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Behavioural Neuroscience Major

Bachelor of Science

The Department of Psychology and the Department of Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology co-operate to offer this program leading to a Bachelor of Science in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences or the Faculty of Science.

A committee consisting of three members from each department (undergraduate program chairs, department advisors, and behavioural neuroscience co-chairs) and one student representative administers the program. The committee is co-chaired by a member of each department.

Admission Requirements

There is no direct admission from high school into this program. Students admitted from high school or transferring to Simon Fraser University from another post-secondary institution are normally admitted as intended Behavioural Neuroscience majors into the Faculty of Science or Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences.

Once at SFU, students apply for approval into the Behavioural Neuroscience major program through the internal transfer process as outlined below.

Approval is competitive. An approval average is established each term, depending on spaces available. Students must excel in the university science and psychology courses required for this major to meet the competitive approval average.

For students transferring from another post-secondary institution, transfer courses will count towards the total units required for the major, but grades in these courses will not be used towards the program approval GPA.

Students must complete a minimum of 5 required courses at SFU to form the basis of their program approval GPA for entry into the Behavioural Neuroscience major program.

Internal Transfer

  • Applicants will be approved based on a competitive grade point average (GPA) calculated over 5 or more required courses taken at SFU.
  • Students may apply as soon as they have completed the required SET 1 courses.
  • Students who are not admissible after completing SET 1 can reapply to the major program after they have completed 4 or more courses from SET 2.
  • All SET 1 and 2 courses completed at SFU will be included in the approval GPA.
  • A C- grade or better is required in all courses except for PSYC 201W where a minimum grade of C is required.

SET 1

Students complete both of

  • BPK 142 - Introduction to Kinesiology (3)
  • PSYC 201W - Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology (4)

and two courses from

  • BISC 101 - General Biology (4)
  • CHEM 121 - General Chemistry and Laboratory I (4)
  • MATH 154 - Calculus I for the Biological Sciences (3)
  • PHYS 101 - Physics for the Life Sciences (3)

and one course from

  • PSYC 100 - Introduction to Psychology I (3)
  • PSYC 102 - Introduction to Psychology II (3)

SET 2

Students must complete

  • Courses listed in SET 1 not yet taken
  • PSYC 210 - Introduction to Data Analysis in Psychology (4)

and, if necessary, additional courses from

  • BPK 205 - Introduction to Human Physiology (3)
  • BPK 207 - Sensorimotor Control and Learning (3)
  • CHEM 122 - General Chemistry II
  • CHEM 281 - Organic Chemistry I (4)
  • MATH 155 - Calculus II for the Biological Sciences (3)
  • MBB 201 - Biochemistry of the Cell (3)
  • PHYS 102 - Physics for the Life Sciences II (3)
  • PSYC 221 - Introduction to Cognitive Psychology (3)
  • PSYC 280 - Introduction to Biological Psychology (3)

Application Procedure

Students should complete a program approval form available on the Behavioural Neuroscience website and submit it to the BPK or Psychology advisor by June 1 for fall term approval, October 1 for spring term approval, or February 1 for summer term approval. Students who do not meet the competitive approval GPA upon completion of all SET 1 and SET 2 courses should make an appointment with the program advisor to discuss alternatives.

Program Requirements

Students complete 120 units, as specified below.

Lower Division Requirements

Students complete all of the following 58 units.

Biology

BISC 101 - General Biology (4)

An introduction to the biochemical and physiological mechanisms of living organisms. Topics covered include cell structure and function, DNA replication and the flow of genetic information, enzyme function, metabolism and physiology of microorganisms, plants, and animals. Prerequisite: High school Biology 12 (or equivalent) with a C grade or better, or BISC 100 with C- or better, or BISC 113 with C+ or better, or HSCI 100 with C+ or better; and High school Chemistry 12 (or equivalent) with a C grade or better, or CHEM 111 with a C- or better. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kevin Lam
Norbert Haunerland
Edward Pokrishevsky
Megan Barker
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Th 9:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
D101 Tu 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SSB 8169, Burnaby
AQ 5016, Burnaby
D102 Tu 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSB 8169, Burnaby
AQ 5016, Burnaby
D103 Tu 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSB 8169, Burnaby
AQ 5005, Burnaby
D105 We 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SSB 8169, Burnaby
AQ 5006, Burnaby
D106 We 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSB 8169, Burnaby
AQ 5005, Burnaby
D107 We 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
Fr 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSB 8169, Burnaby
AQ 5005, Burnaby
D109 Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
Th 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
WMC 2533, Burnaby
SSB 8169, Burnaby
D110 Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Th 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 3515, Burnaby
SSB 8169, Burnaby
D112 We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
Fr 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
WMC 3250, Burnaby
SSB 8169, Burnaby
D113 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Fr 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 3513, Burnaby
SSB 8169, Burnaby
D114 We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Fr 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 4120, Burnaby
SSB 8169, Burnaby
MBB 201 - Biochemistry of the Cell (3)

An introduction to cellular processes with an emphasis on protein structure and function. Topics that will be explored include transcription, translation and protein synthesis, basic metabolic pathways, biomembranes, organelles, vesicle transport, the cytoskeleton and cell signaling. Prerequisite: BISC 101; CHEM 281 as prerequisite or corequisite.

Chemistry

CHEM 121 - General Chemistry and Laboratory I (4)

Atomic and molecular structure; chemical bonding; thermochemistry; elements; periodic table; gases liquids, solids, and solutions. This course includes a laboratory component. Prerequisite: Chemistry 12 with a minimum grade of C, or CHEM 109 or 111 with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for CHEM 120 or 123 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 John Canal
Mo, We, Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
D101 We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
BLU 9655, Burnaby
D102 We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
BLU 9655, Burnaby
D103 We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
BLU 9655, Burnaby
D104 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 9655, Burnaby
D105 We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
BLU 9655, Burnaby
D107 Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5039, Burnaby
D108 Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
D109 Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
D110 Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
BLU 9655, Burnaby
D111 Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
D112 Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 5118, Burnaby
D113 Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 5118, Burnaby
D200 Mo, We, Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SRYE 3016, Surrey
D201 Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SRYC 2980, Surrey
D202 Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SRYC 2980, Surrey
LA04 We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LA06 Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LB04 We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LB06 Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LC01 Th 3:30 PM – 7:20 PM
SRYC 2780, Surrey
LC02 Th 3:30 PM – 7:20 PM
SRYC 2780, Surrey
LE01 TBD
LE02 TBD
CHEM 122 - General Chemistry II (2)

Chemical equilibria; electrochemistry; chemical thermodynamics; kinetics. Students who intend to take further laboratory courses in chemistry should take CHEM 122 concurrently with CHEM 126. Prerequisite: CHEM 120 or 121 with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for CHEM 124 or CHEM 180 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Charles Walsby
Mo, We, Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
D101 We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5006, Burnaby
D102 We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5006, Burnaby
D103 We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 5118, Burnaby
D104 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 5118, Burnaby
D105 We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5016, Burnaby
D106 Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5039, Burnaby
D107 Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5039, Burnaby
D108 Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5039, Burnaby
D109 Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 5118, Burnaby
D110 Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 5120, Burnaby
D111 Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5039, Burnaby
D112 Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
D113 Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
D200 Garry Mund
We, Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYC 2600, Surrey
D201 Mo 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SRYC 2980, Surrey
D202 Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SRYC 2980, Surrey
D203 Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYC 2980, Surrey
D204 Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYC 2750, Surrey
D205 Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYC 2750, Surrey
D206 Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SRYC 2750, Surrey
D300 Garry Mund
We, Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYC 2600, Surrey
D301 Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SRYC 2980, Surrey
CHEM 281 - Organic Chemistry I (4)

Structure, bonding, physical and chemical properties of simple organic compounds. Introduction to spectroscopy. Kinetics and mechanisms of organic reactions. This course includes a laboratory component. Prerequisite: CHEM 121 with a minimum grade of C-. Corequisite: CHEM 122. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 M Khaled Arafeh
Uwe Kreis
Mo, We, Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 3182, Burnaby
D101 Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5039, Burnaby
D102 We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5008, Burnaby
D103 We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
D104 We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 5118, Burnaby
D105 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
D106 We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
D107 Fr 12:30 PM – 1:30 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
D108 Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5039, Burnaby
LA03 Tu 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSB 8120, Burnaby
LA04 We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSB 8120, Burnaby
LA06 Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSB 8120, Burnaby
LA07 Fr 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSB 8120, Burnaby
LB04 We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSB 8120, Burnaby
LB06 Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSB 8120, Burnaby
LB07 Fr 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSB 8120, Burnaby
LE01 TBD

Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology

BPK 142 - Introduction to Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology (3)

Survey of theories and laboratory procedures for assessing human health status and physical performance, including biomechanics, body composition, development, environmental physiology, ergonomics, exercise physiology and motor learning. Functional anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular, nervous, respiratory, skeletal and skeletal muscle systems in relation to physical activity are explored. Prerequisite: One of Grade 12 Anatomy and Physiology, Biology, Chemistry or Physics with a grade of C or better; or one of BPK 105, BPK 110, BPK 143, BISC 100, BISC 113 or HSCI 100 with a grade of C or better. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ryan Peter Dill
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 3181, Burnaby
D101 We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCK 8640, Burnaby
D102 We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCK 8640, Burnaby
D103 We 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SSCK 8640, Burnaby
D104 We 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCK 8640, Burnaby
D105 Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCK 8640, Burnaby
D106 Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCK 8640, Burnaby
D107 Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCK 8640, Burnaby
D108 Fr 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCK 8640, Burnaby
D109 Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCK 8640, Burnaby
D110 Fr 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SSCK 8640, Burnaby
D200 Mike Walsh
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYC 2750, Surrey
D201 We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYC 2970, Surrey
D202 We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYC 2970, Surrey
D203 We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SRYC 2970, Surrey
BPK 205 - Introduction to Human Physiology (3)

An introductory survey of human physiology with an emphasis on mechanisms of regulation and integration. Anatomy of structures will be detailed only when it is critical to a functional understanding. Although this is intended as a survey course, some topics will be covered in reasonable detail in order to give insight into mechanisms of function. Prerequisite: BISC 101, CHEM 281, PHYS 101 and 102. BPK 208 may not be used as a substitute for BPK 205 by students in the BPK Major and Honours programs. BPK Major and Honours students who have taken BPK 105 must also take BPK 205. For students taking both of these courses, credit will only be given for BPK 205.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nadine Wicks
Mo, We, Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCK 9500, Burnaby
D101 Mo 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D102 Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D103 We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D104 We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D105 We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
D106 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
BPK 207 - Sensorimotor Control and Learning (3)

Students are introduced to basic concepts in the sensorimotor planning and control of movement. Topics include the factors and disorders affecting movement, sensory and motor physiology, sensorimotor integration, current theories of motor control, and motor learning. Taught from a behavioral and neurophysiological perspective that explores psychological influences on motor control. Prerequisite: BPK 142 or permission of instructor.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Dylan Cooke
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SWH 10041, Burnaby
BLU 9660, Burnaby
D101 Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCK 8650, Burnaby
D102 Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SSCK 8650, Burnaby
D103 Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCK 8650, Burnaby
D104 Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCK 8650, Burnaby
D105 Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SSCK 8650, Burnaby
D106 Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCK 8650, Burnaby

Mathematics

MATH 154 - Calculus I for the Biological Sciences (3)

Designed for students specializing in the biological and medical sciences. Topics include: limits, growth rate and the derivative; elementary functions, optimization and approximation methods, and their applications; mathematical models of biological processes. Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least B, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least C, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 150, 151 or 157 may not take MATH 154 for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Matthew DeVos
Mo, We, Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
OP01 TBD
MATH 155 - Calculus II for the Biological Sciences (3)

Designed for students specializing in the biological and medical sciences. Topics include: the integral, partial derivatives, differential equations, linear systems, and their applications; mathematical models of biological processes. Prerequisite: MATH 150, 151 or 154; or MATH 157 with a grade of at least B. Students with credit for MATH 152 or 158 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Luis Goddyn
Mo, We, Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
D200 Mo, We, Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SRYC 2600, Surrey
OP01 TBD
OP02 TBD

Physics

PHYS 101 - Physics for the Life Sciences I (3)

Force and motion, conservation of energy and momentum, fluids, properties of soft matter and thermal physics with applications taken from the life sciences. Prerequisite: BC Principles of Physics 12 or PHYS 100 or equivalent, with a minimum grade of C-. This prerequisite may be waived, at the discretion of the department, as determined by the student's performance on a regularly scheduled PHYS 100 final exam. Please consult the physics advisor for further details. Corequisite: MATH 150 or 151 or 154 or 157; BISC 100 or 101 or 102. Recommended Corequisite: PHYS 132. Students with credit for PHYS 120, 125 or 140 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Joanna Woo
Mo, We, Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
D102 Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
EDB 9651, Burnaby
D103 Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2507, Burnaby
D104 Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 6122, Burnaby
D106 We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D107 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 6122, Burnaby
D108 We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 2120, Burnaby
D109 We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D111 Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 5100, Burnaby
D112 Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 6100, Burnaby
D113 Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 6100, Burnaby
D114 Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 6122, Burnaby
D115 Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 6122, Burnaby
D116 Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 6122, Burnaby
D117 Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
TASC2 7201, Burnaby
D200 Rasoul Narimani
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYC 2975, Surrey
SRYC 2975, Surrey
D201 Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SRYC 2975, Surrey
OP01 Th 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SECB 1012, Burnaby
PHYS 102 - Physics for the Life Sciences II (3)

Waves and optics; electricity and magnetism; modern physics emphasizing radioactivity, with applications taken from the life sciences. Prerequisite: PHYS 101 or 120 or 125 or 140; MATH 150 or 151 or 154 or 157; both with a minimum grade of C-. Corequisite: BISC 100 or 101 or 102. Recommended Corequisites: MATH 152, 155 or 158; PHYS 133. Students with credit for PHYS 121, 126, or 141 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sarah Johnson
Mo, We, Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
D101 Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D102 Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
WMC 3513, Burnaby
D103 Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
D104 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5006, Burnaby
D106 Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5006, Burnaby
D107 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 5100, Burnaby
D108 We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 5100, Burnaby
D109 We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 5100, Burnaby
D111 Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 6100, Burnaby
D112 Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 6100, Burnaby
OP01 Th 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 2200, Burnaby

Psychology

PSYC 100 - Introduction to Psychology I (3)

Acquaints the student with the major issues in contemporary psychology and considers the historical antecedents. Special attention is given to questions of methodology and research design in psychology. Topics in physiological psychology, perception, learning and motivation are considered. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 George Alder
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
D900 Sherrie Atwood
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SRYC 2600, Surrey
PSYC 102 - Introduction to Psychology II (3)

Acquaints the student with major issues in contemporary psychology and considers their historical antecedents. Topics in learning, cognition, social psychology and abnormal psychology are considered. Recommended: PSYC 100 is recommended but not required. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Russell Day
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
D900 Sherrie Atwood
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SRYC 2600, Surrey
PSYC 201W - Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology (4)

An introduction to the procedures used in psychological research, and to the logic underlying them. Topics include the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches to research, the formulation of testable questions, the control of extraneous influences, the measurement of effects, and the drawing of valid conclusions from empirical evidence. Provides a background for senior psychology courses since it offers a basis for the critical evaluation and conduct of research. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or 102. Students with credit for PSYC 201 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Gordon Rose
Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 3181, Burnaby
D101 We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D102 We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D103 We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D104 We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5026, Burnaby
D105 We 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D106 Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D107 Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
D108 Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D109 Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D110 Th 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D111 Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D112 Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D113 Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 4115, Burnaby
D114 Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
PSYC 210 - Introduction to Data Analysis in Psychology (4)

Covers basic descriptive and inferential techniques most appropriately applied to the various forms of data from psychological research. Prerequisite: PSYC 201W and BC high school Math 12 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or BC high school Math 11 with a minimum grade of B- (2.67) or any level MATH or STAT course with a C- (1.67) or FAN X99 taken at SFU with a minimum grade of C (2.00). Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Matthew Sigal
Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 3149, Burnaby
D101 We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D102 We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D103 We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
D104 Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D105 Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 4115, Burnaby
D106 Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D900 Adam Blanchard
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYC 5080, Surrey
D901 Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SRYC 5080, Surrey
D902 Mo 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SRYC 5080, Surrey
PSYC 221 - Introduction to Cognitive Psychology (3)

Introduction to the study of cognitive and perceptual processes. Topics include memory, perception, attention, language, mental imagery, creativity, judgment and decision-making, and an introduction to cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, dyslexia, aphasia and attention-deficit disorder. Prerequisite: PSYC 100.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tom Spalek
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 3182, Burnaby
PSYC 280 - Introduction to Biological Psychology (3)

Surveys the major areas in biological psychology. Topics include the basics of neuroanatomy and nerve cell function, the behavioral and physiological effects of drugs and hormones in the nervous system, evolutionary perspectives on the brain and behavior, and the biopsychology of vision, the chemical senses, hearing, movement, biological rhythms, sex, and cognitive processes. Prerequisite: PSYC 100. Recommended: BISC 101. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Neil Watson
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 9660, Burnaby

Upper Division Requirements

Students complete a total of 45 units, including 43 required units as shown below.

Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology

Students complete 22 units, including all of

BPK 305 - Human Physiology I (3)

A detailed examination of the physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiac, vascular and respiratory systems. The course focuses on integration of physiological mechanisms at the molecular, cellular and systems levels. Prerequisite: BPK 205, MBB 231 (or 201), MATH 155 (or 152). Majors from outside BPK require BPK 205 (or BISC 305), MBB 231 (or 201), MATH 155 (or 152) plus permission of the instructor.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Thomas Claydon
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
We, Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 3150, Burnaby
AQ 3154, Burnaby
D101 Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 7101, Burnaby
D102 Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D103 Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D104 Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D105 Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 4125, Burnaby
D106 Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
BPK 306 - Human Physiology II (3)

A detailed examination of the physiology and pathophysiology of the nervous system, skeletal muscle and connective tissue. The course focuses on integration of physiological mechanisms at the molecular, cellular and systems levels. Prerequisite: BPK 207. Corequisite: BPK 305. Majors from outside BPK require BPK 205 (or BISC 305), MBB 231 (or 201), MATH 155 (or 152) plus permission of the instructor.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nadine Wicks
Mo, We, Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
WMC 3260, Burnaby
D101 Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D102 Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D103 Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 3515, Burnaby
D104 Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D105 Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 7101, Burnaby
BPK 326 - Functional Anatomy (4)

Pursues a systematic study of human anatomy with emphasis on functional applications. A comparative study of organs and body systems using laboratory dissections to provide an understanding of the three dimensional organization of the human body. Participation in all labs is required. Prerequisite: Admission to the major or honours program in Behavioural Neuroscience or Biomedical Physiology or Kinesiology. BPK 142, 201, 205 and at least 60 units. Behavioral Neuroscience Major and Honours students require BPK 142, 205, PSYC 280 and at least 60 units. Students with credit for BPK 325 may not repeat this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mo, We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 3005, Burnaby
D101 Mo, We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCK 9618, Burnaby
D102 Mo, We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCK 9618, Burnaby
D103 Mo, We 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SSCK 9618, Burnaby
BPK 426 - Functional Human Neuroanatomy (3)

Students will critically assess and investigate functional neuroanatomy, and examine how neuroimaging, animal models, and functional deficits in patients inform this knowledge. The course encompasses divisions of the human nervous system from both functional (sensory, motor, and autonomic) and anatomical (peripheral and central) perspectives, including the neural basis of higher cortical functions. Prerequisite: BPK 306 and BPK 326.

and six additional units from the following

BPK 415 - Neural Control of Movement (3)

An in depth study of the neurophysiology of movement. Illustrates general principles of neural control by exploring specific movement tasks including standing, walking, reaching/grasping, and eye movements. Prerequisite: BPK 306 or BISC 305.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Daniel Marigold
Tu, Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SECB 1013, Burnaby
BPK 446 - Neurological Disorders (3)

Examines neural and neuromuscular diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, stroke, and myasthenia gravis. Emphasizes currently favoured hypotheses, underlying evidence and pathogenic mechanisms. Prerequisite: BPK 306. Recommended: BPK 336 and/or BPK 415.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Charles Krieger
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 3210, Burnaby
SSCC 9000, Burnaby
BPK 448 - Rehabilitation of Movement Control (3)

This course is aimed at students interested in neuromuscular rehabilitation. Students will learn about the pathological origins of movement disorders associated with impaired function of sensory and motor systems. The course will be focused on the stages and strategies for recovery of voluntary control of essential functions. The range of rehabilitation interventions available to assist recovery and restore voluntary control will be explored, with special emphasis on advanced techniques to restore control of movement and bodily functions in paralyzed people. Prerequisite: BPK 201 or 207, and BPK 306, or for biomedical engineering students, BPK 201, 208 and 308.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Andy Hoffer
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 3003, Burnaby
WMC 3210, Burnaby

and three additional units selected from the following 

BISC 405 - Neurobiology (3)

Physiology of neuroscience, focusing on cellular and molecular mechanisms. Topics include: cellular and subcellular organization of the nervous system, electrical properties of neurons, ion channels, synaptic transmission, sensory systems, learning and memory, neurodegenerative diseases. Prerequisite: BISC 305 or BPK 305 or BPK 306 with a grade of C- or better. Students who have completed BISC 472 under the title 'Neurobiology' may not complete BISC 405 for further credit.

BPK 304W - Inquiry and Measurement in Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology (3)

This course covers the evaluation of measurement quality, test construction and assessment, and computer techniques for data capture and signal processing relevant to issues in Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology. Prereq statistical knowledge will be put into practice when discussing typical research designs, modeling and hypothesis testing in Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology. Prerequisite: BPK 142, 201, 205, and STAT 201. Students with credit for BPK 304 may not repeat this course for further credit. Writing/Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mike Walsh
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 3154, Burnaby
D101 Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 3148.1, Burnaby
D103 Th 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 3148.1, Burnaby
D104 Th 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
AQ 3148.1, Burnaby
D105 Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 3148.1, Burnaby
BPK 336 - Histology (3)

Light and electron microscopic study of mammalian tissues and organs with emphasis on human systems. Prerequisite: One of BPK 325, 326, BISC 305, 316.

BPK 407 - Human Physiology Laboratory (3)

Experiments dealing with the nervous, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems are covered. Prerequisite: BPK 305 and 306. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jim Carter
Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCK 8605, Burnaby
D200 Jim Carter
Fr 8:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCK 8605, Burnaby
D300 Jim Carter
Fr 12:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCK 8605, Burnaby
BPK 415 - Neural Control of Movement (3) *

An in depth study of the neurophysiology of movement. Illustrates general principles of neural control by exploring specific movement tasks including standing, walking, reaching/grasping, and eye movements. Prerequisite: BPK 306 or BISC 305.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Daniel Marigold
Tu, Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SECB 1013, Burnaby
BPK 446 - Neurological Disorders (3) *

Examines neural and neuromuscular diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, stroke, and myasthenia gravis. Emphasizes currently favoured hypotheses, underlying evidence and pathogenic mechanisms. Prerequisite: BPK 306. Recommended: BPK 336 and/or BPK 415.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Charles Krieger
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 3210, Burnaby
SSCC 9000, Burnaby
BPK 448 - Rehabilitation of Movement Control (3) *

This course is aimed at students interested in neuromuscular rehabilitation. Students will learn about the pathological origins of movement disorders associated with impaired function of sensory and motor systems. The course will be focused on the stages and strategies for recovery of voluntary control of essential functions. The range of rehabilitation interventions available to assist recovery and restore voluntary control will be explored, with special emphasis on advanced techniques to restore control of movement and bodily functions in paralyzed people. Prerequisite: BPK 201 or 207, and BPK 306, or for biomedical engineering students, BPK 201, 208 and 308.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Andy Hoffer
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 3003, Burnaby
WMC 3210, Burnaby
BPK 496 - Directed Study Literature (3)

Directed reading and literature research on topics selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. A short proposal of the project, approved by the course supervisor, must be submitted for approval to the chair of the undergraduate program committee by the end of the first week of classes of the term. May be repeated once for credit with a different course supervisor. Prerequisite: BPK 304W (may be taken concurrently) or PSYC 210, and permission from the chair of the undergraduate program committee. Usually, upper level standing with at least 75 units in the Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology program will be required.

or BPK 498 - Directed Study Experiential (3)

Directed study and research selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. A short proposal of the project approved by the course supervisor, must be submitted for approval to the chair of the undergraduate program committee by the end of the first week of classes of the term. May be repeated once for credit with a different course supervisor. Prerequisite: BPK 304W (may be taken concurrently) or PSYC 210, and permission from the chair of the undergraduate program committee. Usually, upper level standing with at least 75 units in the Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology program will be required.

*if not counted above

Psychology

Students complete at least 21 units, including all of

PSYC 300W - Critical Analysis of Issues in Psychology (4)

Trains students to evaluate critically important issues from the main areas of Psychology (e.g., Cognitive and Neural, Clinical, Developmental, History, Quantitative and Theoretical, Law and Psychology, Social)and to communicate their ideas clearly in written form. The content may vary in different offerings of the course. Prerequisite: PSYC 201W. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Gordon Rose
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 3181, Burnaby
D101 We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D102 We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D103 We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D104 We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5008, Burnaby
D105 We 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D106 Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5047, Burnaby
D107 Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D108 Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D109 Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D110 Th 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D111 We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D112 Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5046, Burnaby
PSYC 381 - Behavioral Endocrinology (3)

Examines the ways in which hormones influence the nervous system, regulating essential behaviors such as eating, drinking, sex, parenting, sleep, emotional behavior and cognitive processes. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 280.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Neil Watson
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 3003, Burnaby
PSYC 382 - Cognitive Neuroscience (3)

Examines the neurophysiological bases of cognitive and perceptual phenomena such as memory, attention, language, thinking, imagery, vision, audition, and sensory processes. The study of human cognitive performance with measurement techniques such as ERP, PET, and MRI is also discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 221, and 280.

and at least 11 units selected from the following

PSYC 301 - Intermediate Research Methods and Data Analysis (4)

A continuation of PSYC 201 and 210. Provides extensions of the basic theory and methods of research design and data analysis. Includes discussions of the analysis of substantive problems, the choice of appropriate research designs, and special problems that arise in the analysis of psychological data. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 210 and a minimum CGPA of 2.67. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Matthew Sigal
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5030, Burnaby
D101 Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D102 Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 3513, Burnaby
PSYC 303 - Perception (3)

An introduction to the study of perceptual processes with an emphasis on seeing and hearing. Topics include the perception of features, objects, motion, depth, time, visual illusions, and individual differences in perceptual ability. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 221 (or 335).

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tom Spalek
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 10051, Burnaby
PSYC 325 - Learning and Memory (3)

Examination of the phenomena of memory and the retention and reproduction of information. Considers the conditions and principles of retention and recall in short- and long-term memory. Prerequisite: PSYC 201W and PSYC 221 (or PSYC 280).

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Lesley Schimanski
Th 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
BLU 9660, Burnaby
PSYC 330 - Attention (3)

Survey the different aspects of paying attention. Topics include the effects of selective and divided attention on perceptual and cognitive function; the role of attention in human performance; attentional dysfunction and attention-deficit disorder; and the development of attentional capacity across the life span from newborns to the elderly. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 221.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Richard Wright
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 10041, Burnaby
PSYC 383 - Psychopharmacology (3)

A survey of how psychoactive drugs affect brain function to alter consciousness and behavior. Topics will include cellular effects of drugs that affect the central nervous system and discussions of the psychological and social effects of those drug-induced changes in the brain. Research on drug abuse and addictions and means of treating them will be covered. Historical, social and legal aspects of non-medical drug use will be discussed, as will the use of medications for the treatment of anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, dementias and other psychological disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 280.

PSYC 386 - Laboratory in Behavioral Neuroscience (4)

An overview of techniques used for studying the biological basis of behavior in humans and animals. Examines the logic and limitations of specific research methods. Provides an opportunity to master a set of techniques and to conduct supervised research projects in the laboratory. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 280.

PSYC 387 - Human Neuropsychology (3)

Examines the neural processes that underlie cognitive functioning and behavior. Topics include neuroanatomy, neuropathology, brain damage, neurological diseases (e.g., schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's), and problems in spatial ability, memory, language, mood and anxiety. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 221, and 280.

PSYC 388 - Biological Rhythms and Sleep (3)

Behavior and physiology are regulated by biological clocks, which function to synchronize the organism optimally with its environment. In this course we examine the adaptive role of clocks in animal behavior, the neural and endocrine mechanisms of daily, monthly and yearly rhythms, and the relevance of clocks, rhythms and sleep to human performance and psychopathology. We will also consider the mechanisms and functions of sleep states. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 280.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
PSYC 389 - Emotion and Motivation (3)

Explores the psychology and neuroscience of the related concepts of emotion and motivation by conducting a contemporary survey of the key psychology and behavioral studies carried out in the burgeoning area of affective science. Prerequisite: PSYC 201. Students with credit for PSYC 391 Emotion and Motivation may not take PSYC 389 for further credit.

PSYC 480 - Advanced Topics in Biological Psychology (4) *

Course can be repeated for credit. Students may not take this course for further credit if similar topics are covered. See Psychology department website for course description. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 280, 60 units, and a CGPA of 3.0. Other prerequisites vary by topic offering.

PSYC 491 - Advanced Topics in Psychology (4) *

Course can be repeated for credit. Students may not take this course for further credit if similar topics are covered. See Psychology department website for course description. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 60 units, a CGPA of 3.0. Other prerequisites vary by topic offering.

and three upper division elective units in any subject.

*Topic must be relevant to Behavioural Neuroscience

No more than six Research Engagement or Directed Studies units may be applied to this program.

Research Engagement Course

PSYC 393 - Research Engagement (0)

Students will engage in research activities to advance their understanding of the Psychology research process. The student will find a research supervisor and will meet at least bi-weekly with the supervisor. Workload will be equal to or greater than that of a regular course, with each credit corresponding to 3 hours of work in the lab; research activities will be determined by the supervisor. Variable units: 1, 2, 3. Graded on a pass/fail. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 60 units, a UDGPA of at least 2.5, and permission of the department. Tri-council ethics certificate.

Enrollment enables an individual to work with psychological research in consultation with the supervising instructor.

The minimum requirement is completion of the Tri-council ethics certificate, PSYC 201, 60 units, an upper division GPA of at least 2.5, and departmental permission. Research Engagement students complete an application form from the SFU Psychology website with the intended instructor. This course can be repeated for additional credit with the same or different instructor.

Directed Studies Courses

PSYC 493 - Directed Studies (3) *

Independent reading or research in topics selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 60 units, a UDGPA of at least 3.0, and permission of the department.

PSYC 494 - Directed Studies (3) *

Independent reading or research in topics selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 60 units, a UDGPA of at least 3.0, and permission of the department.

*Topic must be relevant to Behavioural Neuroscience

Enrollment enables an individual or small group to work with a faculty member on a reading or research project of mutual interest.

The minimum requirement is an upper division GPA of at least 3.00, at least 60 units and department permission. Directed studies students complete an application form from the SFU Psychology website with the intended instructor. Each Directed Studies course must be with a different instructor.

Program Continuation

A cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of not less than 2.20 is required for the continuance in the major.

Students must obtain a final course grade of C (2.0) or better in PSYC 201W-4 Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology.

Students must have grade of C- or better in all other required courses.

University Degree Requirements

Students must also satisfy University degree requirements for degree completion.

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student’s major subject
Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth Must be outside the student’s major subject, and may be lower or upper division
6 units Social Sciences: B-Soc
6 units Humanities: B-Hum
6 units Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth 6 units outside the student’s major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements)

Students choosing to complete a joint major, joint honours, double major, two extended minors, an extended minor and a minor, or two minors may satisfy the breadth requirements (designated or not designated) with courses completed in either one or both program areas.

 

A minimum of six units of designated humanities breadth (B-Hum) courses must be completed. The social sciences breadth (B-Soc), science breadth (B-Sci), undesignated breadth (UB) and quantitative (Q) requirements are satisfied through completion of the behavioral neuroscience lower division required courses so no additional course work is required. As well, the writing intensive requirement is satisfied by the completion of required courses PSYC 201W and 300 W. For more information, see www.sfu.ca/ugcr.

Residency Requirements and Transfer Credit

  • At least half of the program's total units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.
  • At least two thirds of the program's total upper division units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.

Elective Courses

In addition to the courses listed above, students should consult an academic advisor to plan the remaining required elective courses.