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Sociology and Anthropology Courses

SA 100W - Perspectives on Canadian Society (SA) (4)

An examination of Canadian society from the perspective of the social sciences -- an introduction both to the nature of Canadian society and to the use of sociological and anthropological concepts applied to the analysis of modern societies in general. This course is meant to appeal to those who specifically wish to expand their knowledge of Canadian Society, and also to those who may be considering further work in sociology and anthropology. Topics to be considered include class structure, the nature of Canada's population, regional variation, gender relations, multiculturalism, native issues. Writing/Breadth-Social Sci.

SA 101 - Introduction to Anthropology (A) (4)

Anthropology asks fundamental questions about how people live and interact in different contexts. Engages with contemporary social life around the world, including the relations among people, ideas, and things. Provides analytical tools to help understand the role of culture and society in our lives. Breadth-Social Sciences.

SA 150 - Introduction to Sociology (S) (4)

Explores how sociologists study, describe, and explain social life. Introduces the sociological perspective and applies it to fundamental social process and everyday issues. As we consider phenomena ranging from interactions among individuals to societal and global inequalities, students critically examine social issues to build their understanding of the world. Breadth-Social Sciences.

SA 201W - Anthropology and Contemporary Life (A) (4)

An introduction to the anthropological perspective as applied to the organization of everyday life in contemporary settings. Introduces positivist, interpretive, and critical interpretive approaches to the analysis of social actions, identities, and values as enacted in space and time. Students with credit for SA 291 may not take SA 201W for further credit. Recommended: SA 101. Writing. Prerequisite: . Equivalent Courses: SA201 SA291. Writing.

SA 203 - Violence in War and Peace (SA) (4)

A critical examination of the relationship between violence and structural inequalities. Focus will be on different forms that violence assumes in war and peace and how acts of violence are remembered, collectively denied or misrecognized. Particular case studies may include colonization of indigenous people, Holocaust, South African Apartheid, India's Partition, the genocide in Rwanda, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, 9/11 and its aftermath along with everyday suffering, including gender violence. As well, special attention will be given to anthropological witnessing. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 210 - The Return of the Folk Devils (S) (4)

Surveys the social and moral regulation of human subjects in both historical and contemporary contexts, examining how social groups, marginalized as outsiders - "folk devils"--are orgainized. Canvasses ideas, policies and methods that characterize how state and civil projects respond to these outsiders and aim to impose social order through systems of law, politics, education, health, welfare, labour, religion, family, media, and other key social institutions. Students will learn about the profound impact the spectre of "folk devils" have on civil and state regulation projects, and about the diversity of social ordering ideologies, policies and practices encompass. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 218 - Illness, Culture and Society (A) (4)

Health and well-being are social experiences. How do assumptions about the body, the self, and social relations operate in medical spheres? Introduces anthropological perspectives on illness and healing as a means of exploring the social existence of the body. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Students with credit for SA 460 when offered as Medical Anthropology may not take this course for further credit.

SA 231 - Sociology of Families (S) (4)

An examination of families and households in social, cultural, political and economic context. This course focuses on the diversity of family forms in contemporary societies (particularly Canada) in relation to various social institutions and processes, including demographic trends, ideology, gender inequality, the economy, the state and social policies. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 245 - Cultures and Images (A) (4)

This course introduces students to the principles and practices of visual anthropology through exploring the creation, circulation, and consumption of images among and between members of diverse cultures in the contemporary world. Topics to be covered include the use of photographs, film and video as a tool in ethnographic research; the use and implications of new information technologies; the 'reading' of photographs, film and video from an anthropological perspective; the emergence and development of non-Western visual media. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 250 - Introduction to Sociological Theory (S) (4)

An account of sociological theory, outlining the main ideas and concepts of the principal schools of thought. Prerequisite: SA 150.

SA 255 - Introduction to Social Research (SA) (4)

Explores how sociologists and anthropologists investigate social relations and contexts. Students learn to develop research questions and turn them into research projects. Introduces data collection techniques and related ethical issues, the relationship between theory and research, and other fundamental concepts and issues involved in conducting qualitative and quantitative research. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150. Quantitative.

SA 257 - Understanding Quantitative Research in Sociology and Anthropology (SA) (4)

Takes the mystery, but not the magic, out of quantitative research in anthropology and sociology by introducing analytical skills necessary for reading, understanding, and critiquing quantitative research. Students evaluate popular coverage of social research; learn concepts related to statistical significance; conduct basic statistical analysis, including designing graphs and tables. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150. Quantitative.

SA 260 - Individual and Society (S) (4)

An examination of how self and identity (e.g. race, class, gender, sexual orientation) are socially derived within contemporary western culture, and of the ways that individuals shape their social environment. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W .

SA 275 - China in Transition (SA) (4)

An introduction to culture, social structure and the processes of social, economic, and political transformation in contemporary China. Topics may include recent development of Marxism, feminism and neoliberalism in China; Western debates on China's rise and images of China as threat; human rights. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150. Students with credit for SA 293 in 2000-1 term may not take SA 275 for further credit.

SA 300 - Canadian Social Structure (S) (4)

An analysis of the social institutions and structure of Canadian society. The focus of the course will vary from semester to semester, but typically it will examine different theoretical approaches to the study of Canada and, from these, develop a framework for the analysis of Canadian social institutions and class structure. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 301 - Contemporary Ethnography (A) (4)

A consideration of key themes in contemporary anthropology. Addresses theoretical and methodological questions by examining the work of contemporary anthropologists conducting research in diverse locations around the world. Prerequisite: SA 201W.

SA 302W - Global Problems and the Culture of Capitalism (SA) (4)

An introduction to the political economy and culture of capitalism in relation to global problems. Case studies may focus on issues of population, famine, disease, poverty, environmental destruction, social inequality, and nation-state violence. Resistance, rebellion and social movements in response to these problems also will be addressed. Students who took SA 294 in 03-1, 04-1 and 04-2 may not take SA 302 for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Social Sci.

SA 304 - Social Control (S) (4)

This course examines how the organization of control (formal and informal) affects both individuals and society. It will investigate how control takes form, how it functions, the ideologies supporting it, and the resistance it produces. We will ask the following questions: who are the agents of social control; who or what do they control; and how do they control? Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 315 - New Information Technology and Society (SA) (4)

Explores the new social spaces and social practices fostered by new information technology. Special attention will be paid to who is making decisions about what technologies to adopt and how, what social changes are resulting, and who benefits and who loses. A significant portion of activity in this course will involve direct engagement with new information technology.

SA 316 - Tourism and Social Policy (S) (4)

An examination of tourism from the perspectives of sociology and anthropology, focusing primarily upon the social and cultural impacts of tourism and the social policy implications of tourism development in different societies. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201w.

SA 317 - Sociology of Art Forms (S) (4)

This course may focus variously on one or all of the following: the social origins and functions of art, sociological theories of aesthetics, and contemporary issues in art, such as the fate of art in modern society, popular culture, mass media, ideology in art. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Students with credit for SA 416 may not take this course for further credit.

SA 318 - Technologies of Health and Expectation (A) (4)

Investigates how medical technologies are altering ways we perceive our bodies, frame moral questions about health, and imagine human possibilities. Case studies from around the world are used to examine the social, ethical, and political dilemmas that surface when people interact with biomedical objects under different conditions. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 319 - Transnational Aging (A) (4)

Explores how mobility and migration across borders influence the lives of older people, with attention to how multigenerational transnational families mutually negotiate care and support. Political and socio-cultural factors will be examined through case studies from around the world in order to assess how we age in a transnational world. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 321 - Social Movements (S) (4)

A study of the sources, development and effects of social movements in transitional and modernized societies. Specific types of movements will be analysed. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 322 - Religion and Society (SA) (4)

An examination of the relations between religion and the social environment. Consideration will be given to classical theoretical debates in the anthropology and sociology of religion. Specific topics vary from year to year, and may include: religion in personhood and communities; religion, gender, ethnicity and social class; secularization and secularism; the role of religion in political mobilizations; interreligious relations; religious freedom and citizenship. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 323 - Symbol, Myth and Meaning (A) (4)

An examination of myth, symbolism, ritual and cosmological systems. Anthropological theories of magic, possession, witchcraft, healing and religious movements analyzed in ethnographic context. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 325 - Political Sociology (S) (4)

An examination of the relations of power and authority. This course will analyze the interrelations of family, church, class, interest groups, etc., particularly as they influence and are influenced by the state. The relations of law and ideology to the structures of government will form the context for this analysis. The course may also focus on broad theoretical questions of contemporary political interest. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 326 - Food, Ecology and Social Thought (S) (4)

Modernization narratives have placed food and agriculture on the margins of social thought. The current ecological crisis requires us to take a new look at the global agrifood system and its social, political and ecological relations. This course develops analytical perspectives on contemporary issues concerning food, ecology and agrarian change. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 327 - Sociology of Knowledge (S) (4)

An examination of sociological theories concerning the interaction of social structures, and meaning and belief systems. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 328 - States, Cultures and Global Transitions (SA) (4)

Offers a new perspective on global hegemonic transformations which take different forms in different historical periods, animated by powerful discourses of discipline, opportunity, development and sustainability. Helps students explore alternatives through the examples of multiple forms of sovereignty, global citizenship and democracy. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Students with credit for SA 430 or SA 463 completed in 2004-3 may not take this course for further credit.

SA 329 - Sex, Work, and International Capital (SA) (4)

Provides new insights into global gender regimes from a historical-comparative perspective of North-South relations. Stimulates a discussion on the meaning of development and women's work through a theoretical and thematic exploration of issues which may seem specifically based in the global South but are commonly shared throughout the world. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Students who took SA 463 in 2003, SA 460 in 2003, and SA 360 in 2004 may not take this course for further credit. Students with credit for SA 429 may not take this course for further credit.

SA 330 - Global Islam (SA) (4)

Explores the interplay between global Islamic politics and European modernity, including the neoliberal remaking of citizens, societies and states. Historical, comparative and global perspectives address the limitations of conventional approaches that situate Islam within dichotomous models of what is western and what is eastern, and modern versus non-modern. Prerequisite: SA 101 or SA 150 or SA 201W. Students who have taken SA 360, Special Topics in Sociology and Anthropology in Fall 2006 (1067) or Fall 2007 (1077), may not take SA 330 for further credit.

SA 331 - Politics of the Family (S) (4)

A sociological examination of the contested nature of contemporary domestic and intimate relations. The course will focus on debates arising from equality movement politics (e.g. gender, sexuality, race). Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 332 - The Anthropology of Childhood (A) (4)

A cross-cultural examination of the social and cultural relations that shape childhood in different settings. Topics to be considered could include: the social definition of childhood and child rearing; the institutional arrangements established for children and youth and the impact that these have on children, families, and society; the social construction of child and youth cultures. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 201W.

SA 335 - Gender Relations and Social Issues (S) (4)

Together we will think about how gender influences and suffuses social interaction, in both historical and contemporary contexts: consider how assumptions and expectations about gender shape identity, the things people do, and how they do them; and discuss gender inequality and equality across society. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Students with credit for GSWS 308 may not take SA 335 for further credit.

SA 337 - Sexuality and Society (S) (4)

The categories that organize our understandings of sex, gender and sexuality have powerful histories and roles in organizing social relations in western society. Social activists and academics contest the naturalness of these categories, particularly that of the binary opposition between male and female, and related assumptions about sexuality and sexual orientation. This course encompasses a range of perspectives on sex/gender identity, sexuality, and the relationship between the two. These perspectives include feminist, lesbian and gay, and queer and transgender challenges to traditional understandings of sex/gender identity and sexuality. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 340 - Social Issues and Social Policy Analysis (SA) (4)

How do environmental challenges, the contradictions of capitalism, and histories of violence shape contemporary life? How do social issues affect our identities, communities, and sense of belonging? Students learn how to wield sociological and anthropological concepts and theories through clear and analytical communication and writing. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 345 - Race, Immigration and the Canadian State (S) (4)

An introduction to critical perspectives on the social construction of race, nation building and transnational migration, with an emphasis on state policies and the experiences of immigrants. The course will cover a review of colonialism and the construction of racialized labour market. Core topics may include: racialization of space, anti-racist feminist thought, immigration policy, settlement services, multiculturalism, citizenship, racial profiling, diasporas, and refugees. Comparative material will be used to complement the Canadian focus. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 350 - Classical Sociological Thought (S) (4)

An examination of aspects of the work of one or more of the nineteenth or early twentieth century sociological theorists. Prerequisite: SA 250.

SA 351 - Classical Marxist Thought (S) (4)

A detailed study of classical Marxist social thought. Prerequisite: SA 250.

SA 352 - Games, Sports and Cultures (A) (4)

An anthropological examination of games and sports that explores their cultural, political and aesthetic dimensions. Applies cross-cultural perspectives to explore the shaping of identities through athletic practices as well as the impacts of globalization on snorting passions. Particular attention is focused upon the creation of sport ethnographies. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 201W.

SA 353 - Sociology of Sport (S) (4)

A sociological examination of sport focuses on the role of this important set of institutions and activities in shaping social relations and understandings about difference and identity. Sport has a long history of naturalizing racial and gender differences in such a way as to reinforce and reflect social inequality more broadly. Racial segregation in sport (at least in formal legal terms) is no longer considered acceptable in western societies or in the Olympic movement at the global level. But the power of sport in reinforcing and naturalizing racial inequality continues while the naturalness and inevitability of sex segregation in sport remains largely unchallenged. This course will explore the relationships between sport and social inequality, sport and nationalism, and sport and the economy. Prerequisite: Minimum of 30 units including SA 150. Students with credit for SA 216 or SA 315 (when offered as Society of Leisure) may not take this course for further credit.

SA 355 - Quantitative Methods (S) (4)

Examines the methods, concepts and statistical procedures central to quantitative sociological research. Emphasizing the meaningful application of statistical analysis to social issues, the course provides intermediate quantitative research skills. Students use statistics software to conduct applicable statistical analyses and interpret results. Prerequisite: SA 255 and SA 257. Students with credit for SA 355 may not take POL 315 for further credit. Quantitative.

SA 356W - Ethnography and Qualitative Methods (SA) (4)

An examination of qualitative field methods, including participant observation, interviewing, archival research, cross-cultural research, life histories, network analysis, mapping, and ethical problems of fieldwork. Prerequisite: SA 255. Writing.

SA 358 - The Philosophy of the Social Sciences (S) (4)

An analysis of the nature of explanation in the social sciences: 'mind' and action, positivist and interpretive modes of explanation, sociological and historical explanation, objectivity, forms of relativism, the concept of rationality. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 359 - Special Topics in Anthropology (A) (4)

Explores a topic in Anthropology not regularly offered by the department. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 360 - Special Topics in Sociology and Anthropology (SA) (4)

A seminar exploring a topic not regularly offered by the department. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 362 - Society and the Changing Global Division of Labour (S) (4)

An examination of the social and political implications of the global economy. Topics to be considered include the influence of neo-liberal economics, the decline of the national welfare state, transnational political agencies and public policy, the internationalization of culture, the global labour market, the 'world city' hypothesis, ethnic resurgence and alternatives to these developments. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 363 - Process of Development and Underdevelopment (S) (4)

An examination of sociological and anthropological theories of development and underdevelopment as applied to the Third World. The nature and consequences of world system linkages; colonialism and decolonization; patterns of social change in selected societies and regions. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 364 - Urban Communities and Cultures (SA) (4)

Anthropological approaches to urbanization, the nature of the city as a social system, and urban cultures and lifestyles. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Students with credit for SA 464 may not take SA 364 for further credit.

SA 365 - Selected Regional Areas (A) (4)

An examination of selected aspects of the social structure, culture and the processes of social change in varying regional areas. The focus will vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 366 - Special Topics in Sociology (S) (4)

Explores a topic in Sociology not regularly offered by the department. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 368 - Language, Ideology, and Power (A) (4)

Examines how language shapes and is shaped by culture, power, and social relations and introduces the major concepts, approaches, and theories used by anthropologists in the investigation of relations between language and cultural forms. Prerequisite: SA 101, 201W, or 150.

SA 371 - The Environment and Society (SA) (4)

An examination of environmental issues in their social context. Environmental issues are on the leading edge of contemporary public concern and public policy debates. This course will examine such issues as the relationship between social organization and mode of subsistence, the politics of hunger, and the way in which human societies in their particular social, historical, and cultural contexts view and interact with the natural world. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 375 - Labour and the Arts of Living (A) (4)

Introduces sociocultural approaches to labour by examining the relationship between work and life in different parts of the world. Students will be given opportunities to reflect on their own working lives and aspirations for future employment. Topics include precarity, informality, unemployment, wageless life, work and citizenship, and post-work politics. Prerequisite: SA 101 or SA 150 or SA 201W. Students who have taken SA 360 in Spring 2014 or Spring 2016 may not take this course for further credit.

SA 386 - The Ethnography of Politics (SA) (4)

An examination of the ways in which ethnographers seek to understand a world experiencing profound changes in the relationships between governments and the societies they govern. Topics to be considered may include: relations between indigenous peoples and governments; the social and cultural dynamics of public policy making; the articulation of human rights issues. The focus of the course will vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 388 - Comparative Studies of Minority Indigenous Peoples (A) (4)

In this intensive seminar, we compare political actions and social movements of indigenous peoples across several countries: analyze development of these movements over time; and discuss factors affecting the timing, reception, intensity and nature of these politics. Students write research papers on topics they develop. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 396 - Selected Regional Areas (SA) (4)

An examination of selected aspects of social structure, culture and processes of social change in a specific regional area. The focus will vary from term to term. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 402 - Turning Ideas into Action in the World (A) (4)

Examines ways we can bring our anthropological and sociological skills, knowledges, and imaginations to bear in the world outside the academy, particularly in the realms of work and activism. Uses a praxis-based approach, wherein students actively apply their knowledge to practical issues while also reflecting on the process of doing so. Prerequisite: Minimum of 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Recommended: At least two upper division courses in anthropology.

SA 410 - Sociology of Dangerous Classes (S) (4)

Offers specialized instruction on advanced topics pertaining to the social and moral regulation of human subjects in both historical and contemporary contexts. It explores the ideologies, policies and practices of regulation and governance in application to selected social contexts and subjects including, but not confined to, welfare, justice, medicine, the 'psy' sciences, immigration, labour, sexuality, pornography, racialization, gender and family. Students will acquire specialized knowledge about the profound impact of civil and state regulation projects on societies past and present, and about the rich diversity of institutional, cultural and human experience that these social ordering ideologies, policies and practices encompass. Prerequisite: Minimum of 72 units including either SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 418 - Global Health: Humanitarian Encounters (A) (4)

An investigation of the social, cultural, and political issues that contribute to problems of ill-health in resource-poor countries and the major efforts in international public health to address these problems. It explores the application of knowledge about social, and especially gender relations in international health, with particular attention to local perspectives and grassroots initiatives. Institutional frameworks intended to promote health development are examined in historical and contemporary perspective through case studies on topics such as: malaria, population control, maternal health, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis. Prerequisite: 72 units, which must include SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Breadth-Social Sciences.

SA 420 - Sociology of Aging (S) (4)

The structural and behavioral implications of aging. Topics included will be: demographic aspects of aging; the relationship of aging to political, economic, familial and other social institutions; the psychological significance of aging. Prerequisite: 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or SA 201W, or acceptance into the diploma program in gerontology, or by consent of instructor. This course is identical to GERO 420 and students cannot take both courses for credit. Students may use GERO 420 to fulfil their major or minor requirements in lieu of SA 420.

SA 421 - Commodities and Substances: Bodies, Consumption and Ingestion (A) (4)

Addresses current theoretical and methodological approaches to the anthropological study of consumption and ingestion of diverse substances. Topics include historical perspectives on production, distribution and consumption; power and meaning; inequality and governance of legal and illegal drugs, drug foods, medicines and diverse populations of consumers and ingesters. Prerequisite: Minimum of 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or 201W, or graduate student status in Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences or Faculty of Health Sciences. Students who have taken SA 460 may not take this course for further credit.

SA 450 - Advanced Sociological Theory (S) (4)

A senior seminar on current perspectives in sociological theory. Emphasis will differ from semester to semester. Prerequisite: Minimum of 72 units including SA 350, a GPA of at least 3.25 and consent of the instructor.

SA 451 - Issues in Anthropological Theory (A) (4)

A senior seminar on current perspectives in anthropological theory. Emphasis will differ from semester to semester. Prerequisite: Minimum of 72 units including SA 301, a GPA of at least 3.25 and consent of the instructor.

SA 459 - Special Topics in Anthropology (A) (4)

An advanced seminar devoted to an in-depth examination of a topic in Anthropology not regularly offered by the department. Prerequisite: Minimum 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 460 - Special Topics in Sociology and Anthropology I (SA) (4)

An advanced seminar devoted to an in-depth examination of a topic not regularly offered by the department. Prerequisite: Minimum 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 461 - Special Topics in Sociology (S) (4)

An advanced seminar devoted to an in-depth examination of a topic in Sociology not regularly offered by the department. Prerequisite: Minimum 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 472 - Anthropology and the Past (A) (4)

Anthropologists frequently turn to historical documents (traveller's reports, missionary archives, etc.) in order to reconstruct the nature of past societies; likewise, every society has a sense of its own past and represents it in its own way. This course examines the relation between history and anthropology. Content may include: the use of historical material in anthropological research; construction of traditional knowledge as a cultural process; history and the politics of culture; the relation between individual and collective memory. Prerequisite: Minimum of 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 474 - Cultures, Politics and Performances (A) (4)

From intimate dramas of everyday life to multi-media staging of political events, performances of various kinds infuse social/cultural/political relations among people(s), shape understandings of pasts, and evoke visions of futures. We explore contemporary work that engages questions generated by anthropologists, performance studies scholars, and artists. Prerequisite: Minimum 72 units including SA 101 or SA 201W.

SA 496 - Directed Readings in Anthropology (A) (4)

Directed readings in a selected field of study under the direction of a single faculty member. A paper will be required. Prerequisite: minimum of 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Students with credit for SA 497 may not take SA 496 for further credit.

SA 497 - Directed Readings in Sociology (S) (4)

Directed readings in a selected field of study under the direction of a single faculty member. A paper will be required. Prerequisite: minimum of 72 units including SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Students with credit for SA 496 may not take SA 497 for further credit.

SA 498 - Field Study in Sociology and/or Anthropology (SA) (8)

Advanced field project in a research setting. Admission dependent on availability of appropriate field placements and departmental supervisory capacity. Prerequisite: Students must successfully complete a Criminal Record Check.

SA 499 - Honours Essay (SA) (8)

An honours essay to be written under the direction of a member of faculty, a copy of which is to be permanently lodged with the department. Applications should be submitted to the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee 4 weeks prior to the beginning of the term in which SA 499 is to be undertaken. Students should submit a paper proposal, a work plan, and confirmation of faculty supervisor.

SA 815 - Theories of Latin American Development (4)

Asynthetic introduction to historical and contemporary theories of development in Latin America. Topics include political economy of development, sociological theories of development, an introduction to neoliberalsim, and the contemporary experience of globalization and development in Latin America. Students who have taken IS 815 or LAS 815 for credit may not take this course for further credit.

SA 835 - Social and Political Change in Latin America (4)

A general overview of social and political change in Latin America, including revolutions, independence, transition to democracy, and contemporary social movements. Theoretical approaches may include social-movement theory, democratic theory, etc. Students who have taken IS 835 or LAS 835 for credit may not take this course for further credit.

SA 840 - Graduate Seminar (2)

Orientation to university, professional development, and cohort building. Required course for the first year MA and PhD students in Sociology and Anthropology. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

SA 841 - Graduate Seminar II (1)

Presentations by faculty members, senior graduate students, and guest speakers. Required course for first year MA and PhD students in Sociology and Anthropology. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

SA 849 - Selected Topics in the History of Sociological Thought (5)

Examines the classical tradition of sociological thought, represented in the writings of a range of early leading theorists such as Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, Georg Simmel and/or George Herbert Mead. Will also include a review of the writings and influence of thinkers such as Montesquieu, Rousseau, Descartes, Spinoza, Bacon, Hobbes, and/or Locke. Required course for MA and PhD students in Sociology. Students from other departments and faculties may enrol with permission of instructor. Offered each fall term.

SA 850 - Selected Topics in Social Theory (5)

Examines different historical and contemporary perspectives from the body of social theory. Students from other departments and faculties may enroll with permission of instructor.

SA 853 - Readings in Sociology I (5)

SA 854 - Readings in Sociology II (5)

SA 856 - Qualitative Sociological Research Methods (5)

Examines approaches to qualitative methodology and research design in Sociology and Anthropology including epistemological and ethical debates surrounding the practice of qualitative methodology and research design in diverse contexts. Students will investigate research methods applicable to their graduate research projects. Students from other departments and faculties may enroll with permission of instructor.

SA 857 - Research Design Seminar (5)

Guides students through the process of designing a prospectus for MA or PhD thesis research. Required course for MA and PhD students in Sociology and Anthropology. Students from other departments and faculties may enrol with permission of instructor. Offered each summer term. Prerequisite: SA 856 or permission of instructor.

SA 870 - Theories in Anthropology (5)

Examines the dynamic relationship among conceptual aims, social relations in research, and the socio-political contexts of anthropological work through close study of selected classical and contemporary works in anthropology. Students from other departments and faculties may enrol with permission of instructor.

SA 871 - Readings in Anthropology I (5)

SA 872 - Readings in Anthropology II (5)

SA 875 - Ethnographic Methodology: Social/Cultural Anthropology (5)

In depth study of ethnographic methodology as practiced, theorized and debated by social and cultural anthropologists. Course will include anthropological analyses of multi- and interdisciplinary approaches to, and adaptations of, ethnographic methodology and methods. Elective course for MA and PhD students in Sociology and Anthropology. Students from other departments and faculties may enrol with permission of instructor. Course will be offered in response to student demand, dependent on availability of departmental resources.

SA 887 - Special Topics in Sociology/Anthropology (5)

An advanced seminar devoted to an in-depth examination of a topic not regularly offered by the department.

SA 897 - PhD Qualifying Examinations (6)

Course objective is to provide a framework and process for students and supervisors to work within to facilitate students' satisfactory preparation for qualifying examinations; and to complete qualifying examinations required for admission to doctoral candidate standing. Prerequisite: All PhD course requirements, with the exception of SA 857 must be completed before student may enrol in SA 897.

SA 898 - MA Thesis (10)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

SA 899 - PhD Thesis (10)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.