish to transfer to Engineering Science from another program must have an engineering-related grade point average (ERGPA) at Simon Fraser University of at least 2.5 with fewer than 6 repeated courses. In addition, in the term prior to requesting the transfer to the School of Engineering Science, the student must have been enrolled in at least 12 Simon Fraser University credits and earned a term GPA of 2.5 or higher.

Simon Fraser University students applying for admission to the School of Engineering Science are selected for admission on the basis of an engineering-related grade point average (ERGPA). The ERGPA is calculated over all courses the student has taken from this list, where a minimum of 3 courses from this list is required, such that:

  • at least one mathematics course chosen from MATH 151 (or 150), MATH 152, MATH 232 (or 240), MACM 101, MACM 201
  • at least one computing course chosen from CMPT 128 or 135 or (125 and 127), 225 and 275
  • at least one physics course chosen from PHYS 120 (or 140), PHYS 121 (or 141), PHYS 221, PHYS 321, PHYS 365
  • additional courses may include: CHEM 121

All three courses must be completed prior to application. For complete information, contact an Applied Sciences Advisor. If a course is a duplicate of any previous course completed at Simon Fraser University or elsewhere, only the last attempt will be included in the average. Admission is competitive and the admission average is established on a per term basis, depending on the number of spaces available.

Second Degree

Please see www.sfu.ca/students/calendar/programs/engineering-science-second-degree/bachelor-of-applied-science.html for information on the requirements for admission to the second degree program. Program requirements for the Electronics Engineering Option are listed below.

Minimum Grading Requirements

A C- grade or better in prerequisite courses is required to enroll in Engineering Science courses. In addition, students are required to have a minimum CGPA of 2.4 to enroll in 300 and 400 level Engineering Science courses. Engineering Science students with a CGPA below 2.4 need to see an advisor to obtain approval before enrolling. Students outside the Faculty of Applied Science may not enroll with a CGPA below 2.4. Please see https://www.sfu.ca/students/calendar/faculties-research/faculty-applied-sciences.html for information on the minimum CGPA required to remain in the Engineering Science program.

Minimum Course Load Policy

SFU ENSC students are expected to maintain a minimum course load of 12 units per term. Students are permitted to take fewer units in exceptional circumstances, provided that the average number of units per enrolled term does not drop below 10 units/term.

The minimum course load policy will be enforced once per year, after the completion of the Spring term. The Progress Rate will be calculated for each student as the number of units divided by the number of enrolled terms (excluding coop). Students who at the time of evaluation have a Progress Rate below the required minimum of 10.00 units/term, will be transferred to the BGS program.

Students who have completed 120 credits of the Engineering Science program are exempt from the minimum Progress Rate requirement, however they still have to meet the other requirements (i.e. minimum CGPA requirements, timely completion of coop, etc.).

Co-operative Education Work Experience

Every engineering science student completes three (3) work terms of practical experience in an appropriate industrial or research setting leading to a project under the technical direction of a practising engineer or scientist. The goal is a complementary combination of work in an industrial or research setting and study in one of the engineering options. The internship may be within the University but in most cases the work site is off campus.

After the first year, students typically alternate between academic and work terms.

At least two of the three mandatory work terms must be completed in industry (ENSC 195, 295, 395). Students may participate in additional work terms but are encouraged to seek diversity in their experience. The three mandatory work terms may include one special co-op term (ENSC 196, 296, 396). Special co-op may include, but is not restricted to, self-directed, entrepreneurial, service or research co-op work terms. Permission of the engineering science co-op office is required.

An optional non-technical work term (ENSC 194) is also available through the engineering science co-operative education office and is often completed after the first two study terms. ENSC 194 does not count toward the mandatory three course requirement.

Upper Division Enrollment Requirements

To be eligible to enroll in upper division engineering courses, excluding ENSC 320, students must have declared their option. Before a student can declare their option, they must have successfully completed at least one co-op term (ENSC 194, ENSC 195, or ENSC 196). Students that fail to complete the first co-op as scheduled will be required to meet with an Academic Advisor from the Faculty of Applied Sciences. Failure to complete the first co-op in a timely fashion will result in the student being transferred to the BGS Applied Sciences program.

There is an absolute minimum of 80 units completed to enroll in 400-level courses. Please note that specific courses may have higher requirements.

Program Requirements

Students complete the engineering science core course requirements as shown below, which includes additional course requirements for this electronics engineering option. These courses provide basic science, general studies, engineering science, specialized engineering and science, and project and laboratory work.

This program’s core course requirements also consist of non-technical courses which broaden education and develop awareness of social, economic and managerial factors affecting engineering and scientific work.

Although there is no strict requirement to complete the curriculum in the sequence that is strongly suggested by the school, deviating from the course completion schedule may lead to scheduling and prerequisite problems in subsequent terms. To view the suggested course schedule, visit http://www.sfu.ca/engineering/undergraduate_students/academic-programs/electronics/curriculum-revised.html.

Core Course Requirements

The following core courses are required for the Engineering Science Major in Electronics Engineering and cannot be substituted for "equivalent" courses in other areas without prior approval by the School. 'Equivalent' courses taken without prior approval will not be applied to graduation requirements. Students should consult an academic advisor within their program for details on obtaining permission.

CHEM 121 - General Chemistry and Laboratory I (4)

Atomic and molecular structure; chemical bonding; thermochemistry; elements; periodic table; gases liquids, solids, and solutions. This course includes a laboratory component. Prerequisite: Chemistry 12, or CHEM 109 or 111 with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for CHEM 120 or 123 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jeffrey Warren
Steven Holdcroft
Mo, We, Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
D101
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 6125, Burnaby
D102
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2522, Burnaby
D103
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 5120, Burnaby
D104
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 3255, Burnaby
D105
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 2522, Burnaby
D106
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
EDB 9651, Burnaby
D107
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 5120, Burnaby
D108
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SECB 1012, Burnaby
D109
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 5120, Burnaby
D110
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2522, Burnaby
D111
Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
EDB 9651, Burnaby
D112
Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 5120, Burnaby
D113
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
WMC 2522, Burnaby
D114
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 5120, Burnaby
D115
Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 2507, Burnaby
D116
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 3535, Burnaby
D117
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
EDB 9651, Burnaby
D200 Jeffrey Warren
Steven Holdcroft
Mo, We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
D201
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2522, Burnaby
D202
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2503, Burnaby
D203
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
EDB 9651, Burnaby
D204
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 5120, Burnaby
D205
Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 5120, Burnaby
D206
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 2104, Burnaby
D300 Garry Mund
Mo, We, Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SUR 2600, Surrey
D301
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SUR 2750, Surrey
D302
Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 2980, Surrey
D303
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 2750, Surrey
D304
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SUR 2980, Surrey
D305
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SUR 2980, Surrey
D306
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SUR 2750, Surrey
D307
Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 2750, Surrey
D400 Garry Mund
Mo, We, Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SUR 2600, Surrey
D401
Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SUR 2980, Surrey
LA03
Tu 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LA04 Julie Lunniss
We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LA05
Th 8:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LA06 Julie Lunniss
Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LB03
Tu 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LB04 Julie Lunniss
We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LB05
Th 8:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LB06
Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LB13 Julie Lunniss
Tu 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LB14 Julie Lunniss
We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LB15 Julie Lunniss
Th 8:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LB16 Julie Lunniss
Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LC01
Tu 8:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 2780, Surrey
LC02
Tu 8:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 2780, Surrey
LC03
Tu 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SUR 2780, Surrey
LC04
Tu 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SUR 2780, Surrey
LC05 Garry Mund
We 10:00 AM – 1:50 PM
SUR 2780, Surrey
LE01
TBD
LE02
TBD
LE03
TBD
CMPT 128 - Introduction to Computing Science and Programming for Engineers (3)

An introduction to computing science and computer programming, suitable for students wishing to major in Engineering Science or a related program. This course introduces basic computing science concepts, and fundamentals of object oriented programming. Topics include: fundamental algorithms and problem solving; abstract data types and elementary data structures; basic object-oriented programming and software design; elements of empirical and theoretical algorithmics; computation and computability; specification and program correctness; and history of computing science. The course will use a programming language commonly used in Engineering Science. Prerequisite: BC Math 12 (or equivalent, or any of MATH 100, 150, 151, 154, or 157). Students with credit for CMPT 102, 120, 130 or 166 may not take this course for further credit. Students who have taken CMPT 125, 129, 135, or CMPT 200 or higher first may not then take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ghassan Hamarneh
Mo, Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 3182, Burnaby
SWH 10081, Burnaby
D101 Ghassan Hamarneh
Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D102 Ghassan Hamarneh
Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D103 Ghassan Hamarneh
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D104 Ghassan Hamarneh
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D105 Ghassan Hamarneh
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D106 Ghassan Hamarneh
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D107 Ghassan Hamarneh
Th 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D108 Ghassan Hamarneh
Th 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
ECON 103 - Principles of Microeconomics (4)

The principal elements of theory concerning utility and value, price and costs, factor analysis, productivity, labor organization, competition and monopoly, and the theory of the firm. Students with credit for ECON 200 cannot take ECON 103 for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Soc.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Douglas Allen
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
D101
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
WMC 3533, Burnaby
D102
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
WMC 3253, Burnaby
D103
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2523, Burnaby
D104
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2533, Burnaby
D105
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
D106
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D107
Tu 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
WMC 2533, Burnaby
D108
Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 3531, Burnaby
D109
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 2533, Burnaby
D110
We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
WMC 3531, Burnaby
D111
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 3531, Burnaby
D112
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5009, Burnaby
D113
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 3515, Burnaby
D114
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2531, Burnaby
D115
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 3535, Burnaby
D117
We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D200 Marie Rekkas
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Th 9:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
D201
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 3513, Burnaby
D202
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2531, Burnaby
D203
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D204
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
D205
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 2531, Burnaby
D206
We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
WMC 3515, Burnaby
D207
We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 3531, Burnaby
D208
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 3515, Burnaby
D209
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
WMC 3251, Burnaby
D210
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 3251, Burnaby
D211
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2503, Burnaby
D212
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2200, Burnaby
D213
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
WMC 2533, Burnaby
D214
We 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
WMC 2501, Burnaby
D215
Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
WMC 3531, Burnaby
D216
Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
WMC 3517, Burnaby
D217
We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
WMC 3513, Burnaby
D218
We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 3513, Burnaby
D900 Kristin Dust
We, Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 5280, Surrey
ENSC 100W - Engineering, Science and Society (3)

We study the history of engineering, its changing relationship to the sciences, and its effects upon society. We cover the ethical and environmental implications of engineering choices. We briefly explore the fundamental concepts in artificial intelligence, information theory, and thermodynamics. Students in the course will work together in small teams to complete a practical engineering design project. Corequisite: ENSC 105W. Students with credit for ENSC 100, CMPT 106, ENSC 106, or MSE 102 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Hum/Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Michael Hegedus
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
EDB 7618, Burnaby
EDB 7618, Burnaby
LA01 Michael Hegedus
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7102, Burnaby
LA02 Michael Hegedus
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
LA03 Michael Hegedus
Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
LA04 Michael Hegedus
Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 2530, Burnaby
LA05 Michael Hegedus
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5007, Burnaby
LA06 Michael Hegedus
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 6122, Burnaby
LA07 Michael Hegedus
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2530, Burnaby
LA08 Michael Hegedus
We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
LA09 Michael Hegedus
We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5046, Burnaby
LA10 Michael Hegedus
We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 2530, Burnaby
LA11 Michael Hegedus
Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
LA12 Michael Hegedus
Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
WMC 2530, Burnaby
LA13 Michael Hegedus
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
LA14 Michael Hegedus
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 2530, Burnaby
LA15 Michael Hegedus
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
TASC2 7201, Burnaby
LA16 Michael Hegedus
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2530, Burnaby
LA17 Michael Hegedus
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
TASC2 7201, Burnaby
LA18 Michael Hegedus
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
WMC 2530, Burnaby
LA19 Michael Hegedus
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
TASC2 7201, Burnaby
LA20 Michael Hegedus
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2530, Burnaby
LA21 Michael Hegedus
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 2530, Burnaby
LA22 Michael Hegedus
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 2530, Burnaby
LA23 Michael Hegedus
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5046, Burnaby
LA24 Michael Hegedus
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
TASC2 7201, Burnaby
LA25 Michael Hegedus
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
LA26 Michael Hegedus
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
TASC2 7201, Burnaby
ENSC 105W - Process, Form, and Convention in Professional Genres (3)

The course teaches fundamentals of informative and persuasive communication for professional engineers and computer scientists in order to assist students in thinking critically about various contemporary technical, social, and ethical issues. It focuses on communicating technical information clearly and concisely, managing issues of persuasion when communicating with diverse audiences, presentation skills, and teamwork. Corequisite: CMPT 106, ENSC 100 or ENSC 106. Students with credit for CMPT 105W, ENSC 102, MSE 101W or SEE 101W may not take ENSC 105W for further credit. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Michael Sjoerdsma
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SSCC 9002, Burnaby
AQ 3182, Burnaby
EDB 7618, Burnaby
ENSC 120 - Introduction to Electronics Laboratory Instruments Operation and Measurement Techniques (2)

This introductory laboratory course will familiarize the students with operating electronics laboratory instrumentation such as linear power supply, digital multi-meter, function generator and oscilloscope. Students are expected to perform 6 lab experiments and submit a work-sheet for each lab session. A final examination will be conducted (individually) to test the proficiency. Laboratory and workplace safety lectures and examinations are covered in this course. Prerequisite: BC Pre-Calculus 12 and BC Physics 12 (or equivalents).

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Atousa Hajshirmohammadi
Th 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SWH 10081, Burnaby
E101
TBD
LA02 Atousa Hajshirmohammadi
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
ASB 9800A, Burnaby
LA03 Atousa Hajshirmohammadi
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
ASB 9800A, Burnaby
LA06 Atousa Hajshirmohammadi
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
ASB 9800A, Burnaby
LA07 Atousa Hajshirmohammadi
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
ASB 9800A, Burnaby
LA08 Atousa Hajshirmohammadi
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
ASB 9800A, Burnaby
LA09 Atousa Hajshirmohammadi
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
ASB 9800A, Burnaby
ENSC 180 - Introduction to Engineering Analysis (3)

Introduction to MATLAB and its use in engineering. Implementation, verification, and analysis of various engineering algorithms used in signal and image processing, robotics, communications engineering. Prerequisite: (CMPT 128, CMPT 120, or CMPT 130)and (MATH 151 or MATH 150). Corequisite: MATH 152 and MATH 232.

ENSC 204 - Graphical Communication for Engineering (1)

An introduction to the use of graphical communication in engineering. Objectives are to improve the students' literacy in the use of graphics to communicate engineering information, and their ability to visualize and to think in three dimensions. Specific application areas discussed include 2D and 3D geometry in mechanical drawing, electronics-related drawings, block diagrams, and flow charts. The use of CAD tools will be discussed, and demonstrations of some tools will be provided. Students who have taken ENSC 104, MSE 100 or SEE 100 first may not then take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Balbir Gill
We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SWH 10081, Burnaby
ENSC 220 - Electric Circuits I (4)

Fundamental electrical circuit quantities, and circuit elements; circuits laws such as Ohm law, Kirchoff's voltage and current laws, along with series and parallel circuits; operational amplifiers; network theorems; nodal and mesh methods; analysis of natural and step response of first (RC and RL), as well as second order (RLC) circuits; real, reactive and rms power concepts. In addition, the course will discuss the worker safety implications of both electricity and common laboratory practices such as soldering. Prerequisite: (PHYS 121 or PHYS 126 or PHYS 141), ENSC 120, MATH 232 and MATH 310. MATH 232 and/or MATH 310 may be taken concurrently. Students with credit for MSE 250 or SEE 230 cannot take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ash Parameswaran
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 3149, Burnaby
AQ 3150, Burnaby
D101 Ash Parameswaran
TBD
LA01 Ash Parameswaran
Mo 4:30 PM – 6:50 PM
ASB 9800A, Burnaby
LA02 Ash Parameswaran
Th 2:30 PM – 4:50 PM
ASB 9800A, Burnaby
LA03 Ash Parameswaran
Fr 9:30 AM – 11:50 AM
ASB 9800A, Burnaby
ENSC 225 - Microelectronics I (4)

This course teaches analog/digital electronics and basic device physics in the context of modern silicon integrated circuits technology. Topics include: qualitative device physics and terminal characteristics; implementations and models of basic semiconductor devices (diodes, BJTs and MOSFETs); circuit simulation via SPICE; basic diode circuits; transistors as amplifiers and switching elements; temperature effects and compensation; single-stage transistor amplifiers; biasing, current sources and mirrors. Prerequisite: (ENSC 220 or MSE 250), MATH 232, and MATH 310. Students taking or with credit for ENSC 226, MSE 251 or SEE 231 may not take ENSC 225 for further credit. Quantitative.

ENSC 251 - Software Design and Analysis for Engineers (4)

Fundamentals for designing and implementing modular programs using a modern object-oriented programming language with a focus on understanding the performance implications of design choices on non-traditional computing platforms. Lecture topics include: classes; objects; debugging, testing & verification; design analysis & abstraction; error handling; fundamental data structures such as lists, trees, and graphs; and big-0 complexity analysis.computing platforms. Lecture topics include: classes; objects; debugging, testing & verification ; design analysis & abstraction ; error handling; fundamental data structures such as lists, trees, and graphs; and big-0 complexity analysis. Prerequisite: CMPT 128 or CMPT 135 or (CMPT 125 and CMPT 127).

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Zhenman Fang
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 3154, Burnaby
AQ 3154, Burnaby
D101 Zhenman Fang
TBD
LA01 Zhenman Fang
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:50 PM
ASB 10802, Burnaby
LA03 Zhenman Fang
Th 2:30 PM – 4:50 PM
ASB 10802, Burnaby
LA04 Zhenman Fang
Fr 9:30 AM – 11:50 AM
ASB 10802, Burnaby
ENSC 252 - Fundamentals of Digital Logic & Design (4)

Design of digital systems. In particular, students will learn basic digital design concepts including the implementation of synthesizable combinational and sequential logic using HDL and computer based design tools to implement their designs on a FPGA. Prerequisite: CMPT 128 or CMPT 125 or CMPT 126 or CMPT 135. ENSC 252 is a required course for all Engineering Science Majors and Honours Students (no course substitutions are permitted). Students with credit for ENSC/CMPT 150 or ENSC 329/MSE 350 cannot take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Anita Tino
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 3181, Burnaby
WMC 3260, Burnaby
D101 Anita Tino
TBD
LA01 Anita Tino
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:50 PM
ASB 10810, Burnaby
LA03 Anita Tino
Fr 9:30 AM – 11:50 AM
ASB 10810, Burnaby
LA04 Anita Tino
Fr 1:30 PM – 3:50 PM
ASB 10810, Burnaby
ENSC 254 - Introduction to Computer Organization (4)

Fundamentals of microprocessor architecture and operation; this includes instruction formats, assembly language programming (procedures and parameter passing, interrupts, etc), and memory and 1/0 port interfaces. Prerequisite: (ENSC 251 & ENSC 252) or (CMPT 150 & CMPT 225 & enrolled as a Computing Science Major). ENSC 254 is a required course for all Engineering Science Majors and Honours students (no course substitutions are permitted). Students with credit for, or who are concurrently enrolled in ENSC/CMPT 250 or ENSC 329/MSE 350 cannot take this course for further credit.

ENSC 280 - Engineering Measurement and Data Analysis (4)

Methods to collect and analyze engineering data. Topics include: engineering data representation, discrete and continuous probability density functions, engineering measurements, error analysis, test of hypotheses, linear and nonlinear regression, and design of experiments. This course includes a significant laboratory component comprising: laboratory measurements and statistical analysis of electronic circuits, introduction to electronic device behaviour, instrument noise. Prerequisite: ((PHYS 121 and ENSC 120) or PHYS 141) and (MATH 251 and MATH 232). MATH 251 and/or MATH 232 may be taken concurrently with ENSC 280. Engineering Science Majors and Honours students are requires to take ENSC 280 (no course substitutions will be accepted). Students with credit for STAT 270, MSE 210, SEE 241 or PHYS 231 cannot take this course for further credit.

ENSC 316 - Engineering Electromagnetics I (3)

Basic vector calculus concepts required for the course and introduction to waves. Differential forms of Maxwell equations. Capacitors in circuits; capacitance and field energy. Inductors in circuits and inductance; electrical current, electromotive force, electrical resistance. Design considerations for engineering applications in devices through simulations (course project). Prerequisite: MATH 251 and (ENSC 220 or MSE 250).

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Bernhard Rabus
Mo, We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 9660, Burnaby
D101 Bernhard Rabus
TBD
ENSC 320 - Electric Circuits II (4)

Topics covered include: use of Laplace transform in circuit analysis, including poles and zeros, frequency response and impulse response: convolution as a method for computing circuit responses: resonant and bandpass circuits; magnetically coupled circuits; two port circuits; and filtering. Also includes a laboratory component dealing with the design and implementation of active filters. Prerequisite: (ENSC 220 or MSE 250), MATH 232, and MATH 310.

ENSC 324 - Electronic Devices (3)

The essential physics of silicon semiconductor devices that form the heart of integrated circuits today are covered. An introduction to semiconductor device physics upon which device models are based leading to the development of the drift-diffusion equations. The static and dynamic behavior of PN junction diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and field effect transistors will be covered along with the application of the developed device models to integrated circuit design. Prerequisite: (ENSC 220 or MSE 250), MATH 232, and MATH 310. Students with credit for ENSC 224 or PHYS 365 may not take ENSC 324 for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ash Parameswaran
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCK 9500, Burnaby
SSCK 9500, Burnaby
D101 Ash Parameswaran
TBD
LA01 Ash Parameswaran
TBD
ENSC 325 - Microelectronics II (4)

This course introduces Students to analog integrated circuit design in the context of modern silicon integrated circuits technology. Topics included: integrated circuit technology and design tools; integrated component characteristics and limitations, differential amplifiers; multi stage amplifiers; feedback amplifiers; stability and frequency compensation; integrated operational amplifiers; bipolar and MOS digital circuits; analog aspects of digital electronics. Prerequisite: ENSC 225 or ENSC 226 or MSE 251.

ENSC 327 - Communication Systems (4)

This course represents and introduction to analog and digital communications systems. The main topics are: a review of Fourier Transform; the representation of bandpass signals; random signals in communications, including stationarity, ergodicity, correlation, power spectra and noise; amplitude and frequency modulation; circuits and techniques for modulation and demodulation; frequency division multiplexing; baseband digital communication; time division and multiplexing; an introduction to basic digital modulation schemes such as BPSK, FSK and QPSK. Laboratory work is included in this course. Prerequisite: (ENSC 380 or MSE 280) and ENSC 280. Students who completed STAT 270 prior to Spring 2015 may use STAT 270 instead of ENSC 280.

ENSC 350 - Digital Systems Design (4)

Presents advanced topics in digital design such as advanced state machine concepts, asynchronous design, hardware description languages, bus interfacing and DSP architecture. It also covers both the architecture and programming or field programmable logic devices. Some laboratory work is expected. Prerequisite: (ENSC 215 and either ENSC 250 or CMPT 250) or (ENSC 252 and ENSC 254).

ENSC 351 - Embedded and Real Time System Software (4)

Concentrates on the problems encountered when attempting to use computers in real time (RT) and embedded applications where the computer system must discern the state of the real world and react to it within stringent response time constraints. Both design methodology and practical implementation techniques for RT systems are presented. Although some hardware will be involved, it should be noted that this course concentrates on real time software. Prerequisite: (CMPT 128 and ENSC 215 and ENSC 250) or ENSC 254 or (CMPT 225 and (CMPT 250 or CMPT 295)) and a minimum of 60 credit hours/units. ENSC 351 is a required course for all Engineering Science Major and Honours students (no course substitutions are permitted). Students with credit for or who are concurrently enrolled in ENSC 451/MSE 450 cannot take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Craig Scratchley
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SWH 10081, Burnaby
AQ 3182, Burnaby
D101 Karol Swietlicki
TBD
LA01 Craig Scratchley
Tu 4:30 PM – 8:20 PM
ASB 8800, Burnaby
LA02 Craig Scratchley
We 4:30 PM – 8:20 PM
ASB 8800, Burnaby
LA03 Craig Scratchley
Th 4:30 PM – 8:20 PM
ASB 8800, Burnaby
LA04 Craig Scratchley
Fr 11:30 AM – 3:20 PM
ASB 8800, Burnaby
ENSC 380 - Linear Systems (3)

The objectives of this course are to cover the modelling and analysis of continuous and discrete signals using linear techniques. Topics covered include: a review of Laplace transforms; methods for the basic modelling of physical systems; discrete and continuous convolution; impulse and step response; transfer functions and filtering; the continuous Fourier transform and its relationship to the Laplace transform; frequency response and Bode plots; sampling; the Z-transform. Prerequisite: ENSC 180, ENSC 220 (or MSE 250) and MATH 310. Students with credit for MSE 280 or SEE 341 may not take ENSC 380 for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ivan Bajic
Tu, Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 3181, Burnaby
D101 Ivan Bajic
TBD
ENSC 383 - Feedback Control Systems (4)

This course is an introduction to the analysis, design, and applications of continuous time linear control systems. Topics include transfer function representation of open and closed loop systems, time domain specifications and steady state error, sensitivity analysis, time and frequency response, and stability criteria. It includes a treatment of methods for the analysis of control systems based on the root locus, Bode plots and Nyquist criterion, and their use in the design of PID, and lead-lag compensation. Lab work is included in this course. Prerequisite: ENSC 380 (or MSE 280). Students with credit for MSE 381 or SEE 342 may not take ENSC 383 for further credit.

ENSC 405W - Capstone A: Project Design, Management, and Documentation (3)

This is the first course in a group-based, two-course capstone sequence: ENSC 405W, ENSC 440. Topics include group writing processes, project documentation and engineering design, group dynamics, engineering standards, project management, dispute resolution, intellectual property, entrepreneurship, and user interface design. These groups will be maintained for the completion of the capstone project in ENSC 440. Students must take ENSC 440 in the term directly following successful completion of ENSC 405W. Grades awarded in ENSC 405W are conditional on the successful completion of ENSC 440 in the subsequent term. Prerequisite: (ENSC 105W or MSE 101W), ENSC 204, completion of a minimum of 22 units of upper division ENSC courses, and completion of (or concurrent enrollment in) two upper division technical electives meeting the requirements of the program. Students are required to complete all co-op requirements before enrolling in ENSC 440 Capstone B. Capstone B must be taken in the term immediately following Capstone A. Enrollment into Capstone A is by approval of the department via Capstone application form. Engineering Science students cannot take MSE 410, MSE 411, SEE 410W or SEE 411 for credit. Students who have taken (ENSC 304 and ENSC 305W) may not take ENSC 405W for credit. Writing.

ENSC 406 - Engineering Ethics, Law, and Professional Practice (2)

This course provides an introduction to the engineering profession, professional practice, engineering law and ethics, including the issues of worker and public safety. It also offers opportunities to explore the social implications and environmental impacts of technologies, including sustainability, and to consider engineers' responsibility to society. Prerequisite: 100 units including one of ENSC 100, ENSC 106, or CMPT 106, or MSE 102. Students with credit for MSE 402 or SEE 402 may not take ENSC 406 for further credit.

ENSC 410 - The Business of Engineering (3)

This course covers the business, management and entrepreneurial concepts that are important to engineers who manage projects, run businesses, or need to decide on the most efficient method for accomplishing a task. The topics to be covered include: financial accounting, rates of return, taxes, cost-benefit analyses, marketing, financing methods, and business plans. Prerequisite: A minimum of 80 units is required to enroll in this course. Students with credit for ENSC 201, ENSC 411, MSE 300 or SEE 300 cannot complete this course for further credit.

or ENSC 411 - The Business of Entrepreneurial Engineering (4)

This course combines the engineering economics covered in ENSC 201 with a series of guest lectures on entrepreneurship and the writing of a business plan in collaboration with students from the Beedie School of Business. Prerequisite: Students must have completed 90 units and have a GPA above 3.0. Students with credit for ENSC 201, ENSC 410 or MSE 300 cannot complete this course for further credit.

ENSC 416 - Engineering Electromagnetics II: Design (4)

Introduction to boundary value problems, intermediate description of waves. Differential and integral forms of Maxwell equations. Transmission lines, co-axial cables, optical waveguides: antennas, Smith charts. Design of impedance matching networks and filter synthesis. Reflection and transmission in complex networks. Cross-talk and interference in circuits. Prerequisite: ENSC 316 with a grade of at least C+.

ENSC 425 - Electronic System Design (4)

The principles and processes involved in designing analog circuits, emphasizing the functional blocks that comprise subsystems of a larger analog signal processing system. Topics include linear and nonlinear amplifiers, active filters, signal generators, signal modulators, switchmode power converters and analog/digital data conversion. The effects of non-ideal aspects of IC operational amplifiers on system performance are discussed and verified using laboratory projects. Students should be familiar with the behaviour and application of discrete semiconductor devices. Prerequisite: ENSC 320, ENSC 325, (ENSC 380 or MSE 280), and a minimum of 80 units.

ENSC 426 - High Frequency Electronics (4)

Transmission lines and waveguides, microwave devices, travelling wave devices. An introduction to the theory of radiation, antennae and wave propagation, and microwave scattering theory. The design of complete communication systems incorporating microwave, optical and satellite channels. Laboratory work is included in this course.Physics students with credit for PHYS 326 and PHYS 421 may take this course with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: Completion of 80 units including (ENSC 416 or PHYS 421) and ENSC 325.

ENSC 427 - Communication Networks (4)

Quantitative performance analysis and design of data and integrated services networks. Re-transmission error recovery schemes, networks of queues, congestion control, routing strategies. Multiple access techniques in data networks, design for specified throughput and delay performance. Wireless networks, routing approaches in mobile networks. Analysis and design of broadband integrated services digital networks, asynchronous time division multiplexing. Laboratory work is included in this course. Prerequisite: ENSC 327. A minimum of 80 units required. Engineering students may not take CMPT 371 as a substitute for ENSC 427.

or ENSC 428 - Digital Communications (4)

This course will cover the physical-layer design issues in digital communication systems. The major topics covered are: information measures and the notion of channel capacity; link budgets; digital modulation techniques, including the signal space concept and optimal detectors, error performance in noise, suboptimal detectors, pulse shaping, synchronization, and equalization; error control techniques such as block and conventional codes, as well as comparisons between FEC and ARQ. Laboratory work is included in this course. Prerequisite: ENSC 327 and a minimum of 80 units.

ENSC 440 - Capstone B: Engineering Design Project (3)

This is the second course in the group-based, two-course capstone sequence: ENSC 405W (Capstone A), and ENSC 440 (Capstone B). The capstone design course is based around a group project that consists of researching, designing, building and testing the hardware implementation of a working system. The course also includes material on how to design for safety and a shop training workshop. In order to obtain credit, students must successfully complete both courses. Students may not take Capstone B and Co-op in the same term. Prerequisite: ENSC 405W. Students will be automatically enrolled in ENSC 440 in the term immediately following successful completion of ENSC 405W. Students with credit for ENSC 440W, ENSC 442 or MSE 411 or SEE 411 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Andrew Rawicz
Fr 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5005, Burnaby
MATH 151 - Calculus I (3) *

Designed for students specializing in mathematics, physics, chemistry, computing science and engineering. Logarithmic and exponential functions, trigonometric functions, inverse functions. Limits, continuity, and derivatives. Techniques of differentiation, including logarithmic and implicit differentiation. The Mean Value Theorem. Applications of differentiation including extrema, curve sketching, Newton's method. Introduction to modeling with differential equations. Polar coordinates, parametric curves. Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least A, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least B, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 150, 154 or 157 may not take MATH 151 for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sophie Burrill
Mo, We, Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
D200 Veselin Jungic
Mo, We, Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
D300 Natalia Kouzniak
Mo, We, Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SRYE 1002, Surrey
OP01
TBD
MATH 152 - Calculus II (3)

Riemann sum, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, definite, indefinite and improper integrals, approximate integration, integration techniques, applications of integration. First-order separable differential equations and growth models. Sequences and series, series tests, power series, convergence and applications of power series. Prerequisite: MATH 150 or 151; or MATH 154 or 157 with a grade of at least B. Students with credit for MATH 155 or 158 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Michael Monagan
Mo, We, Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
OP01
TBD
MATH 232 - Applied Linear Algebra (3)

Linear equations, matrices, determinants. Introduction to vector spaces and linear transformations and bases. Complex numbers. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors; diagonalization. Inner products and orthogonality; least squares problems. An emphasis on applications involving matrix and vector calculations. Prerequisite: MATH 150 or 151; or MACM 101; or MATH 154 or 157, both with a grade of at least B. Students with credit for MATH 240 make not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Luis Goddyn
Mo, We, Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
D200 Justin Chan
Mo, We, Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 3170, Surrey
OP01
TBD
OP02
TBD
MATH 251 - Calculus III (3)

Rectangular, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Vectors, lines, planes, cylinders, quadric surfaces. Vector functions, curves, motion in space. Differential and integral calculus of several variables. Vector fields, line integrals, fundamental theorem for line integrals, Green's theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 152; or MATH 155 or MATH 158 with a grade of at least B. Recommended: It is recommended that MATH 240 or 232 be taken before or concurrently with MATH 251. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Weiran Sun
Mo, We, Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
WMC 3520, Burnaby
D200 Mahsa Faizrahnemoon
Mo, We, Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SRYE 3016, Surrey
D300 Jamie Mulholland
Mo, We, Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
WMC 2830, Burnaby
OP01
TBD
OP02
TBD
OP03
TBD
MATH 254 - Vector and Complex Analysis for Applied Sciences (3)

Designed for students in the Engineering Science program. Combines a continuation of the study of vector calculus from MATH 251 with an introduction to functions of a complex variable. Vector functions of a single variable, space curves, scalar and vector fields, conservative fields, surface and volume integrals, and theorems of Gauss, Green and Stokes. Functions of a complex variable, differentiability, contour integrals, Cauchy's theorem. Taylor and Laurent expansion, method of residues, integral transform and conformal mapping. Prerequisite: MATH 240 or 232; and 251. MATH 240 or 232 may be taken concurrently. Students with credit for MATH 322 or MATH 252 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

MATH 310 - Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations (3)

First-order differential equations, second- and higher-order linear equations, series solutions, introduction to Laplace transform, systems and numerical methods, applications in the physical, biological and social sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 152; or MATH 155/158 with a grade of at least B, MATH 232 or 240. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sessional
Mo, We, Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SRYE 2016, Surrey
D101
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYE 4016, Surrey
D102
We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SRYE 4016, Surrey
D103
We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SRYE 4016, Surrey
E100 Brenda Davison
Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
We 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 3182, Burnaby
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
E101
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 2830, Burnaby
E102
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
WMC 2830, Burnaby
E103
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2830, Burnaby
E104
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 2830, Burnaby
E105
Tu 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
WMC 2830, Burnaby
E106
Mo 6:00 PM – 6:50 PM
WMC 2830, Burnaby
PHYS 120 - Mechanics and Modern Physics (3)

A general calculus-based introduction to mechanics. Topics include translational and rotational motion, momentum, energy, gravitation, and selected topics in modern physics. Prerequisite: BC Principles of Physics 12 or PHYS 100 or equivalent, with a minimum grade of C-. This prerequisite may be waived, at the discretion of the department, as determined by the student's performance on a regularly scheduled PHYS 100 final exam. Please consult the physics advisor for further details. Corequisite: MATH 150 or 151 or 154 must precede or be taken concurrently. Students with credit for PHYS 101, 125 or 140 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Erol Girt
Mo, We, Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
D101
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D102
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5005, Burnaby
D103
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2507, Burnaby
D104
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 3515, Burnaby
D106
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5005, Burnaby
D107
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D108
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 7105, Burnaby
D110
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 3513, Burnaby
D113
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D114
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 5100, Burnaby
D115
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 5100, Burnaby
D116
Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
WMC 3533, Burnaby
D119
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
BLU 11911, Burnaby
PHYS 121 - Optics, Electricity and Magnetism (3)

A general calculus-based introduction to electricity, magnetism and optics. Topics include electricity, magnetism, simple circuits, optics and topics from applied physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 120 or 125 or 140 (or PHYS 101 with a grade of A or B). Corequisite: MATH 152 or 155 must precede or be taken concurrently. Students with credit for PHYS 102, 126 or 141 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

* or Math 150-Calculus I with Review(4) if you do not meet the MATH 151 prerequisites

Complementary Studies Elective Courses

For students in the Electronics Engineering option, the university has agreed to reduce the total credits required in B-Soc and B-Hum courses to 9 (or 3 courses), with at least one course (3 credits) in each category. Since ECON 103-4 is a B-Soc course, for these students at least one complementary elective should be from the B-Hum category and at least one should be from the Central Issue, Methodology, and Thought Process category as required by CEAB. Please note that the same course can satisfy both of these requirements and the other complementary elective course can be any other course from either of the two categories listed below. A list of complementary studies electives can be found at http://www.sfu.ca/engineering/current-students/undergraduate-students/requirements-and-policies/electives.html. Other courses may be acceptable with undergraduate curriculum committee chair approval.

Engineering Science & Design Elective Courses

Engineering Science and Design (ESD) Electives may be offered by departments other than the School of Engineering Science, but they must satisfy the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB) engineering science and engineering design requirements. Generally, Engineering Science has roots in mathematics and basic sciences, but carries knowledge further toward creative applications that could include simulation, experimental procedures, modelling and the development of mathematical or numerical techniques. Application to the identification and solution of practical engineering problems is stressed.

Engineering Design requires students to demonstrate an ability to design solutions for complex, open-ended engineering problems and to design systems, components or processes that meet specified needs with appropriate attention to health and safety risks, applicable standards, and economic, environmental, cultural and societal considerations.

Each option has a pre-approved list of electives that may include one or more pre-approved ESD electives. Note that these courses may have prerequisites not required for your option; these prerequisites would still need to be taken in order to enrol in the elective. Students interested in taking an ESD elective course that does not appear on this list should contact the Chair of their option/Undergraduate Curriculum Committee and obtain his/her approval in writing before proceeding with the course.

Students in the Electronics Option must complete a minimum of 12 units from the engineering science & design elective course list, only one of which can be at the 300 level. The remaining engineering science and design units can be fulfilled using courses as specified at http://www.sfu.ca/engineering/undergraduate_students/academic-programs/electronics/curriculum-revised.html.

NOTE: SFU students enrolled in the Accelerated Master's program within the School of Engineering Science may apply a maximum of 10 graduate course units, taken while completing the bachelor's degree, towards the upper division undergraduate electives of the bachelor's program and the requirements of the master's degree. For more information, please contact the Engineering Science Graduate Program Committee Chair.

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student’s major subject
Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth Must be outside the student’s major subject, and may be lower or upper division
6 units Social Sciences: B-Soc
6 units Humanities: B-Hum
6 units Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth 6 units outside the student’s major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements)

Students choosing to complete a joint major, joint honours, double major, two extended minors, an extended minor and a minor, or two minors may satisfy the breadth requirements (designated or not designated) with courses completed in either one or both program areas.

 

WQB Requirement Modifications for Engineering Science Students

For engineering science students, these university requirements are modified as follows.

  • for students in the electronics engineering option, the total number of Breadth-Social Sciences (B-Soc) and Breadth-Humanities (B-Hum) courses is reduced to three courses, with at least one course in each category

In addition, the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB) requires that one complementary studies elective in the ENSC curriculum must be in the Central Issue, Methodology, and Thought Process category.

Residency Requirements and Transfer Credit

  • At least half of the program's total units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.
  • At least two thirds of the program's total upper division units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.

Please see Faculty of Applied Sciences Residency Requirements for further information.

Elective Courses

In addition to the courses listed above, students should consult an academic advisor to plan the remaining required elective courses.