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Psychology Courses

PSYC 100 - Introduction to Psychology I (3)

Acquaints the student with the major issues in contemporary psychology and considers the historical antecedents. Special attention is given to questions of methodology and research design in psychology. Topics in physiological psychology, perception, learning and motivation are considered. Breadth-Social Sciences.

PSYC 102 - Introduction to Psychology II (3)

Acquaints the student with major issues in contemporary psychology and considers their historical antecedents. Topics in learning, cognition, social psychology and abnormal psychology are considered. Recommended: PSYC 100 is recommended but not required. Breadth-Social Sciences.

PSYC 106 - Psychological Issues in Contemporary Society (3)

Relates contemporary knowledge from psychology to current social problems. Provides relevant information from studies pertaining to problems such as attitude development, prejudice, race relations, addiction, behaviour technology, and family pathology. Course can be repeated for credit. See psychology department website for course description. Students may not take this course for further credit if similar topics are covered. Breadth-Social Sciences.

PSYC 109W - Brain, Mind and Society (3)

Introduces the student to issues in Psychology by surveying the research on brain and behaviour and the implications of this work for individuals and society. Beginning with neurons, this course explores the transition to human experience. Students with credit for PSYC X99 or X99W may not complete this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Science.

PSYC 201W - Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology (4)

An introduction to the procedures used in psychological research, and to the logic underlying them. Topics include the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches to research, the formulation of testable questions, the control of extraneous influences, the measurement of effects, and the drawing of valid conclusions from empirical evidence. Provides a background for senior psychology courses since it offers a basis for the critical evaluation and conduct of research. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or 102. Students with credit for PSYC 201 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Quantitative.

PSYC 210 - Introduction to Data Analysis in Psychology (4)

Covers basic descriptive and inferential techniques most appropriately applied to the various forms of data from psychological research. Prerequisite: PSYC 201W and BC high school Math 12 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or BC high school Math 11 with a minimum grade of B- (2.67) or any level MATH or STAT course with a C- (1.67) or FAN X99 taken at SFU with a minimum grade of C (2.00). Quantitative.

PSYC 221 - Introduction to Cognitive Psychology (3)

Introduction to the study of cognitive and perceptual processes. Topics include memory, perception, attention, language, mental imagery, creativity, judgment and decision-making, and an introduction to cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, dyslexia, aphasia and attention-deficit disorder. Prerequisite: PSYC 100.

PSYC 241 - Introduction to Abnormal Psychology (3)

Introduces students to the area of abnormal psychology. Topics include the definition and classification of pathological behaviour, factors involved in the development of pathology, and evaluation of therapy outcome. Prerequisite: PSYC 102.

PSYC 250 - Introduction to Developmental Psychology (3)

Considers the psychological and physical aspects of human development from conception through middle childhood. Topics include social, emotional, language, cognitive, perceptual and physical development. Prerequisite: PSYC 102.

PSYC 260 - Introduction to Social Psychology (3)

Examines methodology and content in social psychology. Topics include: attitudes and values; social perception and cognition; group behaviour; social includence; prejudice, discrimination, and sexism; aggression; altruism, interpersonal attraction and interpersonal relationships. Prerequisite: PSYC 102. Breadth-Social Sciences.

PSYC 268 - Introduction to Law and Psychology (3)

An introduction to the area of law and psychology. The role and influence of psychology in the legal system will be discussed. Topics include: social psychology and law, developmental psychology and law, juvenile justice, experimental psychology and law, mental disability and law. Prerequisite: PSYC 102.

PSYC 280 - Introduction to Biological Psychology (3)

Surveys the major areas in biological psychology. Topics include the basics of neuroanatomy and nerve cell function, the behavioural and physiological effects of drugs and hormones in the nervous system, evolutionary perspectives on the brain and behaviour, and the biopsychology of vision, the chemical senses, hearing, movement, biological rhythms, sex, and cognitive processes. Prerequisite: PSYC 100. Recommended: BISC 101. Breadth-Science.

PSYC 300W - Critical Analysis of Issues in Psychology (4)

Trains students to evaluate critically important issues from the main areas of Psychology (e.g., Cognitive and Neural, Clinical, Developmental, History, Quantitative and Theoretical, Law and Psychology, Social)and to communicate their ideas clearly in written form. The content may vary in different offerings of the course. Prerequisite: PSYC 201W. Writing.

PSYC 301 - Intermediate Research Methods and Data Analysis (4)

A continuation of PSYC 201 and 210. Provides extensions of the basic theory and methods of research design and data analysis. Includes discussions of the analysis of substantive problems, the choice of appropriate research designs, and special problems that arise in the analysis of psychological data. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 210 and a minimum CGPA of 2.67. Quantitative.

PSYC 303 - Perception (3)

An introduction to the study of perceptual processes with an emphasis on seeing and hearing. Topics include the perception of features, objects, motion, depth, time, visual illusions, and individual differences in perceptual ability. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 221 (or 335).

PSYC 308 - History and Systems of Modern Psychology (3)

Examines the development of modern psychology from the founding of the first laboratories in the late 19th century to the present. The development and revisions of the major theoretical systems of psychology are examined from a comparative and critical perspective. Prerequisite: PSYC 201. Students with credit for PSYC 207 may not take this course for further credit.

PSYC 325 - Learning and Memory (3)

Examination of the phenomena of memory and the retention and reproduction of information. Considers the conditions and principles of retention and recall in short- and long-term memory. Prerequisite: PSYC 201W and PSYC 221 (or PSYC 280).

PSYC 330 - Attention (3)

Survey the different aspects of paying attention. Topics include the effects of selective and divided attention on perceptual and cognitive function; the role of attention in human performance; attentional dysfunction and attention-deficit disorder; and the development of attentional capacity across the life span from newborns to the elderly. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 221.

PSYC 352 - Culture and Cognition (3)

Major theories, perspectives, research developments, and methods in cross-cultural developmental psychology. Topics include perception, attachment, social relationships, prosocial development, motor development, theory of mind, teaching and learning, language and communication, and play. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and PSYC 250. Students with credit for PSYC 391, Selected Topics in Psychology: Culture and Cognition, may not take PSYC 352 for further credit.

PSYC 354 - Development of Children's Thinking (3)

Examines research and theory concerning the origins and development of cognition in humans. Traces the development of language and children's thinking about the physical and social world from birth to adulthood, with a focus on infancy and childhood. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 250.

PSYC 355 - Adolescent Development (3)

Considers human development from the end of childhood to the beginning of the adult stage, from a bio-social point of view. Included among the topics are psychological effects of sexual maturation, choice of vocation and marriage partner, effects of participation in the gang and youth organization, cultural variations in the patterns of growth. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 250.

PSYC 356 - Developmental Psychopathology (3)

Examines theoretical approaches, research findings, and treatment outlooks concerning problems and disorders in childhood development. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 241 and 250.

PSYC 357 - Adulthood and Aging (3)

Considers human development from young adulthood to old age. Included are theories of adult development and aging; environmental and biological factors in aging; and the effects of aging on sensation, perception, learning, cognition, personality, psychopathology, and social relations. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 250 or acceptance into the diploma program in gerontology.

PSYC 358 - Language and Social Interaction (3)

Reviews the four major psychological models of talk and develops a new social pragmatic model of talk-as-social-interaction. The social pragmatic model is then applied to research in social development. Through lectures, course readings, and hands-on exercises in the tutorials (e.g., tape recording, transcription and analysis of natural talk) students will acquire competence in describing and analyzing talk from a social pragmatic perspective, and applying social pragmatics to an examination of central issues in social development. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 250.

PSYC 359 - Developmental Disabilities (3)

Developmental disorders and disabilities. Topics include genes and environment, peer and parent-child relationships, social attitudes, diversity, ethical issues, and behavioural therapies. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and PSYC 250 (or PSYC 241). Students who have credit for PSYC 391, Selected Topics in Psychology:Developmental Disabilities, may not take this course for further credit.

PSYC 361 - Individual Differences in Social Psychology (3)

Predicting people’s thoughts, feelings, behaviour, and happiness is complicated – it largely depends on people’s unique personality characteristics, beliefs, expectations, and motivations. Students will learn about the development and consequences of key individual differences in social psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 260. Students with credit for PSYC 391 under the title Individual Differences in Social Psychology may not take this course for further credit.

PSYC 362 - Close Relationships (3)

Reviews theory and research on the psychology of romantic relationships. Topics may include relationship theories, communication, social cognitive processes, intimate partner violence, and relationship interventions. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 260.

PSYC 363 - Intergroup Relations (3)

Provides an overview of the social psychological study of intergroup relations, considering classic and contemporary theory and research in the field. It includes discussions of the application of these ideas and findings to important social contexts, and explores ways in which the social psychological study of intergroup relations can help us understand and inform efforts to influence relevant social change. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 260.

PSYC 365 - Health Psychology (3)

Explores applications of psychological principles to health and health care. The development of the field of health psychology is traced and major topics introduced. Topics include health promotion, the hospital experience, communication in medical settings, coping with serious illness, psychoneuroimmunology, and field-specific methodology. Prerequisite: PSYC 201.

PSYC 366 - Psychology and Environmental Sustainability (3)

A survey of some of the ways that psychological theorizing and research, and social psychology in particular, can be applied to environmental sustainability. Introduces students to some of the environmental challenges faced by contemporary humans and the psychological implications of those challenges. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and PSYC 260. Students with credit for PSYC 391 Psychology and Environmental Sustainability may not take PSYC 366 for further credit.

PSYC 367 - Psychological Perspectives on Human Sexuality (3)

Examines human sexuality from a psychological perspective. Focuses on the empirical research on a variety of topics such as gender differences in sexuality, sexual orientation, models of sexual arousal, erotica, the interplay between sexual and relationship functioning, sexual problems and treatment. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, PSYC 260, PSYC 362. Students with credit for PSYC 391 Psychological Perspectives on Human Sexuality may not take PSYC 367 for further credit.

PSYC 370 - Introduction to Theories of Personality (3)

Focuses on classic and contemporary theories, conceptual debates, and empirical research in the area of personality. Prerequisite: PSYC 201. Students with credit for PSYC 270 may not complete this course for further credit.

PSYC 371 - Intervention: Process and Outcome (3)

Reviews the major approaches to psychological intervention in terms of theory, practice and outcome evaluation. The course will examine both the scientific and practitioner components of intervention. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 241. PSYC 270 (or 370) is recommended.

PSYC 376 - Experimental Psychology and Law (3)

The roles of experimental developmental, cognitive, and social psychology in the understanding of behaviour and perceptions of individuals in legal contexts. Topics include eyewitness testimony, autobiographical memory, interviewing, deception detection, and juror decision-making. Prerequisite: PSYC 201W and PSYC 268. Recommended: PSYC 210.

PSYC 379 - Clinical Forensic Psychology (3)

Clinical approaches to the understanding of behaviour in criminal and civil forensic settings. Topics related to the assessment, treatment, and management of people suffering from mental disorder. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 268. PSYC 241 is recommended.

PSYC 381 - Behavioural Endocrinology (3)

Examines the ways in which hormones influence the nervous system, regulating essential behaviours such as eating, drinking, sex, parenting, sleep, emotional behaviour and cognitive processes. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 280.

PSYC 382 - Cognitive Neuroscience (3)

Examines the neurophysiological bases of cognitive and perceptual phenomena such as memory, attention, language, thinking, imagery, vision, audition, and sensory processes. The study of human cognitive performance with measurement techniques such as ERP, PET, and MRI is also discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 221, and 280.

PSYC 383 - Psychopharmacology (3)

A survey of how psychoactive drugs affect brain function to alter consciousness and behaviour. Topics will include cellular effects of drugs that affect the central nervous system and discussions of the psychological and social effects of those drug-induced changes in the brain. Research on drug abuse and addictions and means of treating them will be covered. Historical, social and legal aspects of non-medical drug use will be discussed, as will the use of medications for the treatment of anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, dementias and other psychological disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 280.

PSYC 385 - Evolution and Psychology (3)

Topics such as altruism, parental care, mate choice, sex differences in behaviour, aggression, dominance and territoriality are considered from an evolutionary perspective. The role of heredity and environment in the development of these behaviours is also discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 201W.

PSYC 386 - Laboratory in Behavioural Neuroscience (4)

An overview of techniques used for studying the biological basis of behaviour in humans and animals. Examines the logic and limitations of specific research methods. Provides an opportunity to master a set of techniques and to conduct supervised research projects in the laboratory. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 280.

PSYC 387 - Human Neuropsychology (3)

Examines the neural processes that underlie cognitive functioning and behaviour. Topics include neuroanatomy, neuropathology, brain damage, neurological diseases (e.g., schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's), and problems in spatial ability, memory, language, mood and anxiety. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 221, and 280.

PSYC 388 - Biological Rhythms and Sleep (3)

Behaviour and physiology are regulated by biological clocks, which function to synchronize the organism optimally with its environment. In this course we examine the adaptive role of clocks in animal behaviour, the neural and endocrine mechanisms of daily, monthly and yearly rhythms, and the relevance of clocks, rhythms and sleep to human performance and psychopathology. We will also consider the mechanisms and functions of sleep states. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 280.

PSYC 389 - Emotion and Motivation (3)

Explores the psychology and neuroscience of the related concepts of emotion and motivation by conducting a contemporary survey of the key psychology and behavioural studies carried out in the burgeoning area of affective science. Prerequisite: PSYC 201. Students with credit for PSYC 391 Emotion and Motivation may not take PSYC 389 for further credit.

PSYC 391 - Selected Topics in Psychology (3)

Course can be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PSYC 201. Other prerequisites vary by topic offering. Students may not take this course for further credit if similar topics are covered. See Psychology department website for course description.

PSYC 393 - Research Engagement

Students will engage in research activities to advance their understanding of the Psychology research process. The student will find a research supervisor and will meet at least bi-weekly with the supervisor. Workload will be equal to or greater than that of a regular course, with each credit corresponding to 3 hours of work in the lab; research activities will be determined by the supervisor. Students may repeat this course for further credit. Variable units: 1, 2, 3. Graded on a pass/fail. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 60 units, a UDGPA of at least 2.5, and permission of the department. Tri-council ethics certificate.

PSYC 402 - Advanced Topics in History and Theoretical Psychology (4)

Course can be repeated for credit. Students may not take this course for further credit if similar topics are covered. See Psychology department website for course description. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 308 (or 207), 60 units, and a CGPA of 3.0. Other prerequisites vary by topic offering.

PSYC 410 - Research Design I (4)

Reviews the basic logic of controlled experimentation, and focuses on analysis of variance designs commonly used in psychological research. Particular emphasis is given to the relative merits of the several designs when there are multiple research questions to be answered. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 301, 60 units, and a CGPA of 3.0. Quantitative.

PSYC 411 - Research Design II (4)

Focuses on multivariate regression and correlation models. Deals with ways of answering questions when direct experimental manipulation is not feasible, and demonstrates the utility of the principles involved for solving problems other than those for which they were first proposed.. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 301, 60 units, and a CGPA of 3.0. Recommended: PSYC 410. Quantitative.

PSYC 425 - Field School I

The focus of the field school will be determined by the field school country. Course may be organized by topic, theme, theory, area, critical approach, or individual author, and will be supplemented with related field trips. Field school course may be repeated for credit if held in a different location. Variable units: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. Prerequisite: 30 units, PSYC 201, other prerequisites vary by topic offering, permission from the Field School Director. Students may be required to successfully complete a Criminal Record Check depending on the site of the field school and the community partners involved.

PSYC 426 - Field School II

The focus of the field school will be determined by the field school country. Course may be organized by topic, theme, theory, area, critical approach, or individual author, and will be supplemented with related field trips. Field school course may be repeated for credit if held in a different location. Variable units: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. Prerequisite: 30 units, PSYC 201, other prerequisites vary by topic offering, permission from the Field School Director. Students may be required to successfully complete a Criminal Record Check depending on the site of the field school and the community partners involved.

PSYC 441 - Advanced Topics in Clinical Psychology (4)

Course can be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 241, and 60 units, and a CGPA of 3.0. Other prerequisites vary by topic offering. Students may not take this course for further credit if similar topics are covered. See Psychology department website for course description.

PSYC 450 - Advanced Topics in Developmental Psychology (4)

Course can be repeated for credit. Students may not take this course for further credit if similar topics are covered. See Psychology department website for course description. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 250 and 60 units, and a CGPA of 3.0. Other prerequisites vary by topic offering.

PSYC 457 - Behavioural Neuroscience Undergraduate Honours Thesis Proposal (3)

An in-depth investigation of a topic in behavioural neuroscience, culminating in a critical literature review and the formulation of a research proposal. Prerequisite: 90 units, including PSYC 301 with a minimum grade of B and permission of the Chair of Behavioural Neuroscience Coordinating Committee.

PSYC 459 - Behavioural Neuroscience Undergraduate Honours Thesis (9)

A written thesis based on research previously proposed in PSYC 457. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of B in PSYC 457.

PSYC 461 - Advanced Topics in Social Psychology (4)

Course can be repeated for credit. Students may not take this course for further credit if similar topics are covered. See Psychology department website for course description. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 260, 60 units, and a CGPA of 3.0. Other prerequisites vary by topic offering.

PSYC 476 - Advanced Topics in Law and Forensic Psychology (4)

Course can be repeated for credit. Students may not take this course for further credit if similar topics are covered. See Psychology department website for course description. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 268, 60 units, and a CGPA of 3.0. Other prerequisites vary by topic offering.

PSYC 480 - Advanced Topics in Biological Psychology (4)

Course can be repeated for credit. Students may not take this course for further credit if similar topics are covered. See Psychology department website for course description. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 280, 60 units, and a CGPA of 3.0. Other prerequisites vary by topic offering.

PSYC 490 - Honours Project (4)

An in-depth investigation of a topic in psychology, culminating in a critical literature review and the formulation of a research proposal. Prerequisite: 75 units, PSYC 300 and 301, both with a minimum grade of 3.0, CGPA 3.33, and permission of the department.

PSYC 491 - Advanced Topics in Psychology (4)

Course can be repeated for credit. Students may not take this course for further credit if similar topics are covered. See Psychology department website for course description. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 60 units, a CGPA of 3.0. Other prerequisites vary by topic offering.

PSYC 493 - Directed Studies (3)

Independent reading or research in topics selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 60 units, a UDGPA of at least 3.0, and permission of the department.

PSYC 494 - Directed Studies (3)

Independent reading or research in topics selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 60 units, a UDGPA of at least 3.0, and permission of the department.

PSYC 495 - Directed Studies (3)

Independent reading or research in topics selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 60 units, a UDGPA of at least 3.0, and permission of the department.

PSYC 499 - Honours Project (9)

The research proposed in PSYC 490 is executed and the results are written up in thesis format. Prerequisite: PSYC 490.

PSYC 600 - Biological Bases of Behaviour (3)

PSYC 605 - STT-The History and Use of Evolutionary Theory in Psychology (3)

This course will provide an in-depth analysis of the history and use of evolutionary theory in psychology and allied disciplines. The major evolutionary theories currently in play will be discussed in light of the neo-Darwinian modern synthesis that was largely forged in the 1930s and 1940s along with more recent developments in evolutionary biological theory. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

PSYC 705 - Proseminar in History and Systems (3)

PSYC 715 - Proseminar in Measurement (1.5)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 744 - Proseminar in Psychopathology (3)

PSYC 750 - Proseminar in Developmental Psychology (3)

PSYC 770 - Proseminar in Personality (3)

PSYC 790 - Proseminar in Law and Psychology (3)

PSYC 791 - Proseminar 2 in Law and Psychology (3)

Empirical and legal issues in law and psychology.

PSYC 806 - Advanced Topics in Assessment (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 820, 821, 822, 823, 824, or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 807A - Advanced Topics in Intervention: Child Therapy (3)

Current theoretical and empirical issues in the area of child and adolescent therapy. Prerequisite: PSYC 820, 821, 822, 823, and 824; or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 807B - Advanced Topics in Intervention: Family Therapy (3)

Provides an overview of the current theoretical and empirical issues in the area of family therapy. Prerequisite: All of PSYC 820, 821, 822, 823, and 824; or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 807D - Advanced Topics in Intervention: Couples Research and Therapy (3)

Conceptual and theoretical issues in Marital Therapy. Prerequisite: PSYC 822, 823, and admission to the Clinical Psychology Graduate Program; or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 807E - Advanced Topics in Intervention: Cognitive-Behaviour Therapy (3)

Conceptual and theoretical issues in Cognitive Behaviour therapy. Prerequisite: All of PSYC 820, 821, 822, 823, and 824; or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 807F - Advanced Topics in Intervention: Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (3)

Provides the theory, science, and practice of Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT). Prerequisite: PSYC 820, 821, 822, 823, or permission from the instructor.

PSYC 809 - Advanced Topics in Applied Psychology (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 820, 821, 822, 823, 824, or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 815 - Mental Health Law and Policy (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 790.

PSYC 819 - Ethics and Professional Issues (3)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Graduate program standing.

PSYC 820A - Psychological Assessment I (3)

History, theory, and clinical issues in the psychological assessment of mental abilities. Prerequisite: Admission to the Clinical Psychology Graduate Program.

PSYC 820B - Psychological Assessment II (3)

History, theory, and clinical issues in the psychological assessment of personality and psychopathology. Prerequisite: Admission to the Clinical Psychology Graduate Program. Corequisite: PSYC 821B.

PSYC 821A - Practicum in Psychological Assessment I (2)

Administration and interpretation of tests that assess mental abilities. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Admission to the Clinical Psychology Graduate Program. Corequisite: Enrollment in PSYC 820A. Students must successfully complete a Criminal Record Check.

PSYC 821B - Practicum in Psychological Assessment II (2)

Administration and interpretation of tests that assess personality and psychopathology. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: PSYC 821A. Corequisite: PSYC 820B. Students must successfully complete a Criminal Record Check.

PSYC 822 - Psychological Intervention I (3)

Introduction to theoretical concepts and practical applications of therapy. Prerequisite: Admission to the Clinical Psychology Graduate Program.

PSYC 823 - Psychological Intervention II (3)

Science, theory, and practice of evidence-based psychological interventions with an emphasis on cognitive-behaviourally (CBT) oriented approaches. Prerequisite: Admission to the Clinical Psychology Graduate Program.

PSYC 824 - Research Issues in Psychology (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to the Masters or Doctoral program.

PSYC 825 - Clinical Practice (2)

Clinical students are required to enroll in PSYC 825 each term from the time they start the program until they go on internship, except when granted leave from the program. Students enrolled in a full-time practicum may request an exemption from PSYC 825 intake and caseload requirements by speaking to the CPC Director. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Admission to Clinical Psychology Graduate Program. Students must successfully complete a Criminal Record Check.

PSYC 830 - Seminar in Child Evaluation and Treatment Formulation (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 820, or PSYC 820A and PSYC 820B.

PSYC 831 - Practicum in Child Evaluation and Treatment Formulation (2)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: PSYC 820, or PSYC 820A and PSYC 820B. Corequisite: PSYC 830. Students must successfully complete a Criminal Record Check.

PSYC 836 - Forensic Assessment (3)

Criminal and civil forensic assessment issues. Prerequisite: PSYC 790, 815.

PSYC 880 - Junior Practicum (3)

450 hour placement to complete clinical work in an approved setting. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: PSYC 744, 770, 820, 821, 910, 911. Students must successfully complete a Criminal Record Check.

PSYC 881 - Senior Practicum (3)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Admission to the doctoral clinical program. Students must successfully complete a Criminal Record Check.

PSYC 882 - Neuropsychology Practicum (3)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical program with a specialization in neuropsychology. Students must successfully complete a Criminal Record Check.

PSYC 886 - Internship (9)

Full-time clinical work for 12 months in an approved setting. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Enrolment in PSYC 886 must be continued for a total of three consecutive terms. Prerequisite: Equivalent of the MA clinical program, three PhD level courses, successful completion of the PhD comprehensive examinations, and successful defense of the PhD research proposal. Students must successfully complete a Criminal Record Check.

PSYC 890 - Practicum in Clinical Forensic Psychology (3)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: PSYC 790, 835 or 836. Students must successfully complete a Criminal Record Check.

PSYC 892 - Research/Policy Practicum in Law and Psychology (3)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: PSYC 790. Students must successfully complete a Criminal Record Check.

PSYC 895 - MA Thesis Proposal (3)

Development and presentation of proposal for MA thesis research. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 896 - PhD Thesis Proposal (3)

Development and presentation of proposal for PhD thesis research. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 897 - Research Project/Law & Psyc/Forensic Psyc (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 790.

PSYC 898 - MA Thesis (12)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 899 - PhD Thesis (12)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 907B - Neurocognitive Disorders (3)

PSYC 907D - Advanced Topics in Biological Psychology: Cognitive Aging and Dementia (3)

PSYC 910 - Research Design I: Experiments (3)

Reviews the basic logic of controlled experimentation, and focuses on analysis of variance designs commonly used in psychological research. Particular emphasis is given to the relative merits of the several designs when there are multiple research questions to be answered.

PSYC 911 - Research Design II: Research Studies (3)

Focuses on multivariate regression and correlation models. Deals with ways of answering questions when direct experimental manipulation is not feasible, and emphasizes new applications.

PSYC 912 - Research Seminar (1.5)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 913 - Research Seminar (1.5)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 914 - Research Seminar (1.5)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 916 - Research Seminar (1.5)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 917 - Research Seminar (1.5)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 918 - Research Seminar (1.5)

Research seminars are designed specifically to enable graduate students in Psychology to plan, execute, and analyse research including that leading to MA and PhD degrees. The seminars will provide directions for future research, critical discussion of pending designs, aid in resolving problems in ongoing studies, and alternative interpretations of results of completed projects. The research seminar courses are graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 925 - Seminar in Cognitive Processes (3)

PSYC 944 - Seminar in Psychopathology (3)

PSYC 950 - Seminar in Developmental Psychology (3)

PSYC 960 - Seminar in Social Psychology (3)

PSYC 980 - Biological Psychology (3)

PSYC 990 - Seminar in Law and Psychology (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 790.

PSYC 991 - Research Comprehensive Examination 1 (3)

A specific Comprehensive Examination will be designed to include tasks organized to test the student’s competence, in depth, on topics related to his or her research. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 992 - Research Comprehensive Examination 2 (3)

A specific Comprehensive Examination will be designed to include tasks organized to test the student’s competence, in depth, on topics related to his or her research. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 993 - Research Comprehensive Examination 3 (3)

A specific Comprehensive Examination will be designed to include tasks organized to test the student’s competence, in depth, on topics related to his or her research. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 997 - Directed Studies (3)

PSYC 998 - Directed Readings (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to the masters or doctoral program.

PSYC 999 - PhD Clinical Comprehensive Examination (6)

All students in the experimental and clinical psychology PhD programs are required to successfully complete the comprehensive exam. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Admission to Clinical Psychology Graduate Program.